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tamurman

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I WOULD LOVE TO SIT DOWN ONE NIGHT AND WRIGHT ABOUT THE JAIL FROM 1965 TO 1994 BUT I THINK I WOULD BORE YOU OR YOU WOULD LOVE IT THE STROKES WE PULLED?????????????????/ THE GOOD THE BAD THE SAD??????????

Magpie

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Originally Posted by tamurman

I WOULD LOVE TO SIT DOWN ONE NIGHT AND WRIGHT ABOUT THE JAIL FROM 1965 TO 1994 BUT I THINK I WOULD BORE YOU OR YOU WOULD LOVE IT THE STROKES WE PULLED?????????????????/ THE GOOD THE BAD THE SAD??????????

 

Now thats a great post you have started Tamurman. I am very intrigued to read your own experiences of 'jail life' and i'm sure others will add their own experiences along the way. So how about starting with the 'Good'.

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Barlinnie Prison in Glasgow
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Barlinnie Prison in Glasgow

HM Prison Barlinnie is a prison located in the residential suburb of Riddrie, in the north-east of Glasgow, Scotland. It was mainly used for short term prisoners or those awaiting trial in Glasgow courts, but also long term prisoners awaiting transfer to prisons such as Saughton or Peterhead it also housed the Libyan diplomat who is held responsible for the Lockerbie plane disaster but who has now been transferred to Gateside Prison, Greenock. Barlinnie prison consists of 5 halls - A, B, C, D, and E. The infamous Scottish murderer Peter Manuel was hanged here in 1958. The prison is colloquially known as "Bar-L" in some parts of Scotland. The bucket-as-toilet routine known as slopping out was still in practice there as late as 2003. Since 2001 refurbishment has taken place after critical reports by the Scottish Chief Inspector of Prisons [1].

Headline-hitting footballer Duncan Ferguson was locked up in Barlinnie Prison for 44 days in 1995.


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25 July 2006
CELL BLOCK H
 

EVERY single prisoner in a cell block at a Scottish jail was on heroin, a court heard yesterday.

And drugs were so rife in Noranside prison that consignments of the deadly cargo arrived by delivery van. Dealer Charles Anderson told the High Court in Perth that he simply walked out to the car park of the open prison, near Forfar, Angus, to collect a bag of heroin.

Anderson, 48, from Dundee, said he would be informed the package had arrived and was able to go out to meet the driver.

He then walked back into the jail building carrying a package of drugs with a prison value of around £2300.

Lord Mackay of Drumadoon asked: "Does the Crown accept it would be perfectly possible for someone to drive a van into the car park, then for someone to take delivery of a package?"

Brian McConnachie QC, prosecuting, said he accepted that was the case because of the relaxed regime at the jail.

The court was first told the drugs had arrived in an ice cream van.

But yesterd ay, Mr McConnachie said: "The belief is that drugs were transported by a visitor's vehicle which was a van."

Anderson was midway through a seven-year jail term for drug dealing when he was moved to Noranside.

He was caught with the drugs at the prison on July 7 last year.

The court heard he appeared to be unwell and shaking - and produced a balloon from his trousers which was stuffed with heroin.

Anderson was jailed for a further three years and three months yesterday after admitting the drug charge.

Lord Mackay said: "The offence is obviously a serious matter, particularly as it was committed by you when you were serving a significant sentence for drug dealing."


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Inveraray, the seat of the Duke of Argyll, was for many centuries the principal county town of Argyll. From the mid 18th century the courts met in the Town House on Front Street, and the ground floor below the courtroom served as the county prison. There the prisoners:

"walked in a grated piazza in front of their Cells, just in line of the principal street, and exposing the miserable appearance of their apartments and furniture to shock the feelings of every passer bye"

There were so many escapes from this building that at times the townspeople had to take turns in guarding it. Judges threatened to move the courts from Inveraray unless new premises were found and the old prison abandoned

Inverary Jail from the West
A site for the new Courthouse and Prison was found and plans were drawn up in 1807 by the well known Edinburgh architect Robert Reid. These plans, which included separate prison blocks for men, women and debtors, had to be shelved owing to lack of funds.

The original jail at Inveraray

Reid’s proposals were, however, later adapted by the architect James Gillespie Graham. He simplified the design of the courthouse and reduced the prison accommodation to one eight cell block. Work started on the new buildings in 1816 and was completed in 1820.

