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Magpie

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Reply with quote  #46 
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The TimesSeptember 20, 2006

                       

Jail dog sniffs out illicit phones

                       
                                                               
                                                                                                       
A sniffer dog has become the first in Britain to be trained to search out mobile phones in jails. Murphy, a 15-month-old English springer spaniel, undertook his first trial at Norwich prison yesterday.

The dog, from a rescue centre in Ipswich, has been trained to sniff out the phones, which are regarded as a security risk.

James Shanley, the prison governor, said: “If somebody has access to a mobile phone in prison they can contact witnesses, or arrange for someone to meet them at a certain place.

“Phones can also take photographs, so could identify staff or other visitors to the prison.”

Mr Shanley said that about 500 mobile phones had been found in the region’s 12 prisons in the past 12 months.

“Murphy had his first live trial yesterday and got on very well,” he said.

“We know of no other dogs being trained in the same way at present.”


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Interesting. I wonder if the dog is actually sniffing out the phones or picking up on some kind of noise emitted from the phone.
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The TimesSeptember 21, 2006

                       

Prisoners will get drug-taking kits

                                               
               
                                                               
                                                                                                       
PRISONERS will be given personal drug-taking kits under a controversial new scheme to tackle the spread of HIV and hepatitis C in British jails.

Inmates at Craiginches Prison in Aberdeen, where drug-taking among prisoners was particularly high, will be the first to receive the kits. They include syringes, swabs, filters and a sharps disposal box.



The Scottish Prison Service (SPS) has confirmed that the pilot programme was planned for early next year, after a Glasgow Caledonian University report. It concluded that prisoners regarded the drug problem in Scotland’s jails as unstoppable.

Their views echoed a Home Office report last month, which confirmed that drug use was commonplace within prisons in England and Wales.

That study stated that some supposedly drug-free wings were awash with illegal drugs and depicted a world where heroin, cannabis, crack and non-prescribed medications all circulated freely.

Interviewees said that obtaining drugs was relatively straightforward. Drugs entered prisons by social visits, in the mail, through new prisoners, via contact with friends on the outside after court appearances, or in bundles thrown over the perimeter wall. They were then exchanged in prison churches, gyms, workshops, education classes, during visits and in queues.

With the continued proliferation of illicit drug-taking in prisons has come a serious infection problem, which the Craiginches pilot scheme aims to address.

The SPS said yesterday that if the behaviour of prisoners taking drugs could not be changed, the service had a responsibility both to inmates and to prison staff to ensure their safety. A decision to introduce the kits will be taken by the prison service and will not have to be approved by Scottish Executive ministers.

The SPS added that the kits would reflect needle exchange programmes that existed in the community and would be modelled on similar schemes in the Republic of Ireland, Switzerland, Germany and Spain.

The Court of Appeal in London has already dismissed a case brought by an English prisoner under human rights laws to have needle exchange programmes introduced in jails south of the border.

The SPS spokesman added: “We’ve looked at international research which shows that the introduction of the safe injection programmes reduces drug injecting.”

Last year alone, nearly 2,000 drugs packages were intercepted on their way to Scottish prisoners. Officials claim that human rights laws allowing contact between prisoners and their families mean that the authorities can never halt the flow of drugs into jails.

Annabel Goldie, the leader of the Scottish Tories and a campaigner for more treatment centres for drug addicts, said she could understand why the move was necessary, given the alarming levels of drug abuse in Scottish jails. “But we need a radical overhaul of rehabilitation structures in our jails. We should be helping prisoners get off drugs rather than helping them take them,” she said.

Investigations at prisons have illustrated the scale of the problem. Last month 14 officers at Pentonville, North London, were suspended in a corruption investigation involving the alleged smuggling of drugs into the jail.

The Home Office has given no indication that it will adopt the scheme for England and Wales if the pilot in Scotland proves successful.

