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Admin2

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Reply with quote  #31 

Another message of support for Kevin Lane from those listed here to all the decent people who know that this case stinks!

 

Keep in the FIGHT KEVIN LANE your day will come and that BASTARD SPACKMAN should be strung up from the nearest lamppost!


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Reply with quote  #32 

Indeed Admin2 this XE-POLICE OFFICER holds the KEY to KEVIN LANE'S FREEDOM but he will NEVER admit it even though he has now got a CONVICTION.

 

The REAL problem is that how many others has this REPTILE put behind bars?


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Reply with quote  #33 

Hi Admin2 & Hammer6... thanks for your posts with regards to 'Justice For Kevin Lane'.  It's great to see how many people are supporting Kevin, and long may the support continue until this innocent man has been exonerated of a heinous crime that he did not commit.

 

Indeed, it is a REAL problem that this 'reptile' may have put many other innocent men and women behind bars for crimes they did not commit, but his REAL problem is that we at http://www.ferrisconspiracy.com will continue to uncover and expose these rotten b**tards for what they truly are.  Now, that to them should be a REAL problem, for we will not give up UNTIL JUSTICE IS DONE.


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Reply with quote  #34 

RUBIN "HURRICANE" CARTER

U.S. District Court Judge H. Lee Sarokin  was assigned Carter's Habeas Corpus case. His lengthy decision on November 7, 1985 was in favor of Carter and Artis.

Judge Sarokin quoted extensively from the New Jersey Supreme Court dissenting opinion wherein three of seven judges found the suppressed polygraph evidence would have made a material difference in the outcome of Carter's second trial. Sarokin also made the point that

In fact, Bello never identified Carter and Artis as the murderers.

Judge Sarokin knew the respected Third Circuit Court of Appeals - and possibly the United States Supreme Court - would review his actions. He also knew it was possible the higher courts would find he abused his discretion, but he did what he believed was right.

Immediate release from custody [he set Carter free] with prejudice [meaning the case is over forever] is rarely awarded, and when it is, the appellate courts may find abuse of discretion

Prosecutors filed an Appeal with the Third Circuit. The government also asked the court for an order directing the prison superintendent to keep Carter in prison until the appeal was decided. The reason? Carter was a dangerous man.

The court disagreed, and Carter remained free while the judges decided the state's appeal. The unanimous result could not have been more favorable for Carter. Here is part of what the Third Circuit judges said in their Opinion:

...[U]nder any reasonable characterization of the 1976 trial, the critical importance of Bello's testimony to the prosecution's case clearly looms large and commanding. Bello's eyewitness identification testimony was the only direct evidence placing Carter and Artis at the Lafayette Bar & Grill. Bello's credibility, as well as his opportunity and ability to observe the gunmen at the crime scene, has to be considered an issue that is crucial to the guilt-finding process. We are not confronted by a situation in which the suppressed evidence - here, information impeaching Bello's credibility and challenging his professed vantage point - was of only 'minor importance.' Justice Clifford noted in dissent, and we agree, that a complete account of Harrelson's [the professor's] polygraph examinations and the prosecution's use of his conflicting oral and written conclusions had the real capacity...to bring about the utter destruction of by far the most important witness in the State's arsenal, with the fallout levelling the vaunted polygraphists and casting doubt on the tactics of the prosecution. Never before [this information was uncovered] could defendants argue so persuasively that Bello was in all respects a complete, unvarnished liar, utterly incapable of speaking the truth.

The Third Circuit Court of Appeals confirmed the overturned conviction, and Carter remained a free man. Although the State of New Jersey appealed to the Supreme Court of the United States, the high court did not change the outcome. The final fight ended when prosecutors did not seek a third trial.

A most astonishing event occurred on February 19, 1988. The prosecutor filed a motion to dismiss the original indictments brought against Carter and Artis in 1966. After a 22-year process, all charges were dropped despite the compelling evidence prosecutors had against Carter and despite the fact no appellate court had found him innocent!

The Great Writ of Habeas Corpus had helped Carter and Artis - as it has helped so many people for centuries. As Carter later said:

Habeas corpus isn't just a quaint Latin phrase, it was the key to my freedom.

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Reply with quote  #35 

Hi mactheknife... thank you for an excellent post with regards to Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, and very appropriate to be included in the topic of 'Justice For Kevin Lane'.  Great links too


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Reply with quote  #36 
... Read of your plight on ferrisconspiracy.com keep your head held high and be aware others on the outside have you in ...

http://www.justiceforkevinlane.com/support.asp - 12k - Cached - More pages from this site - Save


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Reply with quote  #37 

 

 

Kevin Lane website

28 July 2003
Murder conviction reviewed by police 

Jailing of corrupt detective raises doubts about 22 cases

By Steven Morris

The case of a man jailed for the murder of a businessman is under review after a senior detective involved in the inquiry was convicted of stealing from his police force, it emerged yesterday.

