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Snoop Dogg, Kurupt, Nate Dogg [comp][wave][cool]




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EXCLUSIVE: The Sayers – Tried & Tested at the Highest Level

Pt.1


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new kid on the scene ...... OUTSIDER  [comp][thumb][wave]......Check it here> 





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I did order mine ...... or do we get signed ones P [confused][biggrin][comp][thumb]

http://www.unfinishedbusiness.scot

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pre-ordercoverimage.jpg 

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A selection of links selected by Paul Ferris:   [comp][thumb][thumb]
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More Links for archiving}
 

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The Ferris ConspiracyVendetta: Turning Your Back on Crime Can be DeadlyVillains: It Takes One to Know One...Deadly Divisions: The Spectre Chronicles 
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Great intro to the new edition P [comp][thumb][comp][wave]This explosive book takes up where the late Reg McKay left off. Paul Ferris sets the record straight in his no-holds-barred account of his past criminal life, emerging as a true survivor in what was (literally) a cut throat business. An uncompromising story of a life of crime, the aftermath of leaving that life behind has followed Ferris like a black cloud. Putting those demons to rest and elaborating on The Ferris Conspiracy, Paul delivers another true story of power, corruption and the struggle to survive in one of our toughest cities.

[UnfinishedBusiness]

UNFINISHED BUSINESS
PAUL FERRIS WITH STEVE WRAITH AND STU WHEATMAN [biggrin][sneaky][comp][eek][wink][comp][thumb]


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Saw this the other day P > [rolleyes][rofl][comp][sneaky][thumb]

Stephen McGinty: Glasgow gangster film shot down The Wee Man's chronicle of Paul Ferris' life lacks the iconic Glasgow scenery. Published: 00:00 Saturday 19 January 2013

Film-makers behind the biopic of notorious Glasgow hood Paul Ferris were not exactly welcomed with open arms in the Dear Green Place, writes Stephen McGinty THE cineaste who this weekend wishes their violence and cursing to be home-grown as opposed to American and so opts for The Wee Man over Django Unchained will strain to recognise any of the Dear Green Place in the biopic of Paul Ferris, the notorious Glasgow gangster. While there are plenty of stabbings, shootings and enough “f” and “c” words to make even Quentin Tarantino wince, not to mention the surprise presence of a homicidal dwarf, there are few gritty shots of Glasgow. This is because the producers realised they were far from welcome and moved south. This week, Strathclyde Police and Glasgow City Council have used near identical words stating: “We didn’t try to ban the film and any suggestion that we did would be inaccurate.”


A spokesman for Glasgow City Council went on to say that the producers approached the Glasgow Film Office, which is a wing of the city council. “We told the producer that GFO did not have the authority to approve locations, but did describe in which ways we do help productions. We gave contact details for the police, but provided no further assistance.”  Proposed by Trentino However, it seems that a decision was taken by Glasgow City Council not to offer the film-makers the same level of assistance routinely offered to any other production. If so, the question is: who made that decision? And why? In an e-mail to one of the film’s producers, Clive Waldron, film commissioner Jennifer Reynolds did state the ways in which the Glasgow Film Office can assist productions – but then went on to explain, as the producers read it, that it was a facility they would not be extending to The Wee Man. The e-mail explained: “Glasgow Film Office is the film commission for Glasgow and is part of Glasgow City Council.


Generally, we are the first point of contact for all productions hoping to film in the city and our assistance centres around locations and logistical advice. We do not give permission for filming in any properties or outdoor spaces, but we can point location managers in the right direction for seeking permissions or arranging any activity which is likely to impact on everyday city functions.” She then went on to state: “The remit of Glasgow Film Office is to maximise filming activity in the city but in this case we cannot help you.” A few days later, on 6 December, 2010, the film-makers made a written request for assistance to Stephen House, chief constable of Strathclyde Police, whose secretary wrote to the producer Michael Loveday to say that he had passed the request on to Fiona Taylor, assistant chief constable for operational support, who would contact the film-makers in due course. Four days later, the film-makers received a letter from the assistant chief constable which read: “I am in receipt of your letter and attached production notes from 6 December 2010. After careful consideration of the subject matter, I must inform you that I do not feel it is appropriate for Strathclyde Police to assist in facilitating its production.” She then, in a subtle manner, showed them the door: “I should not like to advise you on the merits or otherwise of producing the film in Glasgow, that I feel is a matter for you and your colleagues.” You can imagine the assistant chief constable making a similar statement to a drunken rabble: “I should not like to advise you on the merits of taking one step closer, that I feel is a matter for you and your colleagues.”

