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Reply with quote  #1486 
The biggest gangsters are in the House of Lords, MP's, Chief Constables and many more places than on the streets.




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Paul doesn't use Facebook

This Is Paul's Official Twitter Page.

Paul Ferris

@PaulFerris_Gla

 

The sooner they get an independent body to investigate police complaints, the better.Just now, it's like asking Al Capone to investigate the Mafia.


paulviking.websitetoolbox.com/post?id=992613


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Hundreds of people lined the streets to pay tribute to Paul Massey
 
 "Grandad" and "Salford legend".

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C.E.N (CRIME EDUCATION NETWORK)
MAKING REINTEGRATION REAL
By Paul Ferris

From Prison to the University of Life 

If there is a real intent to want to reduce reoffending, some people will have to moderate their approach for imprisonment. Although there is nothing glamorous about prison life, it is a place where time is wasted and we want the kids not to idolise people who have been in jail. The real character of ex-prisoners are shown when they come out of prison and are able to lead a crime free life, look after their families and when they are able to make use of the educational facilities whilst in prison so they are able to find suitable employment or helping the youths of today to change their path in life. 

Some people also imagine that release from prison is a happy experience and it is in theory. The reality is the incarcerated individual most often loses every friend and relative they had in as little as 3 years of imprisonment. The person once released from prison is entering a world that can seem unwelcoming, unforgiving and unsupporting that hinders the rehabilitation process or in most cases some feel they have landed on another planet once their time is served as part of the punishment handed down to them by the judiciary. Prison and its intended purpose are to cement negative identities. 

Everything I have done has consequences and I value those consequences because they are a mirror image of my past, present and future of my progress towards reengaging with social contracts to become a citizen and not a prison number. 

I am responsible and I am free. I seek help to overcome addictions. I seek help for my health. I seek help when I need it and I deal with events in my life when they occur because I know that success comes to those who take charge especially if you know deep down that ignoring the problems doesn’t make those problems go away. I don’t accept excuses from myself and I don’t offer them to others. You shouldn’t either. I just want to help others who have travelled on the same path in life to change course for the better, to live crime free and most important of all is never forget who you are or where you are now in this university of life.

The realities that are cornerstones to rehabilitation are that people who have criminal convictions are not permanently criminal and that it is possible to reengage back into society. The main aim of rehabilitation is to stop reoffending “The Revolving Doors Syndrome” Rehabilitation would seek, by means of education through mentors who have travelled the same path. Everyone within Government, every section of civil society, every community leader, needs to play their part in making reintegration real.

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I am now standing down as CEO of MIDAS Scotland. I wish all parties the very best of luck in a very challenging environment.

C.E.N (CRIME EDUCATION NETWORK)

MAKING REINTEGRATION REAL

By Paul Ferris

From Prison to the University of Life 

If there is a real intent to want to reduce reoffending, some people will have to moderate their approach for imprisonment. Although there is nothing glamorous about prison life, it is a place where time is wasted and we want the kids not to idolise people who have been in jail. The real character of ex-prisoners are shown when they come out of prison and are able to lead a crime free life, look after their families and when they are able to make use of the educational facilities whilst in prison so they are able to find suitable employment or helping the youths of today to change their path in life. 

Some people also imagine that release from prison is a happy experience and it is in theory. The reality is the incarcerated individual most often loses every friend and relative they had in as little as 3 years of imprisonment. The person once released from prison is entering a world that can seem unwelcoming, unforgiving and unsupporting that hinders the rehabilitation process or in most cases some feel they have landed on another planet once their time is served as part of the punishment handed down to them by the judiciary. Prison and its intended purpose are to cement negative identities. 

Everything I have done has consequences and I value those consequences because they are a mirror image of my past, present and future of my progress towards reengaging with social contracts to become a citizen and not a prison number. 

I am responsible and I am free. I seek help to overcome addictions. I seek help for my health. I seek help when I need it and I deal with events in my life when they occur because I know that success comes to those who take charge especially if you know deep down that ignoring the problems doesn’t make those problems go away. I don’t accept excuses from myself and I don’t offer them to others. You shouldn’t either. I just want to help others who have travelled on the same path in life to change course for the better, to live crime free and most important of all is never forget who you are or where you are now in this university of life.

