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hammer6

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Reply with quote  #16 

I think FERRIS BUELLER swayed the argument for Paul's direct posting although I have to wait for Admin to confirm if this is the case.


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Bilko

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Reply with quote  #17 

Understood hammer6, we do have to take into account the fact the man has a busy lifestyle and i am sure many different irons in the fire. If he can find the time i am sure he will.

 

If not then it will be due to working busily behind the scenes which we all know is just as important, if not more so, than being in the front line so to speak. Bilko


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hammer6

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Reply with quote  #18 

FERRIS & FRONTLINE on the same page? I have not seen that for ages :-)


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Reply with quote  #19 

Well hammer6 after checking this out myself i sincerely hope you've no referance to this other forum other than 'Pish Palace', as i for one wouldn't waste another precious moment on it!!I think PC Dickheid must've been told to go n make the coffee or sumthin and got a wee bit peeved at the fact,as i frankly would've had more to moan aboot cleanin up dugshit on a bit o monoblockin!! If not then i hope the halfwitt puts his words and oppinions in a more constructive and relevant to the matter type o place...ie:here! the next time he's spue to spill. xxxsteeleyma

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Reply with quote  #20 

lol you are indeed right and a very strong message you posted well done to you!

 

Indeed we should all be on this forum debating REAL issues for REAL people like ourselves!


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Reply with quote  #21 

Hi All... thanks for the posts (and a few laughs)...  Steeleyma, you most definately have a way with words!  Keep the posts coming everyone


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gmac

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Reply with quote  #22 

just read the posts on police corruption which were interesting, and good just so that each person who actually agrees on this is not alone. The police are the biggest criminals, not all of them of course but the ones who realise this early in their career usually decide there and then whether they want to be a part of this.

They clearly abuse the power the uniform gives them, and usually make sure they gain profits for their work

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Reply with quote  #23 

Hi GMAC... thanks for your post on the topic on 'Deviant Behaviour of the Police.  You made some very valid points in your post, with which I fully agree.  The police do abuse the power that their uniform gives them, and whether they choose to be a part of this or not, is their choice.

 

I would say that not all police are corrupt, but as Admin has previously pointed out, the good cops should come forward and shop their corrupt counterparts. The question is, are they brave enough, or will the lure of the pension stand in their way?


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mactheknife

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Reply with quote  #24 



Click here to find out more!

Feds: Cops Moonlighted As Hitmen


 Two retired police detectives living in Las Vegas led double lives as Mafia hitmen while on the force and gave confidential information to the mob for more than a decade, federal prosecutors charged.

One of the suspects, Louis Eppolito, had even gone on to become a Hollywood actor best known for his roles as a mobster.
 
 It's also noteworthy that Eppolito was once the 11th most decorated cop in New York history and after retirement wrote a book titled: "Mafia Cop: The Story of an Honest Cop," which dealt with, among other things, what he said were false charges of Mafia involvement.

He and his former partner, Stephen Caracappa, were arrested Wednesday night at a restaurant off the Las Vegas Strip, law enforcement officials said Thursday. The pair have been living in Las Vegas since retiring in the early 1990s.

Each is charged with eight murders, two attempted murders, murder conspiracy, obstruction of justice, drug distribution and money laundering.

"Carcappa and Eppolito were paid handsomely for selling out the files of the NYPD," U.S. Attorney Roslynn Mauskopf said. "These corrupt former detectives betrayed their shields, their colleagues, and the citizens they were sworn to protect."

The pair appeared late Thursday in federal court in Las Vegas but did not enter pleas. The hearing was postponed until Friday.

Outside court, Caracappa's lawyer David Chesnoff accused the government of using "organized crime figures who are trying to save their lives" to build their case. "The government is relying on the words of rats," he said.

Family members declined to comment.

According to court documents, Eppolito, 56, and Caracappa, 63, targeted several mobsters in retaliation for the attempted assassination of Luchese family underboss Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso.

In 1987, the detectives kidnapped a mob figure, stuffed him in a car trunk and delivered him to Casso, who tortured and killed him, prosecutors said.

Eppolito and Caracappa also allegedly took $65,000 from Casso in 1992 to kill Eddie Lino, a Gambino family captain suspected of involvement in the attempt on Casso's life. The detectives followed Lino from a Brooklyn social club, pulled him over and shot him to death, prosecutors charged.

