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http://www.vnunet.com/2151977

 

A recent 'beauty contest' for female bloggers has attracted huge attention and aroused fierce controversy in China
'Hedgehog Mumu' won the most votes, but was shut out of the prizes after she posted erotic photos on her blog
Click Here!
R E L A T E D   C O N T E N T
 

Nude bloggers upset China beauty contest

Chinese blog company refuses to remove 'immoral' photos

Simon Burns in Taipei, vnunet.com 25 May 2006
Click Here!Click Here!Click Here!

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JIHAD BLOG..

 

Jihad Watch News Editor Marisol Seibold has done yeoman work holding the fort while I have been making my way through the Badlands for the last week and a half. I am sorry to be a bit late posting this due to my travels, but it is too important to let pass. From Reuters:

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Bush vowed on Tuesday to prevent al Qaeda from setting up a violent, radical Islamic empire based in Iraq, which he said was Osama bin Laden's ultimate goal.

"We know what the terrorists intend to do because they've told us -- and we need to take their words seriously," Bush said in a speech liberally laced with quotes from bin Laden, architect of the September 11 attacks five years ago which killed around 3,000 people.

Addressing the Military Officers Association of America, Bush said Islamic radicals would like to obtain nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction in order to "blackmail the free world and spread their ideologies of hate."

"If we retreat from Iraq, if we don't uphold our duty to support those who are desirous to live in liberty 50 years from now, history will look back on our time with unforgiving clarity and demand to know why we did not act," Bush said.

"I'm not going to allow this to happen and no future American president can allow it either," he said.

Bush quoted extensively from bin Laden's videotaped messages and writings, comparing him to 20th century dictators like Russia's Vladimir Lenin and Germany's Adolf Hitler.

BIN LADEN LETTER

He cited in particular a letter from bin Laden to the former Taliban ruler, Mullah Omar, that coalition forces found in Afghanistan in 2002.

Bin Laden wrote that al Qaeda should launch a media campaign to tell Americans "their government would bring them more losses, in finances and in casualties," and that they are being sacrificed for big investors, "especially the Jews."

Bush said al Qaeda's vision was to create a "unified totalitarian Islamic state that can confront and eventually destroy the free world."

It is good of him to acknowledge this. It has yet to be established that there is significant, organized, and numerous Islamic opposition to this project. After all, the Iraqi Constitution already establishes Sharia as the highest law of the land. Is that not a step toward this goal?

Bin Laden has declared Iraq "the capital of the caliphate," said Bush, who has often faced criticism for trying to tie Iraq into the broader "war on terrorism."

Massachusetts Democratic Sen. John Kerry, the losing presidential candidate in 2004, responded that if Bush had killed bin Laden in late 2001, "he wouldn't have to quote this barbarian's words today."

"Afghanistan is slipping back into chaos, Pakistan is one coup away from becoming a radical Islamic state with nuclear weapons, Iran is closer to a nuclear arsenal, and Iraq has become a recruitment poster for terror," Kerry said.

Appeasement-minded withdrawal and quixotic democracy planting are both out of focus. Resisting and defeating the jihad should be the goal, and the cornerstone of American strategizing.


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8 September 2006
FILM BOSS REELS OVER CASH ROW...

AN ANGRY film director told last night how lack of support in Scotland has forced him to take a £6million movie abroad.

Award-winning film-maker Lee Hutcheon wanted to base his new project, the story of legendary safecracker Johnny Ramensky, in his homeland.

But he will now split the filming between Ireland, Romania and Bulgaria.

Aberdeen-based Hutcheon, 32, said: "Scotland really has to look at why it has lost so many films in the past 20 years.

"There is a real lack of backing. I'm so down about this."

He added: "These other countries have shown such great enthusiasm and that is all I really wanted.

"Scotland has always been too busy squabbling with itself and getting nowhere. We are such a cynical nation about things like this."

One of Hutcheon's previous movies, In AMan's World, won the best feature drama award at the New York Independent Film Festival.

He said his new project, due to start filming next year, would have created work for 300 people in Scotland and places for 30 movie trainees.

A spokeswoman for funding body Scottish Screen denied Hutcheon's claims of lack of backing. She said the agency spent £6million a year helping film and TV productions, but added: "Obviously, we cannot support every application."

Ramensky, known as Gentleman Johnny, was a hero to many in the 1930s for his daring escapes from jail. He later became a war hero, using his safe-breaking skills against the Nazis.

Robert Carlyle is rumoured to be on the shortlist to play him in the film.