The realities that are cornerstones to rehabilitation are that people who have criminal convictions are not permanently criminal and that it is possible to reengage back into society. The main aim of rehabilitation is to stop reoffending “The Revolving Doors Syndrome” Rehabilitation would seek, by means of education through mentors who have travelled the same path. Everyone within Government, every section of civil society, every community leader, needs to play their part in making reintegration real.


http://www.midasltd.com/midas-scotland/


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Reply with quote  #1491 
 vendetta.jpg 


Exposes the dark forces that police us as well as revealing the truth about the conspiracies and corruption.




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Journalists usually refer to what they write as stories. Not articles or reports, occasionally pieces, but stories. This does not apply only to reporters but to everybody in the editorial chain, from desk editors, copy editors, specialist and sports writers to the editor him or herself. Words published in newspapers, on air or online are stories. 

Stories sound interesting; reports sound dull. To some, stories mean fiction: "Tell me a story, mummy". Stories are tall and short, made up and true. True stories are about what happened. We tell stories in conversation, recounting experiences and events in which we took part or observed. The crucial thing about a story is that other people want to hear it, because it is interesting or entertaining. Otherwise the storyteller is a bore. 

So journalists write stories for their readers to tell them what is going on, to inform them, engage them, entertain them, shock them, amuse them, disturb them, uplift them. The subject matter will vary according to the nature of the publication and the intended audience. The good newspaper editor will have a clear idea of the sort of people who are reading it, and cater to their interests and preoccupations, sometimes their prejudices. And the paper will include that vital ingredient serendipity - the story you didn't expect, the "just fancy that", the absurdities as well as the travails of the human condition. 

 

Journalism is basically a simple game. It is about finding things out and telling other people about them. The finding out requires a variety of skills because those in power often prefer that we know only so much. Journalism is about holding such people to account, exposing their humbug and hypocrisy, the abuse of their power. This includes the control it gives them over the flow of information, the ability to bury the bad news, to spin and obfuscate. Good journalists must ask the awkward questions and question the answers, must dig to unearth and then explain, making comprehensible that which authority, by intent or verbal inadequacy, has left confused, incomplete or plain mendacious. Incomprehensible journalism is quite simply bad journalism, and therefore pointless.









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Glasgow's gangsters, Arthur Thompson - The Godfather
By Ron McKay 

The transition from old to new was swift and brutal.

Three shots at close range from a .22 pistol hit young Arthur Thompson, the first bullet grazing his cheek, the second smashing into his ribs, puncturing a lung, the third, deliberately fired into his anus, tearing through his gut and piercing his heart.
It was a late summer evening, the 31-year-old gangster was only six hours out of Noranside prison on a weekend parole, he had just eaten a curry, he was steps away from safety when the three-man hunting party struck outside the family home.

His father, Old Arthur, the head of the most notorious Glasgow crime family, found him on the pavement outside the Ponderosa, as it was called, after the ranch in the popular 1970s cowboy series Bonanza. 

[GL640958]
Arthur Thompson Senior as a young man (Photo: Media Scotland)

It was hardly that, just two former council houses in Provanmill Road, bought, lashed together and titivated with bijou add-ons. Junior had tried to crawl to it even as his life seeped away. His limp, heavy body was rushed to the Royal Infirmary. In vain. The heir was dead. And the empire was crumbling.

For more than 30 years Arthur Thompson Snr had been the undisputed major crime figure in Glasgow, the Godfather, numero uno, although his name then wasn't widely known. He preferred discretion, doing his business in the shadows, not for him spraying his money about and hanging out in the city clubs, cultivating reporters and TV stars like the young rogues who would displace him.

Thompson was born in Springburn in 1931 to a modest and law-abiding family. It was the year Ramsey MacDonald won a landslide election victory heading a party of national government, Hitler was seizing power in Germany, it was the year Abbey Road studios opened and Celtic goalkeeper John Thompson died after an on-field clash at Ibrox against Rangers. 