In addition, the detectives were accused of accessing police files to give mob associates the names of three confidential informants who were slain for their cooperation with police, prosecutors said. Another informant was shot but survived.

Eppolito, the grandson, son and nephew of Mafia members, became known in the 1970s and '80s as much for his suspected ties to the mob as his rough-and-tumble arrests of street thugs. In his 1992 autobiography, he described his family background and decorated career, while rebutting the mob allegations.

Caracappa, who helped found the New York Police Department's Organized Crime Homicide Unit, was a gatekeeper of information about Mafia killings investigated by police.

The two men had been suspected of Mafia involvement for more than a decade, but authorities did not have the evidence to make a case against them. Court documents indicate prosecutors now have wiretapped conversations and the testimony of witness.
 

Click here to find out more! Click here to find out more! Click here to find out more!

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hammer6

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‘Noble cause corruption’

Paul Condon, head of the Metropolitan Police during most of the 1990s, was protected by both Tory and Labour governments—despite massive scandals, including the Stephen Lawrence affair, that rocked the Yard.

It was Condon who coined the phrase “noble cause corruption”. This was the idea that some police justifiably “bend the rules” to get a conviction when officers “knew” the accused was guilty, but had no proof.

Condon was saying that the corruption at the heart of the Met had “noble” intentions. It was a green light for his officers to continue to “fit up” the innocent.


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Reply with quote  #26 

Hi mactheknife & Hammer6... thanks for your posts with regards to the 'Deviant Behaviour Of The Police'. The article relating to the Cops who moonlighted as hitmen for the Mafia was indeed a shocking case, and disgusting that they managed to get away with their double lives for as long as they did.

 

With regards to Hammer6's post 'Noble Cause Corruption', I wasn't entirely sure that I was reading the post correctly, but then again, Admin was not surprised in the slightest that it was some dim-witted head of the Metropolitan Police during the 1990s, Paul Condon, who first coined the aforementioned phrase.

 

To say that some police justifiably "bend the rules" to get a conviction when officers knew the accused was guilty but had no proof, and then to go on to say that corruption at the heart of the Met had "noble" intentions... 

 

Well, one can only conclude that it was indeed a green light for his officers to continue to fit up the innocent.

 

And on that note, clearly many police forces in Scotland have followed this theory of 'Noble Cause Corruption', as you only have to look at the amount of fit-ups that have gone on in years past, and CONTINUE TO GO ON TO THIS DAY to see that things haven't progressed within the system since this idiot first mentioned 'Noble Cause Corruption'.

 

 

 

 

 


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mactheknife

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Reply with quote  #27 
Noble Cause Corruption
Definition: Notion held by police officers that it is justifiable to fabricate or artificially improve evidence to secure the conviction of a known criminal.

Derivation: Noble cause corruption was coined by Edwin DeLattre in Character and Cops: Ethics in Policing (Washington, DC: American Enterprise Institute, 1989), Ch 11. Popularised in the UK in September 1992 by Sir John Woodcock, Chief Inspector of Constabulary, England and Wales.

Citation: "To go back to corruption for one moment, one aspect is what is known as noble cause corruption. Someone connected with the Police Federation once said to me that there was nothing wrong with perjury committed by an honest officer in pursuit of a good cause". House of Commons, Select Committee on Home Affairs, Minutes of Evidence, Examination of witnesses, Question 128 1998-12-08.

 

________________________________________________________________

 

International Anti-Corruption Newsletter -- Oct 2000

RCMP Canada

Conduct Unbecoming

Should police take the law into their own hands to make the world a safer place?

Until recently, most police colleges avoided all mention of "noble-cause corruption" or the more famous cases of wrongful conviction. But today, the law enforcement community recognizes the need to open up about wrongful convictions - and the actions, or omissions, that lead up to them - and to do so as part of basic training.

"In our job, I believe that omission and commission are synonymous. Turning a blind eye to another officer's wrongdoing is irresponsible to the point of being party to the offence," says Assistant Commissioner Rob Leatherdale. "Nor can I see any justification for the manipulation or fabrication of evidence," he continues. "Our job is to gather evidence and present it to the courts. It is their job to judge the evidence."