A HABIT IN JAIL

  • Prison needle exchange programmes in Ireland, Switzerland, Germany and Spain have reduced dramatically HIV and hepatitis transmission rates



  • A recent study in Canada claimed that giving drug kits to prisoners did not lead to an increase in drug taking or cause needles to be used as weapons
  • A recent Home Office study suggested heroin, cannabis and crack were freely available in English and Welsh jails
  • A survey of 6,200 in Scottish jails showed that a third had used drugs in the previous month with 128 injecting. Seventy-eight of those had shared needles
  • Last year nearly 2,000 drugs packages were intercepted on their way to Scottish prisoners

  • ----------------------------------------------------



    hammer6

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    Reply with quote  #47 

    Jail dog sniffs out illicit phones...

    _42102358_dog203.jpg Phones smuggled into jails is a problem worldwide - this blog has an entire chapter devoted to Inmates and cell phones stories - as thanks to cell phones, convicts are able to stay in touch with the outside world and continue business as usual, running rackets, directing drug cartels, even ordering executions from behind bars.

    They are smuggled into jails in the most imaginative ways and have been found in toads, mayonnaise jars, in compost piles, a prisoner's bowels, the soles of their shoes, inside hollowed-out blocks of cheese, or alarmingly and more commonly, through a corrupt correctional officer.

    Now, it seems the UK may have come up with the perfect solution for detecting them. A sniffer dog, according to The Times..

    A sniffer dog has become the first in Britain to be trained to search out mobile phones in jails. Murphy, a 15-month-old English springer spaniel, undertook his first trial at Norwich prison yesterday.

    According to the BBC , Mel Barker, the dog trainer at Norwich Prison, said: "Every mobile phone has a scent which is unique to mobile phones. .


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    Reply with quote  #48 

    well dont it just prove the prison service are completely off there heads,if sniffer dogs cant combat the problem of drugs in a jail how will murphy the sniffer dog ever sniff a mobile phone out. maybe  murphy might be lucky and sniff out a voda bone,



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    Reply with quote  #49 

    More alarming is who thought that one up?

    Admin2

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    Reply with quote  #50 

    Interesting. I wonder if the dog is actually sniffing out the phones or picking up on some kind of noise emitted from the phone.

     

    Hi Magpie  I was confused myself until I read H6's post : 

     

    According to the BBC , Mel Barker, the dog trainer at Norwich Prison, said: "Every mobile phone has a scent which is unique to mobile phones. .


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    Reply with quote  #51 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by linda

    well dont it just prove the prison service are completely off there heads,if sniffer dogs cant combat the problem of drugs in a jail how will murphy the sniffer dog ever sniff a mobile phone out. maybe  murphy might be lucky and sniff out a voda bone,

    Good one Linda  

     

    Kano I also wonder who the hell thought that one up too........very sneaky eh?


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    Reply with quote  #52 

    Quote:

    According to the BBC , Mel Barker, the dog trainer at Norwich Prison, said: "Every mobile phone has a scent which is unique to mobile phones. .

     

     

    eh??????

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    Reply with quote  #53 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JKANE6364

    Quote:

    According to the BBC , Mel Barker, the dog trainer at Norwich Prison, said: "Every mobile phone has a scent which is unique to mobile phones. .

     

     

    eh??????

     
    Murphy at Norwich Prison
    Murphy has been trained to sniff out mobile phones
    Britain's first mobile phone sniffer dog has been tested out at Norwich Prison.

    Murphy, an English Springer Spaniel, has been specially trained to hunt out the mobile phone handsets - which have a particular scent.

    Mobiles are a big security risk in prisons. They have been used to plot escapes, threaten court witnesses and organise crime on the outside.

    About 500 have been found in jails in East Anglia in the past year.

    About 60 mobile phones have been found in searches inside Norwich Prison during the past 12 months, with prisoners prepared to pay £500 to get hold of one.

    Mel Barker, the dog trainer at Norwich Prison, said: "Every mobile phone has a scent which is unique to mobile phones. So we've homed in on that."

    The dog, which is 15 months old, came from an animal home in Ipswich, Suffolk.


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    Reply with quote  #54 

    Quote:

    Mel Barker, the dog trainer at Norwich Prison, said: "Every mobile phone has a scent which is unique to mobile phones. So we've homed in on that."