[GL218344]
Paul Ferris leaves Glasgow High Court (Photo: Media Scotland)

Growing up through the Second World War young Arthur was handy with his fists, better with a blade, and he earned himself a ferocious reputation. Although he wasn't very tall, pushing 5'9”, he was broad and mean, with a flattened nose and a chilling, thousand-yard stare.

Arthur's start in crime was as a strong arm for money lenders, the business he moved into on his own as he left his teens. He had a failsafe method of collection. Those who didn't pay up promptly were usually crucified, nailed to the floor or to a door.
He also became a friend and enforcer for the Krays. There's a story, or legend, that he made himself known to them by bursting into a club they drank in, the Double R, brandishing a gun and shouting, “I'm Arthur Thompson, from Glasgow. Remember my name”.

For a time he was involved in heists and bank robbery, with a crew which included safecracker Paddy Meehan, later to be wrongly jailed (and subsequently pardoned) for murder. He served an 18-month sentence for extortion, but decided that prison wasn't for him and he would put his money mainly into legitimate businesses, dancehalls and pubs, always through nominees.

But violence was never far away.

In the 1960s he was at war with another crime family, the Welshes, from Blackhill. In 1966 he dodged death when a bomb under the passenger seat of his car killed his mother-in-law. Shortly after, out driving, he spotted the two men he believed were responsible, Patrick Welsh and his associate James Goldie, and ran their van off the road and into a lamppost. Both men died, Arthur was charged with their murder but, unsurprisingly, the police were unable to persuade witnesses to testify. Just to keep it in the family, three years later Arthur's wife Rita barged her way into Welsh home and stabbed Patrick Welsh's wife in the chest. She served three years.

The Welsh name, like that of Thompson, runs like a poisoned river through Glasgow crime. Paul Ferris, who was to be charged with young Arthur's murder, was bullied by the Welshes when he was developing his crime moves in Blackhill. He retaliated brutally, a slashing and a scalping were involved, which was what brought him to the attention of Arthur, who hired him, treated him like another son, and put him to work as an enforcer and debt collector.

A fateful mistake.

The sobriquet 'Godfather' is now ritually slapped on to any crime figure who hits the headlines, but there are similarities between the Thompsons and the Corleone family in the films and Mario Puzo novel. Sonny Corleone is ambushed and shot down. Like Arty. There is a weak younger son in both families, Fredo a fictional parallel to Billy Thompson, ridiculed and too weak to take over as clan leader, heroin-addicted, assaulted and stabbed several times, although, unlike Fredo, he survives. 

By the 1980s the big money in crime was in drugs, heroin particularly, which flooded the city. The market then was reckoned to be worth £300 million. It was bonanza for the Ponderosa. No matter that with it came hundreds of overdose deaths, including Thompson's daughter Margaret. Billy, too, took to the needle, both supplied by Arty, now head of the clan, swimming in cash and, unlike his father, highly visible and conspicuously wealthy. But also a target for those who wanted to take him down and take over.

The foundations of a coup were laid in 1985 when Fat Boy was sentenced to 11 years for supplying heroin. He believed he had been set up, and he probably was.
 
[GD1356035]
The wreckage after the car bomb which killed Arthur Thompson's mother in law, Maggie Johnston(Photo: Media Scotland)

A police stakeout saw him delivering to a street supplier in Easterhouse, John 'Blind Jonah' McKenzie (then with one eye, the second would be knifed out later!). Thompson spotted the set-up and drove off at high speed with the police giving chase, chucking packets of heroin from the the window as he dodged in and out of traffic.

But with the son banged-up and Old Arthur's malign influence waning, his bevvying spiralling, other gangs and godfathers now began to unpick the Thompson empire. The old Godfather had reach, however, and might still pose problems. So he had to be removed.

Two attempts were made to take him out. In 1985 he was shot in the groin outside the Ponderosa. He managed to drive himself to the private Ross Hall hospital on the outskirts of the city, where he claimed, in legendary hard man style, that a drill bit had snapped and pierced his groin, a story he retold to the police who inevitably turned up to interview him.