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6 September 2006
THREE OF MY BROTHERS WENT TO JAIL, I WENT TO JAIL. MY SISTER WENT TO JAIL ABOUT FIFTY TIMES..
How Hollywood star Mark escaped a life of crime
 

AT 35, actor Mark Wahlberg is no longer just a Hollywood pretty boy.

Ten years ago, if people wanted to see him, it was mainly in his underwear.

A former rapper, first with his brother Donnie in New Kids On The Block and then with his own rapper band, Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch, his Calvin Klein underwear poster was a million seller.

That's all behind him now, but the new dad - son Mike was born in March and he already has a two-year-daughter called Ella - knows he has a lot of explaining to do as his kids grow up.

Today, he may avoid glitzy star spots and premieres, preferring to stay home with his family, work or play golf, but his big break came when he played the well-endowed porn star Dirk Diggler in 1998 film Boogie Nights - a performance he says he won't be showing his kids until they are much older.

 

He's also keen his children learn early on to stay on the straight and narrow and avoid their dad's bad-boy experiences.

"My brother went to jail, I went to jail. Three of my brothers went to jail. My sister went to jail about 50 times. She's the worst one," the actor said.

Mark's new film The Departed is set in his home town of Boston, where the actor grew up as the youngest of nine - six boys and three girls. He and his brothers Robert and Donnie are the result of his mother's third marriage.

The film deals with the temptations of criminal life - a temptation the young Mark found hard to resist in real life.

At 14, he dropped out of school and embarked on a life of crime - including assault, stealing and selling drugs. Two years later, he was jailed for nearly two months for his role in beating up a man.

He credits that low point as making him resolve to turn his life around.

He said: "I didn't want to spend the rest of my life locked up. I might have been acting like an animal but I didn't want to be a caged one. I started lifting weights in jail and went from 130lbs of scrawniness to 170lbs of muscle that year."

Mark worked as a bri cklayer after he got out of jail but people began to notice the impressive physique on his 5ft 8in frame.

Donnie offered his little brother a place in his band, New Kids on The Block, and while he did join for a time he went on to forge a brief music career in his own right as Marky Mark.

In his teens, he became notorious for dropping his trousers during his concerts - but it was in the racy ads where he appeared with Kate Moss in his Calvin Klein undies that Mark made his mark.

Gay billionaire David Geffen had taken a shine to him and talked his friend Calvin Klein into signing Mark to an exclusive underwear modelling contract.

Mark was on billboards across the world, buff and bulging, and his most notorious picture was when he appeared in just a pair of Calvin Klein pants.

Even the teen singer was taken aback when a woman in her sixties told him she had that very picture of him on her wall.

Mark said: "I just laughed and apologised to her husband. He said, 'I don't care. It gives her something to do.'

"My mom still gives me a hard time about it."

Since then Mark has reinvented himself yet again, as an actor.

He no longer drops his trousers, and has enjoyed an acting career longer than he would have thought possible.

Mark is also determined Mike and Ella won't be embarrassed by their dad by avoiding lousy sequels and sleazy films.

He said: "I've had a really good run. I've always looked at my career like an athlete would look at his - you want to try to do your best work and then you want to go off and relax and age gracefully.

"I don't want to do it forever, but I want to be able to be in a position to not have to come back and do bad things just to put food on the table."

And yet, although Mark Wahlberg is now a soft-spoken, mature man with a settled family life, he sometimes misses the carefree days of his bad-boy era.

He admitted: "I miss being able to wake up when I want and go onstage when I want and pull down my pants when I want. Making movies is a highly regimented profession. Dawn, schedules, responsibility - I never believe any of the stories about actors who are irresponsible and work in movies. Just to get a film made requires a real discipline."

Mark returns to his Boston accent when he plays a cop in Martin Scorsese's The Departed, a remake of a Hong Kong gangster film with Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon and Jack Nicholson.

Although he shot the picture over a year ago, its release had been delayed.

"A lot of people have been waiting very patiently for this," agreed Mark.

"But it's Martin Scorsese, so don't get too worried about the delay."

Next he is set to shoot a follow-up to The Italian Job - The Brazilian Job, co-starring Charlize Theron.

But Mark hopes to eventually act with his older brother Donnie.

"It's just a matter of finding the right thing and making sure that I'm the star," he said with a cheeky grin.

Meanwhile, starting on ITV2 this month is Mark's executive-produced series Entourage, based on his own Hollywood adventures as a swinging single movie star, before he settled into a £3 million Beverly Hills mansion with his mother, long-time girlfriend Rhea Durham, and their two kids.

