The Ferris Conspiracy Forum
Sign up  |   |   |  Calendar
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 3 of 12      Prev   1   2   3   4   5   6   Next   »


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #31 

Absolutely dejavu, parents are 100% responsible , i'd say not only till their 16 but as long as their under the parents roof. I've lost track of how many 'teams' are in my area, just the other eve i heard a lot of 'little voices' chanting the song of Y.O.T...oor local gang  out my back, they were no taller than grasshoppers...one o them was my boy too, so he got a lecture and i made him watch panorama too was about gangs, was not a happy chappy! High school beckons and i just know that's going to be the start of a worrying few years.  

dejavu

Registered:
Posts: 1,392
Reply with quote  #32 


   Good for you Ma big respect for you at least you did'nt ignore the fact that you as a parent dealt with it . Ma so many times I've seen parent's denying their kid's behaviour or blaming it on someone else. Poor kids don't learn anything from that. I learned the hard way and it's no easy. I know there is a lot of peer pressure but we are not only parents we are teachers as well our offsprings will follow our lead. God Ma sure it's hard being a parent ?  Cheers Ma always enjoy reading your posts xxx 

__________________
Rather swallow My Blood Than my Pride


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #33 
I love reading your posts dejavu, you do great work with those kids and i very much admire you for that, i'm sure you've saved quite a few from taking the wrong path and from reading your posts including your introduction you clearly have had this in your blood since birth, well done to you, be proud of yourself and long may your work continue
As for parenting the young ones, it is probably one of the hardest tasks in world for all parents, however the parents that do take no notice and let their kids off with 'murder' i'm afraid there is never any hope of them opening their eyes, therefore what hope is there for their kids. Oddly enough in my area i find it's usually the type of parent who spends most of their time not having a clue where their kids are or caring what time they get in, it seems that most o the real bad one's here are allowed anything, allowed out till they want, go where they want and so on...whilst the parents are like a figment of the imagination, either that or sadly parents are drug addicted. The 'normal' parents like myself make sure we know what their up to, we know we can go to each others door without it getting shut in our faces and by heck if mine mess up , mother's bite IS worse the her bark  i admit i'm rather strict, but it didn't do me or any of my siblings any harm for my parents were quite strict too. Until the kids grow into adulthood then the parents are firmly to blame for their actions, i don't believe in people saying 'We can't do anything with him/her,' that is an excuse, you do and do again until you sort it.
Rossfife

Registered:
Posts: 242
Reply with quote  #34 

Police chief calls for curbs on youth drinking

Wednesday, 15 Aug 2007 08:32
The police chief's call for action comes after the killing of father-of-three Gary Newlove

A chief constable has called for measures to be taken to prevent young people from consuming alcohol.

He was speaking at a press conference a day after three teenagers were charged with the killing of father-of-three, Gary Newlove, in Warrington.

Cheshire chief constable Peter Fahy criticised parents for "turning a blind eye" to the drinking problem among teenagers.

Mr Fahy also said that police could not buck the trend of anti-social behaviour caused by the "alcohol culture" on their own and he put the onus of preventing the practice on parents.

"Parents should be the key to tackling this problem. They are responsible for their children - and that responsibility is not abdicated when they become teenagers.

"Parents need to provide an understanding of what is right and wrong, a sense of social responsibility, and guidance through these key years," the high ranking officer added.

"Alcohol is too cheap and too readily available and is too strong. Young people cannot handle it. I would like to see the price of alcohol raised, particularly higher strength beers."

Mr Fahy also called for the legal drinking age to be raised from 18 to 21 and for greater police powers to send boisterous youths back home.

He also recommended an increase in the price of alcohol.

"We cannot have a society where adults feel scared to go out and challenge youngsters up to no good as this just breeds fear and isolation.

"The police cannot do it alone. We are doing everything we can, within our resources and powers, but it is not enough," he concluded.

Mr Newlove, 47, was attacked after he confronted a gang of youths on Friday. He had approached them after he saw his neighbour's mechanical digger being vandalised.


__________________
long live street justice
Rossfife

Registered:
Posts: 242
Reply with quote  #35 

such as sad story, im sure well at least i hope the ppl involved werent trying to kill Mr Newlove but none the less this is shocking


__________________
long live street justice
hammer6

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 8,395
Reply with quote  #36 

Fantastic reading...