[GL640326]
The Ponderosa in Provanmill Road (Photo: Media Scotland)

Then three years later, returning alone from his local pub, the Provanmill Inn, he was run over by a car driven by two men, and rammed up against a fence, again outside the Ponderosa. They also fired several shots at him, missing, but throwing down the pistol, hoping to incriminate him. Thompson suffered a broken leg. He would later say in the witness box, as he would about the murder of his son, that baby-faced Paul Ferris was responsible.

That testimony, breaking the risible gangster code of omerta, marked the end. The 30-year reign of Glasgow's Godfather was over.

In 1993 he would die aged 61, in the most unlikely circumstances, of natural causes, in his bed in the Ponderosa. A daughter had passed before him, his youngest boy was a pathetic junkie, his eldest, named after him, had been gunned down and the man he believed had shot him, Ferris, had walked free after the longest and most costly trial in Scottish legal history.

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Reply with quote  #1494 

How Fat Boy and the Apprentice unleashed Glasgow's gang wars

url.jpg


Tony Thompson reports


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THE FEE MAN 

10_198_144_37.jpg


EXCLUSIVE

Ex-gangland enforcer Paul Ferris clobbered for thousands by taxman after four-year probe into his earnings

Ferris settled a six-figure bill after investigators trawled through his commercial affairs dating back over a decade


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NotProven.jpg 



You will note from the published article that your newspaper made a false and malicious claim on what verdict the jury returned against me in the 1992 trial.

Your newspaper has repeatedly been warned that the verdict returned by the jury was a unanimous NOT GUILTY.
The repeated reference by your newspaper in this regard shows a malicious intent to draw an inference of guilt by falsely claiming that the jury returned a NOT PROVEN verdict against me.

You should seek previous legal advice on how to settle this issue. 

I am now seeking a further apology for the malicious intent due to previous issues with the same false verdict that your newspaper - including the Daily Record - have printed for public consumption.

I am also seeking a correction from your newspaper so that your readership will no longer be deceived by reading false and malicious claims made against me by your newspaper.

I also want ALL reference to the malicious and false verdict removed from the internet archives too.

Failure to comply will involve the PPC and if needed a judicial remedy.

I await your response.

Kind regards,

Paul J Ferris.


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Reply with quote  #1497 
Telling tales on Thompson trial supergrass
THE career of Dennis David Woodman, a major Crown witness in the Arthur Thompson Jr murder trial at the High Court in Glasgow, is exposed tonight in harsh detail in Granada TV's World In Action. It casts doubts yet again on his use by the Scottish authorities.

Woodman, known in England as Wilkinson or by other aliases, gave five

days of colourful evidence, claiming Mr Paul Ferris, the accused, had

confessed to him while they were in the segregation unit at Barlinnie

Prison.

However, his testimony was wrecked by incisive cross-examinationfrom Mr Donald Findlay, QC.

Despite a considerable body of better quality evidence in what was

Scotland's longest murder trial, the jury acquitted Mr Ferris on all

charges.

The use of Woodman, one Crown source later said, meant ''the baby was

thrown out with the bath water''.

Mr Steve Bolton, the programme's producer, said yesterday: ''When we first started hearing of Wilkinson/Woodman's use as a witness in theFerris case, we were astonished because we already knew a lot about his

background. It was very clear he had reached the end of his shelf life

in the English courts after seven or eight cases.

''In the case of Kevin Wong at Chester Crown Court, the Judge said he

would be unhappy if the jury convicted on the evidence of Woodman alone.

Peter Brockelsby was cleared at Leeds Crown Court after other prisoners

described Woodman reading court papers beforehand to brief himself.

''His career of lying, aside from the damage he did to individuals, is

a black comedy.''

The programme examines why Woodman, now in the protection wing at

Peterhead Prison, serving a lengthy sentence for the kidnapping of a

Dumfries farmer, began his career as a police informer. It followed an

earlier kidnapping accompanied by sadistic treatment of the victim.

Woodman feared a life sentence. However, a witness says on screen, if

he could show the Judge he had helped the prosecution in other cases, he

He was held in Risley Remand Centre and, says World In Action, a

string of men who had previously protested their innocence suddenly

queued up to confess to Woodman. The police and a number of English

Judges and juries then accepted his evidence.

World In Action have, however, unearthed another former Risley inmate

who speaks of Woodman attempting to get him to go to the police and say

he had overheard other criminals admitting crimes.