So did, Glasgow City Council and Strathclyde Police “ban” the film? No, but they made it difficult for the producers to shoot, OK, let’s not use that word, to film in Glasgow. I can see why Strathclyde Police would have no wish to assist in any possible way with a biopic about one of the city’s most notorious gangsters. You can understand the chief constable wishing to avoid the bitter irony of having police officers stopping traffic to allow the director to reconstruct the brutal murder of Arthur “Fat Boy” Thompson Jnr, a case Strathclyde Police believed they cracked, only to watch a jury refuse to convict the prime suspect, Paul Ferris. As for Glasgow City Council, why should taxpayers’ money facilitate a movie which may serve to boost the ego and notoriety of a gangster that brought misery and fear to so many of its citizens? It is a legitimate argument and one I only wish someone in the council was able to articulate.

If these decisions are taken on our behalf, I believe we have the right to know the manner in which they were made and by whom. Brian Ferguson: Why Outlaw King tourist invasion could change Scotland Then again, I can also see why Glasgow City Council prefers to give the impression that assistance was offered and say nothing while privately suggesting that this is all a “publicity stunt” to put bums on cinema seats this weekend. Why give the film the “oxygen of publicity”? My own view is that by being obstructive, Strathclyde Police and Glasgow City Council have set a precedent on the type of films welcome in the city. If you are a Hollywood studio and you wish to turn Glasgow into Philadelphia and unleash hundreds of zombies, as was the case with World War Z, or film car chases up and down the Broomielaw for Fast and the Furious 6, the door is open. If you are a small production company wanting to make a film about Glasgow’s violent criminal underworld, the door is also open – if it is clearly a work of fiction. The Big Man, starring Liam Neeson and based on William McIlvanney’s novel, had no problem with permits or assistance from Strathclyde Police. If, however, you are a small production company wanting to make a film about Glasgow’s violent criminal underworld and it is based on real events, you could be in trouble. The closest parallel to The Wee Man was in 1979 when STV made A Sense of Freedom about the life of Jimmy Boyle.

This was before the creation of dedicated film offices, when the authorities’ displeasure was demonstrated by fire engines that turned up in middle-of-the-night shoots, then parked in front of the camera, thunderous editorials of condemnation from newspapers, and previously agreed locations turning out to be padlocked and guarded by police officers. Today A Sense of Freedom is highly regarded and pulled in a massive TV audience when screened on its 30th anniversary. Had Martin Scorsese been a Glaswegian, the Glasgow Film Council would no doubt have turned him away if he arrived clutching the script for a Scottish Goodfellas. I’ll wager that there are a few police officers and councillors who count Goodfellas as one of their favourite films. We love movies about American hoods and gangsters, the only difference between their life of crime and those of our hoods is distance and geography. In New Jersey there will be people who despise Robert de Niro’s character Jimmy Conway as much as some people in Glasgow despise Paul Ferris. The fact is there is no denying the potential for drama in the relationship between Arthur Thompson, the licensee and Paul Ferris and the drug deals, murders and extortions that rippled through the city in the 1980s and 1990s.

In any other country these events would already have been turned into a film or television drama, and if it had been filmed in any other country and involved their real-life gangsters as opposed to our own, we would watch and enjoy. There will be those who argue that there is a world of difference in quality between Goodfellas and The Wee Man and I wouldn’t argue, but the fact is that when the Glasgow Film Council was saying “we cannot help you” it didn’t know how good or bad it would be, the content was enough for it to close the door. The consequence of the decision was a loss of work for Scottish film crews. The producers had planned to rent offices and studio space for six weeks of pre-production followed by a six-week shoot in Glasgow, with a potential spend of £2.5 million. Instead they filmed in Glasgow for just two days, largely establishing shots that required neither the assistance of the police, or the council, with the majority of time and cash spent in London.
Glasgow is a city that loves going to the movies, as the launch of the Glasgow Film Festival this week illustrated, and we’ll have to wait and see how the film plays.

On one level you could imagine Le Petit Garçon would have been a great movie to open the festival, if, that is, Paul Ferris was French and the film had subtitles.


Read more at: https://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/culture/film/stephen-mcginty-glasgow-gangster-film-shot-down-1-2746809

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Here P this is one I emailed you about. Did you have dealings with CI Mike Riddell former chief inspector with Strathclyde Polis and is he in your new book[confused]

FROM BODY BAGS TO THE BOX OFFICE

Does a film about gangland’s Paul Ferris glamorise his violent and bloody past, asks GAVIN MADELEY

[image]Partners in crime: Paul Ferris, left, on set with Martin Compston, who plays him in The Wee Man

THIS week, Glasgow witnesses an unholy clash of cultures. One of its plushest hotels is due to host an advance screening of a new movie about the life of one of the city’s most notorious gangsters.