Entourage follows the rise of a cute young act or Vince Chase (Adrian Grenier) and the pals he brings with him to Hollywood, including best friend Eric (Kevin Connolly), less successful brother and actor Johnny Drama (Kevin Dillon) and a ligger called Turtle (Jerry Ferrara).

All of them are hoping to benefit from the hype and heat generated by their big star buddy.

Mark wants to make it clear the clueless older brother is nothing like real brother Donnie. But he admits he likes having a bunch of pals around him that he could trust and, during his popstar days, says his entourage was even bigger than Madonna's pack of cronies and helpers.

"The only person who had a bigger entourage than me," he said with a laugh, "was MC Hammer."

However, some of Mark's were not exactly reformed characters.

He said: "I have friends I've invited out to LA after serving a certain amount of time in prison or rehab or something like that and try to give them a job and show them another way, and maybe they're not capable of adapting to a different world, especially since it's Hollywood.

"So if they're stealing equipment off of a set that you might be working on, that's usually a downside to having an entourage."

Mark can be seen making a cameo appearance in the first episode but says his own entourage I days are far behind him today.

He admitted: "With what I do now the most important part of my I entourage is the nanny."

The Departed is out on October 6.


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What are blogs and do they matter?

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Gilbert & George at Tate Modern

  • Gilbert & George, the artistic duo best known for controversial works depicting sexual organs and swear words, have promised to displease at a retrospective of their work at Tate Modern.

    The artists, whose full names are Gilbert Proesch and George Passmore, will produce new works to accompany the exhibition of their art from the 1970s to the present. The exhibition, comprising more than 200 pieces, goes on display in February.

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    Gilbert Proesch (born in Italy September 11, 1943) and George Passmore (born in England January 8, 1942), better known as Gilbert & George, are artists. They have worked almost exclusively as a pair.

    Contents


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    15 September 2006
    GORE AND TRUE GUTS
     
    AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH F*** U

    FORGET Superman - only Al Gore can save the planet.

    Since losing the US election to George Bush in 2000, the former Vice-President has concentrated on educating the world about climate change. It's a message you can't afford to ignore.

    This film is basically an illustrated lecture by Gore on environmental catastrophes that will follow if human beings don't wake up to the rising temperature.

    Biographical bits and pieces about Gore break up the worrying statistics, so you can't help wishing he was in the White House instead of the current inhabitant.


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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TONY

    TEL CURRIE'S NEW BOOK

    Tel Currie - Warrior's Boxing Promoter & personal friend to the chaps - is close to finishing his sensational new book which includes personal contributions from Roy Shaw, Charlie Richardson, Ronnie Biggs, Charlie Bronson, Ronnie Knight, Wilf Pine, Dave Courtney, Paul Massey, Carlton Leach, 'Big' Albert Chapman, the top gypsy boys, Max Beesley, Kenny Noye, Paul Ferris... And tons more!

    WILF PINE
    THE ONLY ENGLISHMAN EVER TO BE ACCEPTED BY THE TOP ORGANISED CRIME BOSSES IN AMERICA

    A lot of things have been said about Tel Currie, ie. he's staunch, solid, more than capable in a row, he's always there for you, and if he's your friend, he's a friend for life, all these things are true. But for me, in these days of the so called "young turks", he has that rare quality, which we don't see much of, Respect. He gives it where he feels it's deserved, and doesn't mince his words when he feels none is warranted.

    I along with a lot of others admire him for it, me personally I like him, but more than that, I "Respect" him.

    Good Luck Tel

    Your Pal

    Wilf Pine


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    Thank you for the info TONY

     

    In "One of the Family", John Pearson tells the inside story of Wilf Pine, the first Englishman to be admitted to the Mafia. He introduced himself to Pearson at Ronnie Kray's funeral and persuaded him to write his story - a story even more extraordinary than that of the Krays.

    John Pearson's The Profession of Violence created the myth of the Kray twins, and remains a classic of True Crime, the best book ever written on East London villains and a book that started a mini publishing industry. Pearson knows the London crime scene very well, which is why he was surprised, while attending Ronnie Kray's funeral, to see a man to whom all the other villains deferred, but whom he didn't recognize. Investigation revealed that this man, the Englishman, never mentioned in any of the previous books on villainy because everyone was to scared to mention his name, was as legendary a figure on the streets of New York as on the streets of London. Pearson persuaded him to talk to him - and the result was a story even more extraordinary than that of the Krays. He became the adopted son of Joey Pagano, the head of one of the major New York crime families. Here the Englishman tells the story that no-one else dared to tell. 