Kevin Lane, who has always denied murdering businessman Robert Magill, 44, is hoping that the jailing earlier this month of Chris Spackman, who was a detective inspector, will lead to his own acquittal.

His is one of more than 20 cases which Hertfordshire police, the crown prosecution service and the criminal cases review commission (CCRC) are investigating after the conviction of Spackman, who was said in court to have acted like a "seasoned fraudster".

Lane was convicted of shooting Magill as he walked his dog near his home in Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire, in October 1994. Magill was shot five times, twice in the head, at close range.

The police believed Lane, then 26, was a professional hitman paid up to £100,000 to murder Magill. Despite what prosecutors conceded was flimsy evidence, Lane was convicted during his second trial, the first jury having failed to agree on a verdict.

After the case Lane was dubbed "the executioner" by some newspapers and linked to other killings, including that of Charlie Wilson, the great train robber murdered on the Costa del Sol in 1990. One report claimed he had links with the Russian mafia.

After the murder of the television star, Jill Dando, it was claimed - falsely - that detectives went to him to ask whether her killing was the work of a hitman.

Lane, who is regarded by the Home Office as one of Britain's most dangerous men, has long claimed that Spackman, the officer in charge of his case, was determined to convict him at any cost.

Lane believes his name may have been given to the police by the "real" killer. He says his underworld connections and a criminal record allowed the police to fit a case around him.

In a letter seen by the Guardian and sent to the CCRC last month, Lane described Spackman - an ambitious detective sergeant at the time of the Magill murder - as a "corrupt officer, hell bent on forcing a conviction against me".

He said Spackman had told him in the past that he would "have me one day" and claimed the former policeman suppressed vital details which undermined the prosecution's case. He also alleged Spackman put undue pressure on his co-accused, Roger Vincent, who was acquitted of involvement in the murder.

The CCRC confirmed it was examining the Lane case. It could send the case back to the court of appeal. A spokeswoman for Hertfordshire police said 22 cases involving Spackman, who had been a policeman for 26 years, were being examined.

Spackman, 46, was jailed at the Old Bailey for plotting to steal £160,000 from Hertfordshire police, money which had been seized from criminals and was supposed to be used to fight crime.

The court was told how the married father-of-three had diverted money into the building society account of a woman he was besotted with.

He took the woman on a shopping spree in Harrods and on holiday in Mauritius, bought her a £18,000 VW Golf and a £7,000 beautician's course and helped set her up in business.

Crispin Aylett, prosecuting, said: "The lengths he went to, the lies he told and the documents that were forged would have been worthy of a seasoned fraudster."

Judge Brian Barker told Spackman, who admitted conspiracy to steal, theft and misconduct in office, that he was responsible for a "disgusting catalogue of crime and lies".



14 February 2001
Presumed guilty

By Nick Hopkins, Crime Correspondent

Kevin Lane is no angel. As a teenager he was known as Lights Out Lane for his brutal fists. As a nightclub bouncer, he never shirked a fight. But was he really a hitman who killed Great Train Robber Charlie Wilson, and had links to the Russian mob? Nick Hopkins weighs up the evidence

Kevin Lane hasn't had much to be cheerful about over the past seven years, but as we face each other in the cramped, windowless room set aside for visits to high-risk (category double A) inmates, he begins to laugh. The subject is nicknames, the only matter he is prepared to discuss in something more than a whisper.

We are sitting on low chairs around a low table - everything here is bolted to the floor - and we are surrounded by three prison officers. One is within arm's reach. Prisoner BV3290 is, after all, regarded by the Home Office as one of the country's most dangerous men, and security at HMP Frankland in Durham is formidable.

Lane has had several aliases. As a 15-year-old growing up in Harefield, Hertfordshire, it was Lights Out Lane - he was a talented middle-weight boxer who fought for the home counties against the Federal Republic of Germany. Lane raises his left fist, then his right. Both are slightly gnarled. He chirps: "Gelignite - dynamite. Take your pick, 'cos you're going to sleep!"

When he was a 20-year-old businessman who wore designer clothes and drove a Porsche 911 Targa, Lane went by two other nicknames: Catwalk Kev and Mr Particular. There is no reason to ask why. Lane is handsome. His boyish face and broad shoulders make him seem much younger than 33. His dark-blue shirt appears to have been ironed and his shoes polished. But it is by another name that he has become notorious, and this one wipes the smile from his face: the Executioner.