Still, despite limited resources, rising demands for service and increased litigation, it's wise to invest time and resources for instruction and supervision to prevent ethical compromise. Down the line, these measures will save the expense of criminal investigations and investigative commissions, not to mention the human and financial toll of damaged police/community relations.

Research on "noble-cause corruption" advocates early intervention. Officers typically begin their careers as enthusiastic, highly motivated people. But if young officers over-invest in their professional role, they can base their whole identity on their job. The resulting "us versus them" mentality first alienates officers from the people they serve, and soon distances them from the criminal justice system. RCMP cadets discuss "noble-cause corruption" in the course of their training which may be the first and only basic training programme in Canada to address this controversial subject.

"Ethics, morality and honesty are the cornerstones of the RCMP," concludes Assistant Commissioner Leatherdale. "They govern most of what we do day-to-day. A personal commitment to stand up for what is right is what protects most of us from crossing the line."

Nicholas Levesque
Communication Services Branch
Headquarters Royal Canadian Mounted Police


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Reply with quote  #28 
ferrisconspiracy : UPDATE
 
 
12 April 2006
PERV COP SET TO LOSE PENSION

A POLICE chief has launched a bid to stop a sex beast cop collecting his pension.

Predator Dean Stewart was jailed for five years last December for indecently assaulting two women and a 15-year-old girl while in uniform. He was cleared of a catalogue of other sex charges.

Stewart, 35, resigned from Strathclyde Police before he was convicted, in a bid to hang on to his £7000-a-year pension.

But the force's chief constable, Willie Rae, is now asking Strathclyde Police Board to stop the payments to the pervert.

The board will consider the case tomorrow. Rae wrote in his report to members: "Ex-Constable Stewart's offences are considered to be despicable and evil.

"His victims were vulnerable women, and, in one case, little more than a child.

 

"His actions cannot be seen as anything other than a complete violation of his oath of office and a betrayal of the trust placed in him."

Stewart preyed on women between 1998 and 2004 while serving in Ayrshire.

He was originally charged with 13 sex attacks and 10 counts of indecent assault. He denied everything but was convicted at the High Court of assaulting women aged 24 and 30 as well as the underage schoolgirl.

If, as expected, Stewart loses his pension, his contributions to the scheme will have to be returned to him.

 

ferrisconspiracy : VIEW

 

Depraved of any morality and he is not alone with a complete violation of oath and office and a betrayal of the trust placed in him.

 

Indeed this man should not get any money from a POLICE PENSION and neither should any of the rest who have violated the oath , office and betrayal of the TRUSTof the PUBLIC.

 

OK the guy's a sex beast who violated the innocent as has many other POLICE OFFICERS who were ensnared in a GLOBAL INVESTIGATION carried out by the American law enforcement agencies into sick pedophiles.

 

The only reason they were caught was due to their credit card numbers to download images of young children.

 

Are these POLICE OFFICERS still having their pensions paid? not to mention the other PERVERTS who put guy's in PRISON during a POLICE CRIMINAL CONSPIRACY to gain a conviction?

 

For that too is a violation of the INNOCENT, violation of the OATH, violation of office, and an equal violation of the TRUST of THE PUBLIC.

 

PERVERTS PERVERTING THE RULE OF LAW ARE EQUALLY REPREHENSIBLE AS THOSE WHO SEEK SEXUAL GRATIFICATION FROM OTHER INNOCENTS= NO PENSION or are they being selective on who gets kept on the GRAVY TRAIN?

 

********************************************************

Sex attacks officer set to lose police pension

CRAIG BROWN

A POLICEMAN who was jailed for a series of "despicable" sex attacks could be stripped of his £7,000-a-year pension, after a decision by Strathclyde Police to launch a legal challenge.

Dean Stewart, 35, of Paisley, was convicted of two indecent assaults and molesting a girl aged 15. Chief Constable Willie Rae has moved to block his police pension, saying that the former PC had violated his position of trust.

Mr Rae said: "Ex-constable Stewart's offences are considered to be despicable and evil.

"His actions cannot be seen as anything other than a complete violation of his oath of office as a constable and a betrayal of the trust placed in him."

He said the former constable's actions had damaged the "fundamental structure of confidence which society must place in the police service".

The chief constable continued: "It is impossible properly to comprehend the full impact on ex-constable Stewart's victims in knowing their violator was a serving police officer and was actively abusing the powers and privileges of his office to commit those appalling offences."