During his obscenely violent career as an enforcer for infamous ‘ businessman’ Arthur Thompson, Paul Ferris would rarely have troubled the doors of such establishments.

Yet, on Tuesday, members of the press have been invited to the fivestar Blythswood Hotel to watch a new biopic detailing the stabbings and shootings that went with Ferris’ brutal rise to prominence.

If the slickly produced publicity for The Wee Man is anything to go by, the film strays dangerously close to wallowing in gangland gore.

Featuring a host of household names, including Martin Compston and Denis Lawson, the dramatic trailer features a thumping soundtrack, flashing blades and buckets of blood.

The film’s backers, Carnaby International, will doubtless hope the media event produces some positive press after a difficult conception, during which Ferris has been widely accused of cashing in on his crimes.

The film-makers were even forced to recreate scenes on a London set after being banned from the streets of Glasgow.

Both police and councillors voiced objections over the subject matter. Then again, why would they want to assist in producing a film that would immortalise on screen a man whose notoriety is based purely on his reputation for dishing out bloody retribution? Someone, indeed, who is suspected of involvement in some of Glasgow’s most i nfamous unsolved gangland crimes, including murder.

Ferris, 49 this month, claims to have turned his back on his former

‘His life is only noteworthy for law-breaking’

life. But with a screenplay based on his own autobiography, The Ferris Conspiracy, and the charismatic Compston, star of Ken Loach’s drama Sweet Sixteen, playing him as a young man, the suspicion is that this film could prove little more than a self-justification exercise.

Mike Riddell, a former chief inspector with Strathclyde Police, is one who remains sceptical about the £3million movie’s intentions.

He said yesterday: ‘Paul Ferris is a very bad man. If this film glorified his life as a viable alternative lifestyle, then I would be concerned.

‘His life is only noteworthy because of his violence and his law-breaking. If he had gone to school and been a plumber or a brickie, of course nobody would have been interested in him.

‘If the film shows any kind of regret or offers any kind of example to young people that this is not the way to go, then fair enough, but I suspect it’s not going to do that.

‘I suspect that youngsters may look at it and say, : “That’s how he made his name. Maybe I’ve got a chance”.’

Director Ray Burdis, a veteran of big screen gangster chic movies including The Krays in the 1990s, maintains The Wee Man has a serious point to make as an exploration of how ‘an environment and bullying could affect a child’s destiny’. He said: ‘If Paul Ferris was born in Oxford, he would have lived a very different lifestyle than he has.’

He added: ‘All films do glamorise violence. I once made a film about the Kray twins and, yes, it glamorises them – but it also tells a tale. So what do you do – take out the violence and stick your head in the sand or show it as it is?’

It is certainly true that Paul Ferris had an atrocious start to life – born in 1963 into a family that was no stranger to crime, he fell victim to an appalling cycle of bullying from a rival clan which almost ended his life prematurely.

It instilled in him a burning desire for vengeance, which fuelled, in turn, his lust for violence.

He was the youngest of four children growing up in Blackhill in Glasgow’s East End. Built in the 1950s, the drab grey clutch of masonry had become one of the UK’s most deprived and lawless housing schemes.

His father Willie was a bank robber and in 1977, when Paul was just into his teens, his older brother Billy was convicted of murder after stabbing a man to death in a pub fight. Billy was jailed for life for a second time in 2004 after killing a 15-year-old boy with a knife.

In his memoirs, Ferris claimed his own life changed direction dramatically when he was systematically bullied and beaten as a skinny nineyear-old by the Welsh brothers, who terrorised Blackhill.

When he refused to give in to the brothers, they hung him from a tree when he was 12 years old and left him for dead.

He blames their bullying for leaving him with a lifelong skin disease, psoriasis. It also left him with a taste for retribution. Throughout his teens, Ferris made it his mission to exact revenge on every one of the Welsh boys, almost ‘scalping’ one with a blade. He once said: ‘Glasgow was awash with gangsters and bullies. To me, the two are one and the same.

‘I’m neither a gangster nor a bully, but that doesn’t mean people can step on your toes. For if they do, you have to jump on their neck and break it.’

It was exactly that calculating coldness that doubtless attracted the attention of Arthur Thompson Snr, at the time the undisputed godfather of organised crime in Glasgow.