After Woodman assisted the police, a detective inspector spoke for him

in court. For charges of theft, fraud, false imprisonment, indecent

assault, and wounding with intent he received only six years.

The programme then describes how Woodman offered appeal lawyers deals

to retract his evidence for the Crown if he was paid to do so. Also

revealed is the help given to Woodman by the police after he left jail.

After his record as a supergrass was exposed in English newspapers,

Woodman said he hoped for police protection and for rehousing. It was

five years later that he re-emerged in Scotland.

Glasgow solicitor Peter Forbes says on screen that ''it just seemed

inconceivable that anyone would shout details of such a major crime to

any other party in the segregation unit and for Paul Ferris to have done

it was totally and utterly inconceivable.''

World In Action journalist Andrew Bell said yesterday: ''Only a few

secrecy yet whenever we asked anyone in an official position in Scotland

to talk about the Ferris case they dived for cover.

''I asked the Crown Office, the procurator-fiscal's office in Glasgow,

and Strathclyde Police but none would speak. Strathclyde Police told us

that the case was still sub judice but both the Crown Office and the

procurator-fiscal's office told us this was nonsense.

''We approached two prison governors to interview prisoners under the

more relaxed guidelines which are now in force and both seemed more than

happy to let us in. They were jumped on by the Scottish Office. They

would give us no reason or tell us who had made the decision.''

Dennisthemenace.jpg 

http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/12642673.Telling_tales_on_Thompson_trial_supergrass/



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In our life, at some time, our inner fire goes out only to burst into flames by an encounter with likeminded people who inspire us. We should all be thankful for those people who rekindle the inner spirit and help us focus towards all of our aims, goals and objectives in life.


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Glasgow's gangsters: Paul Ferris, from Blackhill to the Old Bailey
He is wearing a dark, collarless jerkin over a sparkling white shirt and an extravagantly-patterned tie.His arms are spread in the air in triumph, a wide smile splitting his handsome, boyish face, marred only by an old scar running from the right side of his mouth to chin. The neatly-parted hair is immaculately barbered.
He could be an office worker or young bank clerk celebrating an unexpected bonus or a lottery win, and in a sense he is, although it is much more important to him than that.
 
[GL218344]
Paul Ferris leaves Glasgow High Court (Image: Media Scotland)

The background, however, provides a context, the grim-faced police officers and the huge sandstone columns flanking him, in the foreground the jostling crowd of reporters, cameras and punters are thronging the steps below him. Paul Ferris has just been acquitted of murdering young Arthur Thompson, aka 'Fat Boy', in the longest and most costly trial in Scottish legal history.

It's July 1992, almost a year after Thompson died from three gunshot wounds outside the family home, known as the Ponderosa, in Provanmill Road. Ferris has also been found not guilty of a raft of associated charges, including drug trafficking, conspiracy and possession of firearms.

Spool back to September 1991, a month after the murder, Ferris is in jail accused of it, Thompson's body has been released to his family and it is the day of his funeral. Early that morning the charge hand at the Cottage Bar in Shettleston notices a dark blue metallic Orion car parked in adjacent Darleith Street.

He looks inside to see a body in the front seat and one in the back, both clearly dead. These are Bobby Glover and Joe 'Bananas' Hanlon, both of whom would have stood trial alongside Ferris as alleged accomplices, had they lived. Actually there probably wouldn't have been a trial without Ferris's incarceration, which surely saved his life.
 
[GD5788743]
Arthur Thompson attends the funeral of his son Arthur junior (Image: Media Scotland)

The symbolism of this could not have been more obvious. Both had been shot in the head, with one bullet up the backside, as had been done to Thompson. The Cottage Bar was Hanlon and Glover's gang hut, Ferris was often there, and Fat Boy's funeral cortege was due to pass nearby that day.

Ferris claims that he learned of the brutal end of his two pals when a gleeful prison officer told him early that morning of the funeral, September 19. Whether true or not, he must have felt like kissing the four stout walls protecting him.
 