    Of interest to fans of Carl Wayne and the Move, is the fact that Wilf Pine was a minder for the band during the height of their popularity and success in the Sixties. A fascinating read, the book is littered with references to the Move and Carl himself.

    The book is currently only available in hardback and can be obtained online from http://www.amazon.co.uk or ordered from your local book shop. A paperback edition of the book will be released in the Spring. Full review and excerpts coming soon!


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    Clifford Joseph Harris Jr. (born September 25, 1980 in Atlanta, Georgia), best known by the stage name T.I., is an American rapper, actor, and philanthropist.

    Contents


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    Cut! Mullan plans knife gang film.

    HIS most controversial cinematic outing outraged the Vatican with its portrayal of sadist nuns. Now Scottish writer-director Peter Mullan is to court controversy again with a film about violent teenage gangs in his home town of Glasgow.

    Mullan is currently working on a new screenplay about knife culture in the city where he grew up and still lives, despite offers from Hollywood.

     

    The currently untitled film will draw on his own experience of gang life in Glasgow and will be his first as writer-director since The Magdalene Sisters came out four years ago.

    But although Mullan's story is set in the 1970s, he knows that knife crime remains a serious issue in the city and the film will open him up to accusations of glamorising violence.

    Mullan says the film will simply draw on what he experienced. "All I can say is that it's set in 1974 in Glasgow," he said. "It's heavily informed by things that I saw."

    He hopes to finish the script this month and has already had preliminary discussions with the public film agency Scottish Screen, which also backed The Magdalene Sisters.

    Mullan stresses the film will not be a simple period drama and will have relevance to the current situation and the continuing attraction of knives. "It's trying to look at knife culture," said Mullan. "It's trying to look at the gangs."

    Mullan, who is noted for his outspoken, left-wing views and passionate support of socialist politician Tommy Sheridan, added: "I don't make any political references. It's in the mind of a 14-year-old and at that age they have little or no interest in politics."

    One obstacle will be raising enough finance to portray 1970s Glasgow realistically. "It's a crazy film to even attempt, because it's period and it's recent history and that costs money," Mullan said.

    "It will have Glaswegian accents, it will have all the things that makes getting money really difficult."

    As a teenager Mullan hung out with Young Car-D, a gang from the Cardonald area, near where he lived.

    They wore bowler hats and false eyelashes, like the characters in the Stanley Kubrick film A Clockwork Orange, and slashed their mark across the cheeks of other youths - with red biros. When one gang member used a knife instead of a pen, Mullan decided to get out. "I was away," he said. "That was the end of it."

    He said that if he had stayed with the gangs he could well have ended up in jail, but admitted he was really just a "tourist" from the comparatively affluent area of Mosspark.

    Instead, Mullan went to Glasgow University, studied economic history and drama and pursued a successful career as an actor, with appearances in Braveheart, Trainspotting and My Name Is Joe, for which he won the best actor award at the Cannes Film Festival in 1998.

    He also began writing and directing short films and then features. His first feature, Orphans, was a black comedy about a bereaved family, but it was his second, The Magdalene Sisters, that established him as one of Scotland's most successful contemporary film-makers.

    Other Scottish film-makers have attracted critical acclaim for similar themes, but have found it difficult to secure a significant audience. Ten years ago, Gillies MacKinnon made a film about Glasgow's teenage gangs in the 1960s, called Small Faces, but it was not a major commercial success.

    Mullan said his film would be "in that ball park", but that he was more influenced by the surrealism of If..., the 1968 film in which Malcolm McDowell leads a bloody revolution at his public school, machine-gunning teachers and prefects.

    Mullan is renowned for tackling controversial subjects. The Magdalene Sisters prompted furore in the Roman Catholic Church with its portrayal of brutal nuns and "immoral" young Irish women shut away in homes, used as slave labour and flogged when they stepped out of line.

    Set in the 1960s, it was condemned by the official Vatican radio station as "lies". Mullan fuelled the debate by comparing the nuns to the Taliban but the film was a commercial hit.

    Since the film's success, Mullan has had several approaches from the US and revealed that he had been in discussions to direct a big-budget love story, with a prospective fee of more than £2m. But he said he could not stand the hassle that went with dealing with big American companies.

    He said: "I don't work for the money. That's why I'm poor. I just want to make my own stuff, but I'm smart enough now to realise that you commit yourself for two years."