In the East End, gangland bosses ruled the back streets and were always on the lookout for violent young thugs to enforce their reign on l ocal businesses and rival criminals.

After leaving St Roch’s Secondary with no qualifications, Ferris had taken a £180-a-week job at a brewery to please his mother Jenny, but he was drawn to the bigger rewards – and risks – offered by crime.

A string of convictions for petty theft and assaults, combined with a savage violent streak, a quick mind and no little charm, impressed Thompson Snr.

A close friend of the Kray twins, Thompson Snr, who died of a heart attack in 1993 aged 61, first made his mark on Glasgow’s underworld in the 1950s before running organised crime for the next 30 years.

He ruled his empire from the Provanmill Inn, only yards from his home, a converted council house known as the Ponderosa because of its over-the-top styling.

At the age of 16, Ferris became a leg-man for the Thompson firm and quickly established himself as a fearless thief. Although not physically intimidating, the young thug had no qualms about using extreme violence – but despite being linked to stabbings, slashings, blindings and knee-cappings, nothing of any significance was pinned on him.

At 20, Ferris was charged with four counts of attempted murder after shots were fired at members of the rival Devlin crime family as they headed home from a night at the pub. Despite being picked out at an

identity parade as the man who fired the shots, Ferris was acquitted of all charges at his trial seven months later.

‘I’ve always used a weapon,’ he once boasted, ‘whether it be a baseball bat or a knife. If anyone was born to crime, it was me. Crime’s in my blood.’

He quickly graduated to become Thompson Snr’s right-hand man and the pair would sit around the tables of the Provanmill Inn planning robberies and other crimes.

Also present were two more of the most brutal and feared of Glasgow’s warlords, Tam ‘ The Licensee’ McGraw – then a close ally of Ferris – and Thompson Snr’s son, Arthur Jnr, known as ‘Fat Boy’.

But such alliances always proved uneasy – and as Glasgow’s lucrative heroin market flourished in the early 1980s, the ambitious Ferris was secretly organising his own criminal operations under the cover of apparently legitimate business interests.

One of Ferris’ own musclemen, James McLean, has spoken of working as a hired assassin for mutual contacts in the London underworld, shooting dead at least two people for thousands of pounds.

In the late 1980s, Ferris and McGraw’s relationship soured when Ferris accused his former ally of setting him up in a drugs bust.

Thompson Jnr was also becoming increasingly jealous of Ferris’ closeness to his father. In August 1991, he famously read out a ‘hit list’ of enemies he wanted to eliminate, which included Ferris. Hours later, however, it was young Thompson who was shot dead outside the family home.

Ferris was arrested and later

‘There is just one option open to me – to go straight’

charged with the murder. On the day of Thompson Jnr’s funeral, a car was found containing the bodies of two friends of Ferris, Bobby Glover and Joe ‘Bananas’ Hanlon, who were also suspected of involvement i n his death. The bullet wounds i ndicated a gangland ‘execution’.

Ferris’ appearance at the High Court in Glasgow in 1992 became, at the time, Scotland’s longest murder trial, lasting 54 days and costing an estimated £4million. Thompson Snr was one of 300 witnesses who gave evidence against his former ally. In the end, Ferris was sensationally acquitted.

The jury also rejected several other charges of supplying heroin, cocaine and ecstasy, attempting to murder Thompson Snr, illegal possession of a firearm and kneecapping or threatening to murder other underworld figures.

The court had also heard of another side of Glasgow, including extraordinary claims of contract killings, drive-by shootings, drug smuggling, corrupt police officers and protection rackets.

Ferris emerged from court surrounded by supporters amid triumphalist scenes which enraged police officers still furious at the not guilty verdict.

Intriguingly, this is the point at which The Wee Man concludes. There is a small coda at the end, inviting the audience to make up its own mind about what the future might hold in store for Paul Ferris – which is rather odd, because we actually know how his life turned out.

He did not take the opportunity to turn away from crime, but set himself up first as a car dealer and then as a ‘ security expert’, while maintaining his underworld links.He later avoided a prison sentence for possession of crack cocaine, convincing a jury in Manchester that he was taking the drug to improve his skin condition.

But his luck finally ran out in 1998, when he was jailed for seven years at the Old Bailey in London after being caught red-handed trafficking guns and explosives.

He served four years and shortly before his release in January 2002 issued a statement saying: ‘There is just one option open to me when I get out of prison – to go straight.’

Since then, Ferris has remained at liberty and currently lives with his wife Carolyn and their young family in a secluded £500,000 farmhouse in Ayrshire.