The Jail and Courthouse opened in 1820 and remained unchanged until 1843 when the Airing Yards were built. These were to provide a secure place where prisoners could be exercised in the open air.

In 1848 the New Prison, or Men's Prison, was completed. This was a model prison for its day with 12 individual cells, a water closet on every floor, accommodation for warders, a store room and indoor exercise gallery. It was also well heated and lit by gas, a far cry from the dark and damp original prison building.

The Jail finally closed on the 30th of August 1889. By this time, in comparison to the larger city prisons, the smaller county jails tended to be expensive and inefficient to run.

As a town Inveraray gradually declined in importance. It was difficult to reach and with the disappearance of the herring, it was no longer a significant fishing port. The Circuit Court met only twice in Inveraray after 1900, and moved to Oban in 1953. Despite local protests, the Sheriff Court was removed to Dunoon in 1954.

Courthouse from Church Square

The rarely used courthouse and empty prisons gradually fell into disrepair. Fortunately their significance as the finest 19th century county courthouse and prison in Scotland was recognised. An extensive restoration was undertaken by the Scottish Office and in May 1989, almost a hundred years exactly after the last prisoners departed, Inveraray Jail opened to the public.


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LONDON (Reuters) - As many as 1,000 prison staff in England and Wales are corrupt, using their positions to smuggle mobile phones and drugs to inmates, according to report.

The study, which was obtained and reported by the BBC, by the prison service's own anti-corruption unit and London's Metropolitan Police said another 500 staff had inappropriate relationships with prisoners.

The prison service, which employs over 45,000 staff in England and Wales, said the problem was not widespread.

"We don't tolerate any form of corruption, we are determined to root it out," a home office official told Reuters. "We are confident the vast majority of prison staff are honest."

She said the joint study was the result of "extrapolation from anecdotal evidence and investigations."

Several unnamed prison governors are quoted in the report, one of whom said there were far too many mobile phones in jail for them all to have been brought in without the aid of staff.

An academic commissioned by the prison service to look at corruption six years ago said the problem was widespread.

Tim Newburn, a professor at the London School of Economics, told the BBC it was a "significant problem for control, for order for discipline and crucially I think for ethical conduct within the Prison Service".


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Number of female inmates doubles
Cornton Vale
Inmate numbers at Cornton Vale have risen significantly
The number of female prisoners in Scotland has doubled in the past 10 years, a prison inspection has found.

Chief inspector Dr Andrew McLellan said this made it hard to meet inmates' needs at Cornton Vale, Stirling.

He also said questions surrounded the practice of routinely "double-cuffing" and pointed to two cases where pregnant inmates were handcuffed during labour.

However, Dr McLellan praised improved living conditions and the arrangements for maintaining family contact.

The findings in his report were based on an inspection of Cornton Vale prison and young offenders institution in February.

During the inspection the number of prisoners was 326, half of whom were convicted of violent offences.

Their time of imprisonment is unlikely to heal the desperate things that are wrong with them
Dr Andrew McLellan
HM Chief Inspector of Prisons

Dr McLellan said in 1998 prison and social work chiefs had called for a joint strategy to reduce the daily female population at Cornton Vale from more than 170 to 100 or less by the end of 2000.

"Today that sounds fanciful," he said.

His report found that boredom was a major problem and the time inmates spent in cells was increasing.

He also noted that there had been a reduction in psychology services.

"Many of these women arrive at the prison gate in a desperate state, suffering from a combination of mental and physical ill health," he said.

"For most prisoners in Cornton Vale their time of imprisonment is unlikely to heal the desperate things that are wrong with them in body, mind and spirit when they are admitted."

Humanity issues

The report said the greatest concern raised by prisoners and staff was double-cuffing.

Prisoners leaving Cornton Vale for any reason, except for a work placement, have their wrists handcuffed together and then handcuffed to a custody officer.

Prison staff told inspectors of cases where no mother was present at a children's hearing because prisoners could not bring themselves to be double-cuffed in front of their children.

Dr Andrew McLellan
Dr Andrew McLellan raised questions over "double-cuffing"

Staff also told of women refusing to go to hospital for medical treatment when they learned that they would be double-cuffed and women being handcuffed during labour.

Dr McLellan said: "There is always a balance to be found between security and humanity, but in the case of women giving birth the security considerations would need to be extraordinarily high to justify this practice."