    Knife crime is still a major problem in Glasgow and appears to be getting worse. Strathclyde Police revealed last week that 3,300 knives and other weapons - nine per day - were seized by police in the past year, with most belonging to young people carrying them for "protection".

    A Safer Scotland campaign was launched earlier this year, which involved a nationwide blade amnesty and a high-profile stop-and-search operation over the summer. More than 12,000 knives and other weapons were surrendered.

    MEAN CITY'S BLOODY HISTORY

    GLASGOW gained a reputation as a tough city long before the knife, drugs and gun warfare that have dominated the past century.

    In the 1700s the Clyde provided a backdrop for weekly Saturday night stone fights between rival gangs. Men used to gather and attempt to win the small island that used to sit in the middle of the Clyde. It was only when someone was killed that the 'game' stopped.

    The first gang to get the attention of the media was the Penny Mob gangs of the 1870s. They used the subscription fee from their members to pay the fines of anyone jailed by the police - a penny a head, hence their name.

    By the early 1900s, organised gangs had infiltrated Glasgow's streets, with many areas broken down into rival turfs.

    In 2004, the Gorbals area of Glasgow was in mourning following the death of infamous 1930s razor gang leader Billy Fullerton. As leader of the Billy Boys, Fullerton symbolised a time in which some gangs were seen as champions of the people, providing their own version of the welfare state.

    Between the 1960s and late 1980s many of Glasgow's most iconic gangsters came into the frame.

    Convicted gun-runner Paul Ferris rose to prominence in Glasgow's underworld during the 1980s as an enforcer for the feared Thompson crime family. The last decade has seen Ferris's reinvention as a writer, chronicling his days as a gangster.

    One of the most bloody periods in Glasgow's history came in 1991 when the son of Arthur Thompson Snr - Glasgow's self-styled crime godfather - was gunned down outside his home. His assassination led to a turf war with more than half a dozen reprisal killings.

    By 2000, Thomas McGraw was hitting the headlines. Linked to numerous killings over the past three decades and having survived several attempts on his life, his house was hit with machine gun fire.

    Related topic

    19. Robert, Kirriemuir / 12:24pm 15 Oct 2006

    I have not previously heard of this writer but I too (and like hosts of others) am a product of the Glasgow working-classes of the 30s era and typically from a dysfunctional family background.

    There were indeed, many idle youths roaming the streets searching for excitement or some victim whom they (as gangs) could easily over power but there was a vast difference between fiction and reality.

    Most gang members lived in the 'Walter Mitty' fictional world where stories of bravadoism bolstered their deep-seated feelings of inadequacy spawned by parental rejection and emotional deprivation. They all suffered from the 'Cinderfella' syndrome while in reality, the public threat was terrifying but actual assaults few.

    Their world of make-believe was compensatory. In this fictional thought-world they created their own fate.

    The danger arises when their fictional-world becomes reality to them. While those crazy-for-recognition severely deprived types were never emotionally tough (a feature that scares them) they were (and are), dangerous in this state of mind where they react rather than respond to stimuli.

    In living out their dreams they become caught in the web of gang hysteria where they feel compelled to prove their worth as individuals and in the seemingly safety and cosiness of the group they seek to excel through carelessness and noteriety.

    They later become emotionally stunted living in their world of constant peurilism and regretfully, the power of today's television that plays-down to the lowest common denominator of intellectualism, panders to their beliefs. It sends the message to the malajusted telling them what they want to hear which is, it's okay to be like this!

    The writer will most likely be confessing to us his part in this perpetual "Cinderfella' story, probably hoping that it will bring about a catharsis in his life.

    A sad commentary indeed.

     

    *************************************************

    http://download.edinburgh.gov.uk/Libraries/ScottishWritingFestival.pdf.old 


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    http://www.amazon.co.uk
    Deadly Divisions: The Spectre Chronicles Paperback by Reg McKay Villains: It Takes One to Know One Paperback by Paul Ferris Scottish Hard Bastards Hardcover by Jimmy Holland
     




    You might also consider:
    The Ferris Conspiracy by Paul Ferris, Reg McKay Vendetta Turning Your Back on Crime Can Be... by Paul Ferris, Reg McKay Indictment: Trial by Fire by T.C. Campbell, Reg McKay


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    Reply with quote  #75 

    Check out the following sites:

    http://www.cybercrime.gov/reporting.htm


    http://www.usdoj.gov/criminal/cybercrime/intl.html



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