     

    right so all mobile phones have the same scent...i was thinking all different and then how they would know who had who`s.....then again there are some strange hiding places!!!!!!!!

    hammer6

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    Reply with quote  #55 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JKANE6364

    Quote:

    Mel Barker, the dog trainer at Norwich Prison, said: "Every mobile phone has a scent which is unique to mobile phones. So we've homed in on that."

     

    right so all mobile phones have the same scent...i was thinking all different and then how they would know who had who`s.....then again there are some strange hiding places!!!!!!!!

    Indeed there are some strange hiding places :-)


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    Reply with quote  #56 

    Anti-prison march due in capital
    Guantanamo Bay prison
    Protesters want to see an end to the Guantanamo Bay prison
    Protesters are to march in Edinburgh as part of an anti-Guantanamo Bay demonstration.

    Amnesty International supporters, backed by Scotland Against Criminalising Communities, will be in orange boiler suits on Thursday.

    After the walk to the parliament from the US Consulate in Regent Terrace MSPs will be urged to push the UK Government to take action over the US-run prison.

    A meeting will take place in committee room three, hosted by Tommy Sheridan.

    The meeting will include a screening of the documentary Outlawed - a film about alleged torture during the war on terror.


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    Reply with quote  #57 

    Jail moves to stop catapult trick
    HMP Liverpool
    String was fired over the fence with the catapults
    Prison bosses in Liverpool are taking action to stop inmates from using a catapult to smuggle in drugs.

    Prisoners at HMP Liverpool were using parts of rubber gloves tied to cell bars to fire out a weight, with long string attached, over the fence.

    Accomplices would then attach drugs or mobile phones which were reeled back in through the cell windows.

    The Prison Service would not confirm reports that grilles were being put on all cell windows to stop the practice.

    Criminal charges

    But a spokesman confirmed that measures were under way to prevent the scam happening again.

    He said: "Prisoners at HMP Liverpool were attempting to bring drugs into the prison in this way.

    "This was detected by staff, the items were recovered and steps are being taken to prevent prisoners from attempting this again.

    "HMP Liverpool has been working very closely with the local police to prevent drugs entering the prison and anyone attempting to do this will face criminal charges."


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    Reply with quote  #58 

    another sniffer dog like murphy needed up there too sniff out catapults and rubber gloves

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    Reply with quote  #59 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by linda

    another sniffer dog like murphy needed up there too sniff out catapults and rubber gloves

    Or a Rabbit to sniff out the sling


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    10 January 2007...

    By Ginny Sandringham

    It cropped up in a conversation I was having the other day: "You know Jamil's been able to speak to his wife don't you? They talked on the phone for an hour and we're still not really sure why it happened."
     
    Sarah Teather MP was telling me about the 'privilege' allowed to a man who has been detained in Guantanamo Bay for four years without trial.
     
    He has a wife, Sabah, and five children in London. They have had no contact with him, apart from the odd censored letter, for the whole time he's been there, until three months ago. Suddenly, out of the blue, they let him speak to his wife on the phone for an hour. She sat in a room on her own at the American Embassy in London and he sat in a guarded room thousands of miles away in Cuba.
     
    Sabah has not been forthcoming about what they talked about but she told her lawyer they cried a lot.
     
    Whatever your views on Guantanamo Bay and whether the British government should take responsibility for a man who is not a British 'citizen' but a British 'resident', it is difficult not to question the detention when you meet his family.

     

    Five children all under 10, who speak perfect English, who have not had a father for four years. The youngest, Mariam, has never even met her father as she was born after he was arrested. The oldest, Anas, has become overly protective of her. He is also doing all the media interviews and is so good at saying the right thing at the right time that it makes you feel slightly uncomfortable.
     
    They don't understand what has happened to him but they are starting to repeat things they hear on the news. 'It's all I can do to stop them getting confused and to remember him as he was before he was taken away', Sabah said.
     
    One of the girls, Badeeah, aged 6, was recently awarded a 'Good Citizen' certificate at her school. I asked her what she had to do to get it. "They told me I had been a good person and a good friend" she said. It is a credit to her, her mother and her brothers and sisters that she is growing up into such a polite and lovely little girl. The American government should take note.


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