A spokeswoman for Strathclyde Police confirmed that the application for a certificate had been made to the Scottish Parliament.

She said: "Strathclyde Police is asking the joint police board to contact the Scottish Parliament to ask for Scottish ministers to issue a certificate to confirm that ex-constable Stewart's conduct is liable to lead to a serious loss of confidence in the police service.

"If a certificate is issued, the joint police board may seek to forfeit all or some of Mr Stewart's police pension for a period or forever."

Stewart's trial at the High Court in Glasgow was the longest of its kind in Scottish legal history. He was accused of three rapes and ten indecent assaults between 1998 and 2004.

Jim Duffy, the chairman of Strathclyde Police Federation, said Stewart's crimes had undermined the work of his former colleagues.

He added: "We can well understand why the board would want to go down this route. The conduct of this one individual has made the jobs of the other 15,000 officers in Scotland more difficult.

"The federation shares the disappointment of the public that an officer has failed the high standards rightly expected and that his position of trust within the community has been abused."

 

Sex attack police officer faces losing his pension
A police officer jailed for "despicable and evil" sex attacks could be stripped of his pension after a legal challenge by Strathclyde Police

 


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Reply with quote  #29 

The Times April 12, 2006

Jail for PC who conned £280,000 from pensioner


A POLICE officer who stole almost £300,000 from an 89-year-old woman whom he met while investigating allegations that she had been the victim of a conman was jailed for four years yesterday.

John Morgan, 48, spent £280,000 of Joan Harpin’s money in a three-year spending spree while working as a police constable. He had pleaded not guilty to eight charges of obtaining money by deception and four charges of forgery.

Morgan, who resigned from Essex Police after his arrest, stole Miss Harpin’s savings and sold her home in Palmers Green, North London. He befriended her five years ago after meeting her to investigate claims that she had been conned out of £3,000 by builders. He was working for the Metropolitan Police.

When Miss Harpin became ill, Morgan encouraged her to sell her home of more than 40 years and put the money into a joint bank account for which they were both signatories. He also persuaded her to give him power of attorney, which he then used to set up bank accounts in his own name. He spent some of the money on a Rolex watch, an Audi TT and a VW Golf, and on paying credit card debts.

Miss Harpin, who now lives in a care home in Holland-on-Sea, Essex, knew nothing about how her money was being spent. David Walbank, for the prosecution, told Basildon Crown Court that when police officers told her about the Rolex, she replied: “The saucy thing.”

She told the police that Morgan gave her a lot of papers to sign and said: “I just trusted him, you see. He was going to look after everything.”

Judge Christopher Mitchell said that Morgan saw Miss Harpin as a goose who laid golden eggs. He told Morgan: “[She was] a timid, retiring spinster. You gained her confidence . . . You were quite prepared to fleece her when it suited you.” He added: “People trusted you implicitly because of your position. Joan Harpin was vulnerable because of her age, health and general mental capacity. She had no real grasp of the size of money.”

The police have managed to recover about £170,000 from Morgan and are trying to get more. His assets, a home in Frinton-on-Sea, cars and the watch, have been seized.

Morgan told detectives that Miss Harpin had given him consent to look after her assets and he was acting in her best interests. He was caught after a bank became suspicious about Miss Harpin’s signature, which was actually genuine, on a document presented by him.

Detective Sergeant Angie Garrard, who led the investigation, called Morgan evil. She said: “People like Morgan are motivated by greed. He used Miss Harpin’s money to fund a lavish lifestyle and was living way above the means of a normal police officer. He was in a position of trust and he abused one of the most vulnerable members of our society.”

Morgan’s wife, Eunice, 50, was cleared last month of offences relating to Miss Harpin’s money after a judge ruled that there was insufficient evidence.

 


Tuesday, 28 March 2006

Detectives charged on corruption
A detective and two former detectives are among six men who have appeared in court on corruption charges.

John Matthews, 58, a Staffordshire Police detective, and his two former colleagues Anthony Wood, 63, and Gary Flanagan, 41, were in court in London.

Gordon Bucher, 52, of Hereford, Jeremy Young, 38, of Ilford, east London, and Scott Geltsthorpe, 31, of Kettering, Northamptonshire, also appeared.

All six are charged with conspiracy to commit misconduct in public office.

They face allegations over the unauthorised use of the police national computer.

