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cheers amin

                   i'll have a scan through it then pass the link on to kevin's wife.

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Good man!
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6 December 2006
BID TO CUT POPPING THE PILLS...

HEALTH ministers want to cut the amounts of anti-depressants being prescribed to Scots.

The Executive aims to slash the yearly rise in the prescribing of anti-depressants to zero by 2010.

The move is part of a shake-up of mental health services.

Targets have also been set to try to reduce the number of people with mental health problems who are readmitted to hospital.

The Executive are investing £2.5million in the measures which form part of the plan, Delivering For Mental Health.

Deputy Health Minister Lewis Macdonald said: "Our wide-ranging plan will change the way mental health services are delivered in the future - so there is a focus on better prevention, more local care and improved support to help aid recovery."

In 1992, £12.28million was spent on anti-depressants in Scotland.

Last year, this figure had risen to £58.73million.


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Drug trial victims slam 'whitewash' report...

The solicitor for a number of men who nearly died when a drugs trial went wrong described a list of recommendations drawn up to prevent the tragedy happening again as a "whitewash".

A group of Government-appointed scientists has made 22 recommendations after six volunteers nearly died at a medical trial at Norwick Park Hospital in north London in March.

One patient, Mr Nav Modi, was described as looking like "the Elephant Man" after his head swelled up. Another lost part of his fingers and toes through a frost-bite like reaction.

The report's final recommendations call for changes relating to the medicines regulator, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), saying it was too quick to approve the trial and that it should have taken independent advice.

But Martyn Day, the solicitor for four of the six victims, described the report as "the latest in a series of whitewashes".

He said: "The Duff report has done a good job at looking at the lessons to be learnt but it does nothing in terms of helping my clients understand the detail of exactly what happened and what went wrong."

He added: "This is not only upsetting for them but is an indictment of a system that, despite four reports from the regulator (the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency) and now Professor Duff, the finger of blame has been pointed at no-one.

Mr Day said his clients planned to sue Parexel, the company responsible for the trial, unless the company promised them financial help to cope with any illness arising from the trial.

Professor Gordon Duff, who led the working group said: "There is certainly a need to develop new medicines for conditions where current treatment is inadequate but, in clinical trials, the wellbeing of volunteers must always come first.

"We believe our recommendations would safeguard this in the future."


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21 December 2006
'SURGEON'S BLUNDER LED TO MAN'S DEATH'.

A MAN died in agony following a blunder by a surgeon, a court heard yesterday.

Robert McLean lost his fight for life in Stirling Royal Infirmary in January 2005 after a procedure carried out by Czech doctor Patrick Tosenovsky.

To senovsky was employed at the hospital in October 2004.

He rightly removed a faulty vein graft from the 58-year-old's leg that he found "floating in pus".

But "just plain wrongly" he opted to carry out another graft after the first failed, two experts told a fatal accident inquiry. Mr McLean, from Stirling, had the first operation in September 2004.

In November his wound became infected and Tosenovsky carried out a second operation which caused the infection to spread through his body.

His leg was amputated in a bid to save his life but he died two months later.

Two respected surgeons told the inquiry at Stirling Sheriff Court that the decision to re-operate on Mr McLean led directly to his death.

The inquiry continues


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30 December 2006
GRAPE WAY TO FALL ASLEEP.

GRAPES used to make popular red wines contain high levels of the sleep hormone melatonin, scientists have discovered.

This means a glass of Merlot or Cabernet Sauvignon could help fight insomnia.

Researcher Iriti Marcello, of the University of Milan, who made the discovery, said: "It could help regulate sleep-wake patterns."


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Tens of thousands struck down by virus...

A VIRAL infection affecting tens of thousands of Scots led to a massive increase in calls to the NHS helpline over the New Year period.

Scotland's out-of-hours service, NHS 24, received more than 14,000 calls on 30 December - an increase of 4,000 on the total expected for this time of year.

 

Similarly high figures were reported for Hogmanay and New Year's Day, putting extra pressure on the service.

NHS 24 said the respiratory infection was to blame for the extra workload and urged the public to try treating their symptoms themselves before calling the helpline. But both NHS 24 and the ambulance service said they had planned for the extra workload expected over Christmas and New Year, when many GPs close their doors for several days.

NHS 24 said the respiratory virus had emerged shortly after Christmas.

Dr George Crooks, NHS 24 medical director, said that since then they had received a high number of calls from people suffering symptoms such as high temperatures, sore throats and coughs.

"It is affecting all parts of Scotland and is not concentrated in any one area," he said. "It is also affecting all age groups, from the very young to the elderly."