Four years ago, Lane was convicted at the Old Bailey of murdering Robert Magill, a 44-year-old businessman who was gunned down near his home in Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire, as he walked his dog, Oscar, on his way to nearby Chorley Wood Common on October 13, 1994. The jury heard Magill was shot five times, twice in the head, at "very close range".

The judge in his second trial, Neil Denison, described the attack as "desperately violent, shocking, horrifying". With a case that even prosecutors admitted was flimsy, Lane was accused of being a professional hitman who had been paid between £40,000 and £100,000. But that was just the start.

Following his conviction, Lane says he was the victim of a sustained smear campaign. In various newspapers, he was dubbed the Executioner, and linked to other unsolved murders. They included the assassinations of Charlie Wilson, the Great Train Robber targeted on the Costa del Sol in 1990, and Karen Reed, a 33-year-old geophysicist, who was shot on the doorstep of her home in Surrey in April 1994 by a man posing as a pizza delivery rider. One report claimed Lane had also worked to order for the Russian mafia.

When the TV presenter Jill Dando was shot on the doorstep of her home in Fulham in April 1999, Lane's name cropped up again. At the time, detectives wanted advice from expert hitmen. Newspapers said they turned to Lane to ask whether Dando's murder was the work of a professional.

"Nobody from the Dando team came to see me," he says. "It was rubbish, like most of the stuff that has been in the papers. Being wrongly convicted of one was bad enough. Then, overnight, I became a multiple murderer."

Lane says there is another story - his story - and it has only been half told. "Just hear me out," he says. "Then make up your own mind."

During the two visits I have paid him, and in several letters he has sent me from jail, Lane has described his life. He does not pretend he has never been in trouble. He has anecdotes that sound like scenes from Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels. But a killer? "No way."

A prolific hitman?

"It's just nonsense. I'll pick my hands up for a fight, but that's my limit."

He points to the evidence against him for the Magill murder. The prosecution relied on a set of coincidences Lane felt too fearful to explain at the time because he and his 52-year-old mother, Barbara, had been warned "to keep quiet". Lane is planning an appeal with the help of Vicky King, a lawyer with the London firm Thanki Novy Taube. His campaign is building momentum and has been invigorated recently by two very different sources.

The criminal cases review commission, which investigates alleged miscarriages of justice, has launched its own inquiry into the conviction - an unusual, proactive step. Normally, the commission only becomes involved following the rejection of a first appeal. And two criminals, influential figures in north London's underworld, contacted King out of the blue to insist Lane was not the murderer. They are the sort of men who would know.

Listening to Lane talk about his life, it is easy to see why his nicknames never included Lucky. The second eldest of eight children, his parents split up when he was a child. His father, Joseph, died "from drink" nine years ago, aged 44. His mother went abroad for several years when he was a teenager, leaving him in the care of friends. Ask Lane about his childhood and he recalls Special Patrol Group vans lining up outside pubs on his council estate ready for the rucks that started at closing time.

At secondary school in south Ruislip, he fell for a 14-year-old girl called Kim Purcell. This, he says, was the turning point in his life. "Other kids said to me: 'Kev, you know who she is, don't you?' I hadn't the faintest idea. I quickly discovered the Purcell family included some of the main criminals in the area."

Kim's uncle, Pat, the head of the family, who is due to be released from Whitemoor prison later this year, treated Lane like a son, and through the Purcells, Lane was introduced to the fringes of the criminal underworld, learning to survive on his wits and with his fists.

The family gave him work as a doorman, and then sold him a security firm. With Lane in charge - he was still only 18 - it flourished. At its peak, he was pro viding doormen for 12 pubs and six clubs in west London, earning £800 a week - more than enough to keep Kim and their two sons, Tommy and Aaron.

Lane is short for a bouncer - 5ft 11in - but those who worked for him say he was one of the best in the business. "There are advantages in being my size. When you approach a man who is 6ft 6in and ask him to calm down, he's not likely to feel threatened.

"But if someone wanted a fight, I could take care of myself. I was very quick. If a man came at me with a knife, I'd have a go. If he came at me with a gun, I'd still have a go. To be honest, I've never needed to carry a weapon."

Lane remembers once being on the door of a pub called the Firefly in Hayes, Middlesex. There had been trouble earlier in the day and the landlord wanted emergency cover. As Lane stood outside, a car slowed down and a man called out: "Do you want some of this?"

"He pointed a shotgun at me," says Lane. "He said he was going to kill me. I replied: 'Go on then.' And he bloody shot me! I didn't even know the kid. I ducked and several shotgun pellets shaved the top of my head. I've got still got six in my skull. I've never seen the guy since."