Met investigation

Mr Matthews, currently suspended from duty, and Mr Wood and Mr Flanagan, who are now both private investigators, are each charged with conspiracy to commit misconduct in a public office between September 2003 and April 2005.

They are accused of carrying out an unauthorised check on the police national computer for the benefit of a private investigation company.

Mr Flanagan, of Clayton, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire, is also charged with theft of a police warrant card between September 1999 and February 2006.

The men were arrested after an investigation by the Metropolitan Police's Anti-Corruption Command.

Mr Wood and Mr Matthews, who are both from Stafford, and Mr Flanagan and Mr Bucher, of Aconbury Avenue, received unconditional bail to appear at Southwark Crown Court in London on 22 June.

Mr Young and Mr Geltsthorpe were released on conditional bail to appear at Southwark Crown Court on the same date.

hammer6

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ferrisconspiracy : UPDATE/POLICE

 

Officers are obliged to disclose an existing... 

Officers are obliged to disclose an existing criminal conviction. Each force takes its own action for discipline if an offence is committed while serving.
Picture: Allan Milligan

 

158 Scots officers have criminal record

 

Police dismay as figures show 1 in every 100 officers convicted of a crime

Two inspectors and nine sergeants of Strathclyde police have records

Chief police officers vow to establish national vetting procedure

 

 

Key quote "You cannot have someone who has been convicted of drink-driving arresting a member of the public for the same thing" - senior police source

Story in full AT LEAST 158 serving police officers in Scotland have convictions for offences ranging from assault and drink-driving to attempting to pervert the course of justice.

 

The figures - obtained under the Freedom of Information Act - reveal six of Scotland's eight forces employ officers convicted of criminal offences, including inspectors and sergeants.

Politicians and police board members yesterday expressed their surprise at the high figure and pledged to ask questions of chief constables. And senior officers told The Scotsman of their concerns that some forces were being too lenient on some crimes committed by their staff.

The Association of Chief Police Officers in Scotland (ACPOS) is so concerned by the issue it is now drawing up a set of national vetting rules which is likely to list convictions that will automatically bar someone from joining the service.

The issue was thrown into the spotlight by Fabian Wright, a former constable with Grampian, who was jailed last month for dangerous driving for his part in an off-duty accident that killed 16-year-old Lisa Marie Wyllie in Aberdeen last year.

Following his trial, the force admitted the 28-year-old had a previous conviction for theft before he joined the police.

Deputy Chief Constable Pat Shearer revealed another 24 serving officers in Grampian have convictions for offences committed before and during their police career, but insisted the force had introduced stringent new vetting procedures to weed out unsuitable candidates.

But the figures obtained by The Scotsman show the issue goes far further than one force. In Strathclyde, 82 police officers have records - 24 of whom had convictions before joining the force. Of the 82, two are inspectors, nine are sergeants and 71 constables, including six "specials".

Lothian and Borders would only give details about officers who had gained convictions since 2000, of which there are nine - three of whom were guilty of assault and six of breach of the peace.

Scotland has about 16,000 police officers, which means about one in every 100 has at least one criminal conviction. In at least 38 of the 158 known cases, the convictions were gained prior to the officer joining the service. At the moment, while every police officer is obliged to declare a criminal conviction, each of Scotland's eight police forces takes its own decisions on recruiting officers and for discipline if an offence is committed while serving.

A senior source within one force said: "We take pretty much a zero-tolerance attitude towards officers who are guilty of drink-driving. You cannot have someone who has been convicted of drink-driving arresting a member of the public for the same thing. Other forces may not take quite such a clear approach."

Jean McFadden, the convener of the Strathclyde Joint Police Board, said she was alarmed that police officers convicted of assault were still serving, and pledged to raise the matter with Chief Constable Willie Rae. She said: "I'd be very surprised if someone convicted of assault isn't dismissed from the force. What I say to new recruits when they are sworn into the service is that a higher standard of conduct is expected of them than in other jobs, both on and off duty."

Kenny MacAskill, the SNP's justice spokesman, said: "It does seem a very high number. There are some offences where it would be very surprising if officers were able to serve, but a degree of discretion for more minor offences should be shown."

Deputy Chief Constable Garry Sutherland, chairman of the ACPOS professional standards business area, said that when considering applicants, forces must "take a balanced view and consider each individual on their merits".

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