Other symptoms include aches and pains, headache and tiredness.

Dr Crooks said: "For the vast majority of people this infection is not serious and lasts between three to five days. Some people with other underlying medical conditions, such as asthma and bronchitis, can be more badly affected, but they should continue to take their medication and call their GP or NHS 24 if their condition gets markedly worse."

Dr Crooks said NHS 24 had received many calls from people who had not tried the standard home treatments, such as drinking plenty of fluids and taking regular doses of paracetamol or ibuprofen.

"I would ask people to try self-treatment in the first instance, but if that does not work then contact us for further advice," he said.

Dr Ian McKee, a retired GP in Edinburgh, said that his former practice in Wester Hailes had seen a large number of patients suffering from the respiratory virus.

"There does seem to be some bug going round which is affecting some people for longer than just a few days," said Dr McKee. "It causes them to be below par for quite a while.

"In most cases, patients should just make a routine appointment to see their GP when they are open again. But if they are very ill then they should obviously call NHS 24 for more advice."


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3 January 2007
COCAINE BINGERS RISKING THEIR LIVES.

RISK-TAKING Scots are endangering their lives by mixing booze and cocaine.

Drugs experts yesterday revealed that more Scots users than ever were mixing the drug with vast quantities of alcohol.

Mixing the two gives users a bigger buzz - but puts their health at a huge risk.

Alex Meikle, of the Glasgow Council on Alcohol, said: "What we now know is taking alcohol and drugs gives people a bigger buzz for their bucks.

"Used in combination, these are potentially lethal within a relatively short period of time.

"Alcohol leads to a 30 per cent increase in blood levels of cocaine, if taken at the same time.

"The liver combines the two stimulants to produce a chemical called coca-ethylene, which increases the buzz people get.

And we have evidence this is escalating across Scotland." The other danger from mixing the two is that it makes users far more aggressive.

Meikle added: "People who take the combination think they are the top dog.

"Guys think they are macho and have great sexual prowess and are more likely to take risks.

"But the truth is the opposite. They are likely to become so paranoid and aggressive, they will end up in a fight.

"They also have a far greater chance of dying from heart failure."

The health warnings came as experts revealed a rising number of Scots were using cocaine.

They say the falling price of the class A drug has led to at least a 25 per cent rise in users across the country in three years.


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NHS Grampian received over 14,000 calls in one day
NHS Grampian received over 14,000 calls in one day
Winter virus shows no sign of letting up

Click here to watch this video report in Windows Media format


A vicious winter virus that devastated Christmas and Hogmanay for thousands is showing no signs of abating.


NHS 24 helplines across Scotland have been deluged by calls since the bug took hold over the festive period. Doctors say it is respiratory-based and even more unpleasant than last year's

Staff at NHS 24 in Aberdeen
Staff at NHS 24 in Aberdeen
winter vomiting outbreak.


In call centres throughout the country, staff have been working flat-out to deal with the calls as GP surgeries closed over Christmas and New Year. NHS 24 has taken nearly 94,000 calls over the last eight days - At times call handlers were taking four calls every three seconds.


The bug has hit people of all ages - but mainly young adults aged 18-25.


Over the course of just one day at NHS 24 in Aberdeen, the service received more than 14,000 calls.

Victims should take liquids, paracetamol, ibuprofen and keep warm
Victims should take liquids, paracetamol, ibuprofen and keep warm


Pauline Strachan of NHS Grampian said: “We were predicting to be very busy over this spell as GP surgeries have been closed four days in a row for two weeks, so quite a lot of the calls that would have been going to GPs are going to out of hours services. But we have been busier this week than we were expecting but we are coping well with the activity levels we've got”.


Chemists have also been inundated with sufferers seeking a home cure for their aches and pains


Pharmacist Iona Skinner said: “We've been fairly busy with people coming in with coughs and

colds and congestion and stuff like that. It's quite typical at this time of year. Mainly, colds are self-limiting so they'll heal themselves in a week or two so it's basically just treating the symptoms until they do clear up”.


Health bosses are warning that the virus could be around for some time to come.


The advice for those who fall victim is to take plenty of fluids and regular doses of paracetamol or ibuprofen and keep as warm as possible.


The number of cases does not appear to be dropping, but with GPs returning to work today, the workload on the call centres should be reduced.


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12 January 2007
MUSLIM HEALTH PLEA.

MUSLIMS should be given faith-based NHS services, a medical expert has claimed.