The report pointed to some good work with addictions and mental health and said there had been a significant reduction in the number of women harming themselves.

It also praised the living conditions in the new residential accommodation and better living arrangements for offenders under the age of 21.


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The Howard League for Penal Reform today called on the Government to institute a programme of closures of women's prisons, and a transfer of resources to community programmes and treatment facilities that tackle women's needs and reduce re-offending.

 

http://www.howardleague.org/


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Hi All... thanks for all your posts with regards to 'Peterhead, Bar & Others'.

 

Following the latest 'scandal' of how drugs and other banned items were finding their way into prisons, and subsequently, the hands of prisoners, perhaps we shall see justice being done, and the bent screws in Pentonville getting their just deserts and seeing life from the other side of the bars... 

 

Well, we can live in hope can't we?

 

 

Prison staff in 'corruption' quiz
HMP Pentonville
Pentonville Prison was built in 1842
Fourteen prison officers have been suspended in north London following allegations of corrupt behaviour.

The governor of HMP Pentonville took action following claims of trafficking and "inappropriate relations", a Prison Service spokeswoman said.

The jail is to "briefly reduce" its maximum number of inmates as a result with some prisoners being moved to other London prisons, she added.

Prison Service director Phil Wheatley said corruption would not be tolerated.

He said "appropriate disciplinary action" would be taken if necessary.

Leaked study

The allegations are to be investigated by senior governors from other London prisons.

The prison spokeswoman said: "If any alleged or otherwise suspected criminal activity is uncovered during the investigations relevant information will be passed to the police."

There are currently 379 staff at Pentonville, with 139 on duty at any one time.

Last month a leaked study by the Metropolitan Police and the Prison Service suggested at least 1,000 prison staff nationwide were corrupt - although it found most staff were honest.

It also suggested more than 500 were involved in "inappropriate relationships" with prisoners.

'Action taken'

Chairman of the Prison Officers' Association, Colin Moses, said more stringent vetting of prison officers was needed and said problems were created by a policy of local recruitment.

But he added that the suspended officers should be judged against the criminal test - beyond reasonable doubt - rather than on balance of probabilities.

 

"Of course, if any wrongdoings are found we would expect that action be taken against these people," he said.

 

Pentonville, which can hold up to 1,177 prisoners, dates back to 1842.

 

 




 


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Magpie

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Daily Mirror  17 August 2006

       
EXCLUSIVE: WARDER UNIFORM FOUND IN 'SCANDAL JAIL' CELL
       
BREAKOUT FEARED
By Greig Box

A PRISON officer's uniform was found hidden in a cell at the jail being probed for alleged corruption.

It is feared the outfit, discovered in a crackdown on bent staff, could have been worn by a prisoner as part of an audacious jailbreak.

A Prison Service source said: "It's a massive security concern. Inquiries are continuing into how it ended up in an inmate's possession."

The revelation comes after 14 officers were suspended at Pentonville jail in North London accused of "inappropriate relations" with prisoners.

Eight of those worked on the same wing and two were senior warders.

They are accused of smuggling in Class A drugs, mobile phones and sim cards for inmates. It understood to have happened over a lengthy period.

The source said: "A mobile phone can command around £300 on a general wing. It's big business.

"The officers were working together and a smuggling racket formed a lucrative sideline. Corruption among warders is endemic.

"The Prison Service fears there could be up to 1,000 bent officers across the country."

He said the action at Pentonville was "intended to send out a strong message to other prisons".

A top-level inquiry published earlier this month revealed widespread corruption in our jails.

The Prison Service anti-corruption report stated crooked warders were running mobile phone and drug rackets across the system.

But the Home Office admitted yesterday it had no plans to widen the investigation.

A spokesman said: "Allegations of corruption at Pentonville are being investigated at the moment. However, we are not investigating any other officers for corruption.

"We are aware of the report, but we have no plans to investigate corruption further."

The Prison Officers' Association blasted the decision. Chief Brian Caxton hit out: "It is irresponsible and unforgivable that the Prison Service knows the scale of corruption and is not prepared to do anything about it."