__________________
The TRUTH is out there...........
madmax

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 971
Reply with quote  #37 

Quote:
Originally Posted by steeleyma
I love reading your posts dejavu, you do great work with those kids and i very much admire you for that, i'm sure you've saved quite a few from taking the wrong path and from reading your posts including your introduction you clearly have had this in your blood since birth, well done to you, be proud of yourself and long may your work continue
As for parenting the young ones, it is probably one of the hardest tasks in world for all parents, however the parents that do take no notice and let their kids off with 'murder' i'm afraid there is never any hope of them opening their eyes, therefore what hope is there for their kids. Oddly enough in my area i find it's usually the type of parent who spends most of their time not having a clue where their kids are or caring what time they get in, it seems that most o the real bad one's here are allowed anything, allowed out till they want, go where they want and so on...whilst the parents are like a figment of the imagination, either that or sadly parents are drug addicted. The 'normal' parents like myself make sure we know what their up to, we know we can go to each others door without it getting shut in our faces and by heck if mine mess up , mother's bite IS worse the her bark  i admit i'm rather strict, but it didn't do me or any of my siblings any harm for my parents were quite strict too. Until the kids grow into adulthood then the parents are firmly to blame for their actions, i don't believe in people saying 'We can't do anything with him/her,' that is an excuse, you do and do again until you sort it.

dejavu, you are one of the unsung hero's


__________________
One of these days.....
Rossfife

Registered:
Posts: 242
Reply with quote  #38 

aye there alot of good points in there, i was shocked to say the least when about Mr Newloves terrible death, a few similar stories were covered on last nights news, i keep saying it but this is gettin scarey, apparently 30% of brits sleep whith some kind of weapon near by incase off a violent break in, my gran an grandad are always going on about the days when you didnt need to lock you door, how the times have changed


__________________
long live street justice
madmax

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 971
Reply with quote  #39 
This article may be of relevance to the topic and the debate.

A teenage beauty queen with everything to live for Scotland on Sunday

Sun 24 Jun 2007

TWO years ago George Shaw delivered a moving eulogy at a memorial service for fisherman Robertson Buchan. As he comforted mourners, the head of the Peterhead Fishermen's Mission was struck by the compassion and strength shown by Buchan's charismatic 18-year-old daughter Saranna.

Now she too lies dead and Shaw is preparing for another funeral.

The brutality of the former beauty queen's killing has sent shock waves of revulsion through a town which, in recent years, has become numbed by the steady encroachment of drug- related tragedy.

Last week Buchan's battered body was found in a squalid flat in the town's North Street. Next to her lay the corpse of James Logan, a drug dealer and local crime lord who habitually slept with a machete next to his bed.

Murder-squad detectives believe Logan, 41, bludgeoned the former Peterhead Academy schoolgirl to death before killing himself with a fatal overdose. It is thought the 20-year-old may have been beaten over the course of several days before she finally died in agony in Logan's harbour-front lair.

Buchan's picture, taken when she was a teenage beauty queen, stared out from newspaper front pages last week, highlighting the thwarted promise of a life cut short.

"Saranna was lovely girl who was very promising at school and had everything to live for," said Shaw. "Unfortunately like so many others in this area she developed problems with drugs.

"What happened to this beautiful, polite girl was nothing short of horrific. It has shaken the entire community and people are asking, 'Why did this happen?'"

After the death of her father, it seems the teenager attempted to block out her grief with heroin and crack cocaine. Her growing addiction led her into the clutches of Logan, who became her lover.

Logan's ready supply of hard drugs gave him a hold over the vulnerable, addicted youngster. Buchan's decline accelerated after she sold the house in Peterhead's Ravenscraig Road she had inherited from her father. The £72,000 windfall attracted a number of drug dealers in the town, including Logan, who had moved to the north-east from Govan in the 1990s.

His nondescript first-floor flat became synonymous with the drugs trade. Postal workers frequently arrived in the street to find a snaking queue of addicts and prostitutes waiting outside Logan's home. "We used to hate having to go there," said one mailman. "It was the part of town that we all dreaded."

In 2001, Logan, a teetotaller, was jailed for three years for a savage attack on a policeman.

A reign of fear and intimidation meant that witnesses did not come forward to ensure the Glaswegian spent more time behind bars.

"Logan was a downright evil character," said an assistant in a shop he visited regularly. "Everyone knew he was the local drug baron and everybody knew how he treated his girlfriends. He beat every one of them black and blue.

"Saranna came into the shop shortly before this happened and she was so bruised and battered you could hardly recognise her."

The shop worker revealed that just a few months ago Logan had beaten another girlfriend so badly that she ended up in hospital.

"He was facing jail so he threatened her life and she was so scared that she dropped the charges. Lassies flocked to him because he had seemingly limitless supplies of drugs."

Neighbours recall a Jekyll and Hyde character, who appeared to have deep-seated psychological problems.

"Logan was a monster but he had a touch of good in him," said one. "If he saw you struggling with shopping he would help out, and as long as you didn't cross him he would leave you alone."

One elderly woman recalled her terror after Logan went on a drug-fuelled rampage a few years ago. "He was hanging out of his window waving a machete in the air and screaming and shouting," she said. "A team of riot police were called from Aberdeen and they were all lined up along the street with their shields.