[GL92060]
Bobby Glover (Image: Media Scotland)

There's little doubt that Fat Boy's father ordered the killings, or that someone else did it as a favour to him, but no one has been convicted of the double murder and the suspicion is that the police are hardly in a hurry to resolve it, bad guys killing other bad guys.

Some time after Ferris walked free he came up with his version of the Fat Boy murder, which doesn't so much strain credulity as hospitalise it. He blames someone called the Apprentice, together with two hit men from London.
 
[GD5825125]
Joe Hanlon (Image: Media Scotland)

His is a dizzying story of conspiracies, of an MI5 and National Crime Squad frame-up, several Glasgow underworld figures are claimed to be police 'grasses', and of this mysterious, or mythical, figure who emerges to press the trigger. Really? His account contains information like the position of Thompson as each bullet struck, what the killer was thinking as he fired the shots - the hitman even turns out to be a pal of Hanlon and Glover, and, guess what, about the same age and height as Ferris and from the same part of Glasgow ...

If that wasn't enough there's the Apprentice's mistaken shooting of a man in Glasgow in 1991. Can this be John Hogg, whose hip was shattered in a gun attack aimed at another man? In that same year the anonymous hitman also kneecaps petty crook William Gillen. Paul Ferris was charged with both of these shootings, but cleared by a jury.
 
[GD1356031]
Paul Ferris (Image: Media Scotland)

Perhaps the dropping of the double jeopardy rule, which now means someone can now be tried twice for the same murder, has made Ferris uncharacteristically reticent?

Ferris's route to the High Court began in Blackhill, breeding ground of so many Glasgow neds, his early teenage crimes involving weapons and violence and young offenders' prisons. His older brother Billy was convicted of murder in 1977 and again in 2003 for stabbing a 15-year-old to death. Paul was the youngest of four - two boys two girls - born to a Catholic mother and a Protestant father, brought up as a 'Billy' with a hatred of Celtic. That, along with his fearlessness and readiness for violence, must have been what endeared him to Old Arthur Thompson. They also had a common enemy in the Welsh family from Blackhill. It was even said that Arthur had a picture of the enforcer he recruited at 19 on his mantlepiece, until it all went wrong.
 
[GL640326]
The Ponderosa in Provanmill Road (Image: Media Scotland)

That appears to have happened when Ferris was arrested in an armed police raid at the Thompson holiday home in Rothesay the day after he arrived to hide out. He was on the run after a stabbing and while he was awaiting trial for possession of offensive weapons. Further charges followed the Bute raid, a rag-bag of alleged offences including attempted murder and possession of heroin with intent to supply. The most serious charge was later dropped and Ferris was found not guilty of the drugs charge, but he went down on an 18-month sentence on the earlier weapons one.

His hatred of the Thompsons was bitter, as it was of Tam McGraw, another criminal who profited from the collapse of the Ponderosa empire.
 
[GD8547578]
Paul Ferris (Image: Danny Lawson/PA)

McGraw, a major Glasgow drug dealer, was universally known as The Licensee, either because he owned a Barlanark pub, the Caravel, through his wife, or because, in Ferris's version, he had a licence to commit crime provided by Strathclyde police because he was a top-level informant. A grass.

Ferris maintains that McGraw was involved in the aftermath of the Fat Boy killing, displaying the dead bodies of Hanlon and Glover to Old Arthur in the Caravel. Whether true or not, it is the case that after an underworld tip to police that they would find evidence concerning the killings in the pub, the Caravel was pulled down overnight and without planning permission.
 
[JS13235280]
Paul Ferris in 2013 (Image: Danny Lawson/PA Wire)


The feud between Ferris and McGraw didn't stop at words. In May 2002 a peace meeting between them ended in a knife fight and the Licensee was punctured several times, despite wearing a bulletproof vest. Ferris had been convicted of gun-running at the Old Bailey in London in 1998, caught with three Mac-10 sub-machine guns and ammunition, and, ironically, was out on licence. It was revoked and he returned to Frankland prison.

Paul Ferris now claims to be on the straight and narrow. He has been involved with security companies, a heavily fictionalised film version of his life, The Wee Man, did not bust the box office, he has authored books (in association with the late Reg McKay) and if you look up his Wikipedia entry it classes him as 'writer'.


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