Some who crossed Lane learned the hard way. He and two others kidnapped a man they suspected of stealing £100,000 worth of electrical equipment. "We put a car on his legs and threw him in the Grand Union Canal. But we weren't going to kill him! We just roughed him up a bit." For that assault, Lane spent 14 months in prison - his only term before the Magill murder.

A year after his release, Lane had left door work and was making a good living through a range of business ventures ranging from organising raves to selling vacuum cleaners. But his life was about to change again.

He broke up with Kim and, in the spring of 1994, left the UK for Tenerife, where a friend had offered him work. Kim followed him and pleaded with him to return, which he did on September 29 - her birthday. Back at home in Potton, Cambridgeshire, Lane got in touch with his relatives and friends - hardly, he points out, a sensible thing for an assassin to do.

By then, Magill, a car trader and known villain, had been warned that there was a contract on his head. But he had made so many enemies, he didn't know where the threat came from. He became a prisoner in his own heavily protected home in Valley Road, Rickmansworth, venturing out once a day to take his dog for a walk. During his stroll at 8.20am on Thursday October 13, two men got out of a battered X-registered BMW as he approached the junction with Berry Lane. One shot him five times with a pump-action weapon, the other kept look-out.

The case against Lane, who was arrested three months after the murder, was based on one piece of forensic evidence found in the car, and several coincidences.

People who knew Lane were undoubtedly involved in the murder. The weekend before the assassination, Lane borrowed a BMW from a friend - his own car had been stolen - and used it to take Kim and the boys to see his mother, who had moved to Hillingdon. He said he returned it on Sunday evening. Four days later it was used by the killers as their getaway vehicle. When detectives recovered the car, they found Lane's fingerprint on a binliner in the boot. Scientists also found firearms discharge on a piece of plastic piping, and speculated that it had contained a weapon of some sort.

Lane never denied driving the car - his sons' fingerprints were all over the dashboard. "But I didn't have it the day Magill died. I used it once, that's all."

Lane says he knew something was up because he was called hours after the murder by a criminal contact who warned him that the police might pay a visit. "He didn't say anything else. He said there was nothing to worry about. I wasn't going to hang around for a knock on the door, so I took Kim and the kids to Newcastle for a short break."

To detectives, who had launched a huge investigation, his trip to the north-east pointed to his involvement in the murder. Lane's decision not to tell them about the call hardly helped. Nor did he tell them that his mother had also been threatened by a motorcycle rider who appeared at her front door one morning, warning her and Kevin to keep quiet.

The police had two other clues. Shortly after the murder, Lane bought a car for £5,400. Detectives speculated the money was part of his payment, though admitted there was no proof. Lane said it was money he had left in a safe before going to Tenerife, and that he had witnesses to back his story. Officers also discovered Lane flew back to the UK using an exit visa with the name Paul Curtis."We suspected he'd been recruited when he was in Tenerife and returned to do this specific job," says one detective involved in the inquiry. "As far as we were concerned, the pieces of the jigsaw had fallen into place."

Lane insists they jumped to the wrong conclusion. He says he couldn't return to the UK using his real passport because he was in trouble with the Spanish police over a brawl in a restaurant called The Steak House. However, again he didn't tell detectives about the fight.

After consulting with his then lawyers, Lane decided not to tell the jury about his connections to the underworld, a tactic he now considers a huge misjudgment. Instead, the defence focused on the major flaws in the prosecution. There were, for instance, two eyewitnesses to Magill's shooting, but neither picked out Lane at identity parades. Strangely, all the early police messages - reports from informants about likely suspects - made no mention of Lane. Two other names cropped up time and again.

How the police came to look at Lane in the first place has never been fully explained, and is an important avenue for Lane's new solicitor. Their suspicion is that his name was forwarded by the killer to cover himself. Even the police admit they were lucky to convict.

The jury failed to reach a verdict on Lane the first time round and his co-defendant Roger Vincent was acquitted. A retrial was ordered. A second jury deliberated for nine hours and three minutes before reaching a majority decision that Lane was guilty. He was sentenced to a minimum of 18 years, and has been told he will serve at least 25. He has lost Kim, who has re-married, and he hardly sees his sons.

"Kevin Lane has not lived a crime-free life, but is he a contract killer? I am convinced that he is not," says King. "His lifestyle allowed the police to fit a case around him. His fear of those who told him to keep his mouth shut conspired to prevent him from telling the jury about his background. If he had not had any underworld connections, then he would not be where he is now. It would have been impossible to make the case stick."