MCGUINNESS

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Reply with quote  #11 

I'm sure if you got a good writer/writers(reg or paul) your stories would be a smash, I for one have been seriosly thinking of writing such a book and i'm a lot younger than yourself, having spent a lot of time inside and hearing lots of stories from the older cons I'm sure you could have a potential best seller on you hands, if you want any of my stories which when i think about them always make me laugh like f***, geez a shout, its not all bad in the nick, we just have to make the best out of a bad situation, dont we mate, still hated every fuckin second though ha! ha! bring it on!!!!!!!! giny fae killie

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Reply with quote  #12 

Hi MCGUINNESS!

 

Indeed some jail stories are fascinating albeit I have not found myself in that position yet.

 

If you feel that you have some good stories to tell why not post one and let us read it.

 

Don't worry about spelling as you can use the spellchecker at the bottom before you post (I use it all the time).

 

Any other info you need the you can use the 'PRIVATE MESSAGE' direct to me (H6).

 

Kind regards.


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'Bullied' prison attacker jailed
Shotts Prison
The attack took place in Shotts Prison's D Hall
A prisoner who attacked a fellow inmate after east and west coast rivalry ended in violence has been given a five-and-a-half year prison sentence.

John McGuinness, from Dundee, assaulted his victim as a result of bullying from west of Scotland prisoners, the High Court in Edinburgh heard.

The 25-year-old admitted the attack on James Hannah in a dining room in Shotts Prison on 4 July last year.

McGuinness had been serving a five year sentence for assault to severe injury.

The court heard that Mr Hannah, 32, who had been jailed for five years for a string of thefts and breach of the peace, could still lose the sight of one eye as a result of the kicking and punching he suffered.

Advocate Jonathan Crowe, defending, said McGuinness was sent to Shotts, in Lanarkshire, during the last year of his sentence where the "majority" of prisoners were from the west coast.

"The east coasters are given a hard time by the west coasters in the form of threats and sometimes violence," he said.

'Serious offence'

Mr Crowe told the court that his client found himself being picked on and, on the day of the assault, heard a comment as he passed Mr Hannah which he took as a threat.

"As he heard it the red mist descended and he attacked Mr Hannah," said Mr Crowe.

"After a year of abuse at the hands of the west coasters McGuinness simply snapped and laid into Mr Hannah."

Judge Lord Wheatley heard that McGuinness punched and kicked his victim on the head, causing him to fall to the ground, where he continued the attack.

Sentencing McGuinness, he told him: "This was a serious, prolonged and unjustified offence which has caused unpleasant and lasting damage to your victim."


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MCGUINNESS

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This is without a doubt a seious problem in prisons across Scotland, particularly Glaswegians strangly enough, they seem to think that everybody else who is not from Glasgow is a choochter, a bam or a daftie, most of these Glasweigens have never been out of Glasgow in there life and think because the prison system is full of Glasweigens that they run the show, which, most of the time they do, occasionally we get an istance like this where somone just has enough of that shite, I have seen it many times. One particular time was in Polemont YOI, when a guy from Govan taxed a pair of trainers off of a guy from Johnstone, which resulted in Johnstone/Paisley/Edinburgh table setting about the Govan table with the metal dinner trays that we were served our dinner apon, one of the guys who was workig on the hotplate, threw a full urn of semolina into the  mix which caused every body to start sliding about while they were trying to fight, even the screws were breakdancing on it as they set about both teams with thier battons, thats when the rest of us stepped in. Instead of the screws just going in and puling they guys apart, they were knocking the shit out of the boys with sticks, needless to say the tables and chairs did fly, with us all rolling around in semolina it was rather funny, what a fucking doing we all got down the digger, we all got civvy charges for assaulting the screws i was done with 9 assaults and a breach of the peace, and i only threw one dinner tray!!! So we all got our lawyers in to take photoes of us covered from head to foot in bruises, and just like magic all the charges were dropped.There is still a lot of taxing and bullying going on in prisons, its just one of those things, first offenders are easy meat for gangs of yo's/cons who chain smoke.I would also like to add that the violence in Polemont by the screws is still rife, a documentary should be done on that place as the screws in there ae all dirty bullying scumbags.  

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Reply with quote  #15 

Hi MCGUINNESS and thank you for a fascinating insight into prison life.

 

I must say there were some rather funny bits in your post like the SEMOLINA WAR and by keeping things REAL.

 

Violence by prison officers against inmates especially in the YOI centers are a real cause for concern for all of us.

 

We cant leave the YO's to fend for themselves!

 

If you have any direct info on assaults post them on this site and we will expose them.


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