He has co-written several books with the late crime journalist Reg McKay and has worked as a ‘consultant’ for Frontline Security, which ran into trouble in 2004 when it emerged that it had been paid taxpayers’ money to protect Dumbarton Sheriff Court. Court bosses later dispensed with the firm’s services.

Ferris has often been accused of profiting from his crimes, but when news broke that his memoirs were attracting interest from movie- makers, he declared that any money he stood to make from film rights would be donated to charity.

He said: ‘The movie is just that, it’s a movie. It’s not a documentary.’

Ferris was apparently keen for Robert Carlyle to play him in the film. But Carlyle turned the role down and the deal collapsed.

Both Ferris and director Mr Burdis say the film, which is due for release in mid- January, is intended as a cautionary tale. Ferris even claims he wants to set up a charity to help deter people from a life of crime.

Mr Burdis said: ‘The Paul Ferris story is of a young lad trying to grow up in a tough environment. I’ve had long chats with Paul and, yeah, he reckons he and a lot of his friends would have undoubtedly fallen into the role of criminality – but the bullying was a big factor in his life, making his childhood unbearable.

‘At the age of 16, when the worm turned and he was on top, he found it easier to cope with. But without the bullying, things might have turned out differently.’

Ferris may well have been a victim of sorts. But the reality is that he chose a life of crime and fully embraced its world of violence – often botched, frequently bloody, usually cowardly.

And what kind of a lesson is that?




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Great patter P and keep this rollin for now [comp][comp][wave]

I’d love to make Wee Man 2…if the cops let us film it this time

Says Ray Burdis

DEFIANT movie bosses are in talks with former hood Paul Ferris about making a sequel to his controversial screen biopic The Wee Man.

Ray Burdis, who wrote and directed the gangland film, says he wants to shoot a follow-up to the cult hit that divided the country when it was released in January.

And the 55-year-old told The Scottish Sun he hopes to film it in Ferris’s home city of Glasgow — after police chiefs BANNED the first movie.

Speaking at the launch of BAFTA Scotland’s Cineworld Audience Award, he said: “We’re talking about it.

“We all said, ‘Let’s see how this goes and we’ll look at it.’ There are so many angles we could explore.

“It doesn’t need to be a film solely about Paul — you could dip in and out of gangs who were around at that time.

“Maybe the police will let us film here this time.”

The cockney reckons a sequel could be an even bigger hit than the original, starring Martin Compston as Ferris and John Hannah as rival Tam “The Licensee” McGraw.

His only fear is that Compston — praised by critics for his performance — won’t sign up for a second flick.

Ray, who also made The Krays movie starring Spandau Ballet duo Martin and Gary Kemp, said: “A lot of actors, quite rightly, are sceptical about sequels.

“The second one can sometimes take the shine off a performance and they don’t want to ruin the memory of the first one. I’m looking for a different angle on the film.

“To be honest, I don’t think playing Paul again would interest Martin. He’s a thinking actor and he’s very choosy.”

The movie ended with Ferris, now 49, being found not guilty of murdering Arthur ‘Fat Boy’ Thompson Jnr.

Ray added: “I could’ve taken it on more but there’s definitely another film there. It’s a real possibility.

‘Where do you draw the line?’

“There is another story to be told and there’s a lot more detail to explore, more intriguing stuff.”

The Wee Man became Scotland’s most controversial film in decades when cops and Glasgow City Council refused to approve filming.

It was also met with opposition by those caught in Ferris’s criminal past.

The ex-gangland enforcer, who rose to become one of the country’s most feared underworld figures, now lives the quiet life in Ayrshire with his family.

Married dad-of-two Ray said: “Some people said we glamorised crime but people make films about the mafia who go around killing people and win Oscars for them. Where do you draw the line?

“The people who didn’t want the movie to do well got it wrong.

“The minute you start to tell people they shouldn’t be watching this or that, they want to see it straight away.

“When The Krays was out, an outrage story about the film got top billing on the ITV News at Ten. That was £100,000 worth of advertising.”

He has no regrets — apart from Patrick Bergin’s shocking IRISH accent as he portrayed feared Glasgow gangland godfather Arthur Thompson.

Ray said: “I didn’t think anyone outside of Scotland would notice it.

“I met him in a bar and it sounded all right to me. Then I got the Scottish actors in and they said he sounded Irish!”

He’s buzzing but surprised The Wee Man has been nominated for BAFTA Scotland’s audience gong.

Ray says: “It’s a huge honour. I took a few blows making this film so it’s a lovely feeling even if we don’t win.

“I’m happy we’ve been recognised.”

marc.deanie@the-sun.co.uk


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