Lane has not been charged with any other murders since he was in prison, and detectives now admit there is no concrete evidence to link him to any other shooting.

"If I had killed Magill, I would have got out of the country immediately," Lane says, "I wouldn't have hung around and bought a new car. All the way through the trial, people were saying to me: 'Don't worry, Kev, they've nothing on you, you'll get off.' And I believed them. Now I'm locked up for something I didn't do, and I've been accused of murders all over the place.

"I'm not a grass, but I've been inside far too long. I'm not going to give up. I know I can prove my innocence."


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Reply with quote  #38 

Hi Admin2... thanks for your excellent post with regards to 'Kevin Lane'.  Reading through the content of your post, I was deeply saddened to read about the obvious miscarriage of justice that this man has suffered, and the obvious involvement of a seriously corrupt officer.

 

I sincerely hope that one day soon, Kevin gets the justice he so rightfully deserves, and the fact that he is quoted as saying he will not give up, it is obvious that this man has a huge amount of strength and determination - even after all that he has suffered at the hands of a corrupt system.

 

I sincerely hope he doesn't give up, because those who truly believe in his innocence won't ever give up believing in him.


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Admin2

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Reply with quote  #39 

Hi Admin, Kevin Lane is no HIT MAN and people in London know who the real killers are and it has all the hallmarks of another TC Campbell & Joe Steele written all over it.

 

Both TC & Joe were fighting to prove their innocence NOT someone else's guilt as is the position with Kevin Lane.

 

EXTRACTS FROM PREVIOUS POST:

Lane has not been charged with any other murders since he was in prison, and detectives now admit there is no concrete evidence to link him to any other shooting.

"If I had killed Magill, I would have got out of the country immediately," Lane says, "I wouldn't have hung around and bought a new car. All the way through the trial, people were saying to me: 'Don't worry, Kev, they've nothing on you, you'll get off.' And I believed them. Now I'm locked up for something I didn't do, and I've been accused of murders all over the place.

"I'm not a grass, but I've been inside far too long. I'm not going to give up. I know I can prove my innocence."


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Reply with quote  #40 

Hi Admin2 and all. I have spent some time reading all the articles on the http://www.justiceforkevinlane.com website.

 

The conviction of Kevin Lane was based on the evidence given, provided by or involved DS Spackman who was also the officer in charge of the case/disclosure of evidence to the defence. The court took the view that DS Spackman, being a Police officer, was telling the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. However, DS Spackman has since been found guilty of dishonesty and theft in a seperate case and received a four year prison sentence.

 

There is no evidence, independent of evidence given/provided by DS Spackman, against Kevin Lane to find him guilty of the murder + the fact that DS Spackman was and is a corrupt police officer = UNSAFE CONVICTION!

 

 

Kevin Lane should be released NOW and not a moment longer.

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Reply with quote  #41 

Indeed Magpie........

 

We have been instructed by witnesses that the BMW was in fact parked inside Lasers workshop at the rear with damaged vehicles blocking it in, in case of break-ins. This evidence along with police evidence proves his story to be false. Why would police photographs put the BMW inside Lasers workshop, place several damaged and broken down vehicles in front of the BMW, only to reverse the exact same procedure to remove the BMW to the police station which they duly did.

I now require you offices assistance in accordance with your duty to investigate the officers who have conspired with Mr Spackman and clearly lied to assist MR Spackman’s corrupt actions, which also now makes them corrupt.



Watford Magistrates have recently replied to inform Kevin that the warrant has been "destroyed". It would have been damming for Spackman if there was no warrant or that it was dated the day before he said he followed the BMW.


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Reply with quote  #42 

INNOCENT - Fighting miscarriages of justice

The criminal cases review commission, which investigates alleged miscarriages of justice, has launched its own inquiry into the conviction - an unusual, ...
http://www.innocent.org.uk/cases/kevinlane/index.html - 22k - Cached - Similar pages


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Reply with quote  #43 

After reading Kevin's case I was left disgusted.....the more people know what is really going on in the UK with POLICE CORRUPTION the better!

 

Paul Ferris will keep on writing about it of that I am sure

 

Kevin Lane website


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Reply with quote  #44 

well said admin2,you just wonder if the police feel guilty in this matter regarding kevin,knowing fine well that hes innocent,why dont they just own up and say we got this wrong,but on the other hand that would make the bas*ards look weak,but we already know the fuc*ers are weak,they should give this guy his life back

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Reply with quote  #45 

A very sad tale about a very strong man Frankie and unfortunately the perverse nature of justice in the England never mind Scotland is that the cop who fabricated Kevin was sentenced to 5 YEARS on other matters unrelated to Kevin's case.

 

 


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