Professor Aziz Sheikh wants female patients to see same-sex medics, better prayer facilities in hospitals and more information on the drugs so that Muslims can avoid alcohol and pigderived pharmaceuticals.

The University of Edinburgh professor also wants male infant circumcision to be available throughout the NHS and Muslims on health boards by law, he writes in the British Medical Journal.


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'Revenge' dentist is struck off
A dentist from East Sussex has been struck off after he pulled out an 87-year-old grandmother's teeth without anaesthetic "to teach her a lesson".

The General Dental Council (GDC) found David Quelch, from Bexhill, guilty of serious professional misconduct.

The woman told the hearing she bled profusely after two teeth were removed at the St Leonards Road surgery.

She said Mr Quelch was paying her back for complaining to her GP about an earlier course of treatment in 2001.

Now retired

"I was very shocked and frightened," she said.

"I wanted to get away - I ran to the door and he called out, 'That'll teach you not to complain to the doctor about me'."

The GDC found "not proved" charges that Mr Quelch restrained the patient against her will and that extracting the teeth was not clinically necessary.

It said that, although he had now retired, he was being erased from the Dentists Register because he posed a serious potential risk to patients.

The dentist did not attend the hearing.


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Get Well Soon Tam

 

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
a.k.a. Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COLD)

Medical Revising Author: George Schiffman, MD
Medical Editor: William C. Shiel, Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

What is COPD?

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is comprised primarily of two related diseases - chronic bronchitis and emphysema. In both diseases, there is chronic obstruction of the flow of air through the airways and out of the lungs, and the obstruction generally is permanent and progressive over time.

Asthma also is a pulmonary disease in which there is obstruction to the flow of air out of the lungs, but unlike chronic bronchitis and emphysema, the obstruction in asthma usually is reversible. Between "attacks" of asthma the flow of air through the airways usually is good.

There are exceptions, however. In some patients with COPD the obstruction can be partially reversed by medications that enlarge or dilate the airways (bronchodilators) as with asthma. Conversely, some patients with asthma can develop permanent airway obstruction if chronic inflammation of the airways leads to scarring and narrowing of the airways. This process is referred to as lung remodeling. These asthma patients with a fixed component of airway obstruction are also considered to have COPD.

There also is frequent overlap among COPD patients. Thus, patients with emphysema may have some of the characteristics of chronic bronchitis. Similarly, patients with chronic bronchitis also may have some of the characteristics of emphysema.

How does the normal lung work?

The lung is the organ for gas exchange; it transfers oxygen from the air into the blood and carbon dioxide (a waste product of the body) from the blood into the air. To accomplish gas exchange the lung has two components; airways and alveoli. The airways are branching, tubular passages that allow air to move in and out of the lungs. The wider segments of the airways are the trachea and the two bronchi (going to either the right or left lung). The smaller segments are called bronchioles. At the ends of the bronchioles are the alveoli, thin-walled sacs. (The airways and alveoli can be conceptualized as bunches of grapes with the airways analogous to the stems and the alveoli analogous to the grapes.) Small blood vessels (capillaries) run in the walls of the alveoli, and it is across the thin walls of the alveoli where gas exchange between air and blood takes place.

Healthy Lung

Breathing involves inspiration followed by exhalation. During inspiration, muscles of the diaphragm and the rib cage contract and expand the size of the chest (as well as the airways and alveoli) causing negative pressure within the airways and alveoli. As a result, air is sucked through the airways and into the alveoli. During exhalation, the same muscles relax to their resting positions, shrinking the chest and creating positive pressure within the airways and alveoli. As a result, air is expelled from the lungs.

The walls of the bronchioles are weak and have a tendency to collapse, especially while exhaling. Normally, the bronchioles are kept open by the elasticity of the lung. Elasticity of the lung is supplied by elastic fibers which surround the airways and line the walls of the alveoli. When lung tissue is destroyed, as it is in patients with COPD who have emphysema, there is loss of elasticity and the bronchioles can collapse and obstruct the flow of air.


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26 January 2007
PROSTATE TREATMENT WARNING.

PROSTATE cancer treatment can significantly reduce penis length, a new study suggests.

Turkish researchers studied 47 men with advanced prostate cancer who received hormone therapy followed by radiation treatment.

Doctors at Ankara University found the average penis length was 14.2cm before treatment and 8.6cm after 18 months of therapy.

The British Prostate Cancer Charity said yesterday that men should be warned of the possible side effect.


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Quote:

The British Prostate Cancer Charity said yesterday that men should be warned of the possible side effect.

 

 

Maybe die or have smaller bits?? no much of a choice eh?

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  http://www.knowthescore.info


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