"He lined his front door with steel panels and the bobbies had a real job before they finally managed to batter it down."

Outside the modest flat, flowers and tributes pile up as white-suited forensic officers attempt to piece together what happened to the ill-fated couple. After being contacted by a concerned friend of Buchan's, police arrived at the flat just after 3pm last Tuesday.

Detective Inspector Phil Chapman, who is leading the inquiry, said: "Clearly something untoward happened in the house and we are working to fill in all the blanks."

Peterhead was once a thriving and prosperous community of around 18,000, driven by its position as the white-fish capital of Europe. The sky-high wages earned by young fishermen drew drug dealers and gangs from across Britain.

The trail of violence and misery that they brought - along with the subsequent collapse of the fishing industry - has left a feeling of decay, which numerous regeneration projects have failed to overcome.

Drug seizures in Grampian are now the highest in the country, and drugs deaths in the region have more than doubled in a year. A total of 48 people died from drugs overdoses in 2006, compared with 23 in 2005.

Long-serving councillor Sam Coull has witnessed the transformation of the area he loves.

"Thirty years ago people never used to lock their doors in Peterhead," he said. "Now people lock their windows and doors and bolt them too.

"The arrival of the oil in the 1970s coincided with a boom time for fishing and a lot of people moved into the area. There were suddenly huge amounts of money in the town that had never been there before.

"The drug problem began because highly paid young fishermen tried to squeeze as much partying as possible into their time onshore. They turned from drink to so-called softer drugs to heroin and it spread out into the community from there.

The Liberal Democrat veteran said the area around Peterhead and neighbouring port Fraserburgh was once Scotland's bible belt, with the God-fearing respecting Sunday as a day of rest.

He said: "That's all gone now and drug use and lawlessness have increased. When a young beauty queen from a good background is beaten to death, you have got to ask what is going on in our society. This is terrible tragedy that could have happened to any family."

The death of the music-loving youngster, who had worked in the town's B&Q store and the Deja Vu nightclub, is made all the poignant by the revelation that she wanted to start afresh.

"Saranna told me that wanted to get off the smack and get her life sorted out," a friend said last week.

"She had organised getting herself into rehab and was looking forward to going. Sadly she never got to take that chance."

Another friend told of how Buchan's mother, Brenda, had battled in vain to save her daughter from an early death.

"Her mother is a lovely woman who had such high hopes for Saranna," she said.

"When she found out about her problems with drugs, she was constantly watching over and trying to make sure she was okay.

"For the past six months up until the final week, her mother was by her side almost constantly. The death of her only daughter will leave her devastated. My heart goes out to her."

Back by the waterfront, just a few hundred metres from where the former Buchan Gala Princess met a barbaric end, clergyman Shaw is looking to the future.

"We are all hurting badly just now, but I am hopeful that something positive can come from this tragedy. Everyone in the town has been stopped in their tracks by this, but it has also pulled us all together.

"While we mourn for these two people, we must remember the role that drugs played in their deaths. People taking drugs often claim they are hurting no one but themselves.

"The great sadness that you can see and feel all around today shows just how untrue this is."


__________________
One of these days.....


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #40 

It is terrible Rossfire, i always remember our back door was always left unlocked when i was young, our next door neighbour loved to bake (her dumplin was amazing ) and she used to leave cakes n biscuits in my mum's kitchen when we were out to suprise us, could you imagine that now, ther'd be no hoose left! 



Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #41 

Madmax that reminded me of a girl i used to know, beautiful girl she was, could've easily been a model and very bright,young cousin of a school pal of mine, similar circumstances lead to her death too. Awful.

madmax

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 971
Reply with quote  #42 
You cant beat the old recipe's eh?
 
(her dumplin was amazing )

__________________
One of these days.....
madmax

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 971
Reply with quote  #43 
Quote:
Originally Posted by steeleyma

Madmax that reminded me of a girl i used to know, beautiful girl she was, could've easily been a model and very bright,young cousin of a school pal of mine, similar circumstances lead to her death too. Awful.

Same through here, young lassies getting caught up in a vicious circle. Really sad times and the parents must be absolutely devastated. The cops cant control the drugs (well some blatantly allow it to be sold) don't you agree with street law and hound the b******s like they do in Ireland?


__________________
One of these days.....


Registered:
Posts: N/A
Reply with quote  #44 

You certainly can't, i mind to my granny used to come over on our birthdays and she'd have the dumplin steaming away in the pillowcase in a big pot..i'm in the mood for dumplin noo!

Rossfife

Registered:
Posts: 242
Reply with quote  #45 

great post mate, such a sad story


__________________
long live street justice
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.