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JK

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It amazes me when police befriend young women and bring them into their circle doing favours backward and forward. What is it exactly they want or am i just being bad minded? One I know of was befriended by a policeman an older man a crime had been committed but in the end no charges brought and this frienship continued I dont know the ins and outs of the friendship but dont like some of what ive seen and heard. Other woman or one in particular being asked to help police out in setting someone up and she goes ahead and does it and is quite open about it rumour has it as well that she was paid to do this Dont they realise the danger they are putting these women in? I know it happens on the other side of the coin too with criminals using people but as the word criminal suggests that would be expected of them but i certainly wouldnt expect those who are supposed to protect and serve to put people in danger like that. Also Im amazed that in the first case so much information can be passed from police to individuals and im taking it vice-versa suppose it just goes to show you never know who your friends are and why they are asking questions. I was going to put this in paedophile police but since the individual was over 16 i wont but i know what my thoughts are      


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JK

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Agree with you Ma but in this case the circumstances are pointing at the cops having a vulnerable person i.e domestic abuse trying to get away then they get the info they want As for the female involved i agree she`ll reep what she sowed one day there wasnt a problem when they were together so a woman scorned eh? I dont agree with set ups especially if your not an angel yourself as is in this case People amaze me at times good job im an angel with this all going on around me  


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Agree with you Ma usually i find anyway when you get rid of the clingers on you have more money anyway  As for them who like to batter women about had a few knocks that way myself and watched it for years when i was young every weekend usually the demon drink was the cause maybe thats why i dont bother with it  as for the meemaws rounding ye up oh i know that feeling did it to me one night  Like something out the keystone cops  Looking for some madman thought id had him in my car  As if....


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I asked someone once to teach me to shoot  Rabbits and stuff maybe its a good job he didnt there would be a few deed by now Setting folk up aye thats bad Ma so`s trying to drive them nuts  But again there time will come....


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I have never heard of any fit ups around my way with the police, ECT.But i bet it goes on.Sad is it.

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Aye....... is it  You seem strange tonight Frankie boy...what you up to???


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Police failed mother beaten to death in front of toddler, report finds

IPCC criticises Nottinghamshire force's 'systemic failures' and says 10 officers should face action in Casey Brittle case

Casey Brittle
Casey Brittle, 21, who was beaten to death by her ex-partner after police failed to intervene 11 times. Photograph: IPCC/PA

After their two-year-old daughter had watched Sanchez Williams beating Casey Brittle into unconsciousness in their living room, she was left alone with her dying mother for two hours.

It was not the first time the little girl had seen her father attack her 21-year-old mother. In the two years before her murder, at least 11 incidents of abuse and domestic violence by Williams had been reported to Nottinghamshire police by Brittle, her friends, neighbours and family. None resulted in criminal charges. Some of the desperate calls for protection were not even followed up.

On Tuesday, the Independent Police Complaints Commission revealed that, despite those repeated pleas for help, Nottinghamshire police had failed to take even the most basic of steps to protect Brittle and her daughter.

In a scathing report, the IPCC revealed it had recommended that 10 officers face disciplinary charges, including misconduct, after the young mother was "significantly let down by systemic failures" in Nottinghamshire police service.

Six officers pleaded guilty to misconduct in relation to Brittle's calls for help. No further action was taken against two of them, while three received "management action" and the sixth was given a written warning. Four other officers were subject to unsatisfactory performance procedures, a lower level of disciplinary action taken against officers whose behaviour is considered to be "at the lower end of the scale, such as lateness or rudeness", said an IPCC spokeswoman.

That Nottinghamshire police was also found guilty of systemic failures was "all the more horrifying", said IPCC commissioner Amerdeep Somal, who led the investigation, because two years before Brittle's death, another attack by an estranged husband on his former partner had revealed very similar flaws. That case had forced Nottinghamshire to admit its domestic abuse policy was "not fit for purpose".

The policy was removed from circulation but no substitute document was issued until March 2010 and, the IPCC investigation into Brittle's murder discovered, officers whose lack of knowledge had contributed to the 2008 incident were given no further training in domestic abuse.

The IPCC said the same culture of ignorance around domestic abuse was still widespread across Nottinghamshire police force. "The systemic failures … were compounded by the fact that the force had previously been warned about many of the same issues," said Somal.

"In this case it is clear that a number of officers failed to perform to the level expected of them and basic actions that may have helped others see the full picture of [Brittle's] suffering were not completed. However, it is clear that beside the failings of individual officers, Casey was significantly let down by systemic failures within Nottinghamshire police."

The IPCC investigation reported that on 3 October 2010, Brittle's daughter was heard crying and screaming at her home in New Basford. A next-door neighbour was said to have heard the child screaming: "I want my mummy." It was later established that the little girl had walked into the room four times to find her father carrying out the murder.

After her father left the house and her mother lay unconscious next door, the child was left alone in her bedroom for two hours. She is now being cared for by relatives. Williams was convicted of murder in March 2011 and sentenced to life imprisonment.

Despite admitting that "members of the public will no doubt be shocked by the findings of this investigation" and that "it may mean that victims may hesitate to report domestic abuse to the police", Somal said his investigation had failed to establish "with certainty" that "if officers or the force had served Casey better then she would still be alive today".

He said: "Williams was a violent offender with scant regard for the law. It is impossible to judge what impact any positive action taken by the force would have had on him and his attitude to Casey."

Brittle's mother, Victoria Blower, agreed. Describing her daughter's death as "the absolute worst day of my life," Blower said: "I know mistakes were made in dealing with previous attacks involving Casey, but there is only one person responsible for my daughter's death and that is Sanchez Williams.

"Maybe one small change in the way things were handled could have saved her, or maybe Sanchez Williams was a timebomb just waiting to explode and nothing that anybody could have said or done was ever going to prevent him from murdering Casey."

Blower praised Nottinghamshire police for the "positive action" they have taken since Casey's death. "I am glad to have been involved in their work to improve the handling of incidents of domestic violence," she added. "I would also urge people not to close their own eyes and ears if they see or hear somebody experiencing domestic abuse, but to pick up the phone and call the police. You never know, it might be your call that saves a person's life. It is too late for my beautiful bubbly girl, but don't let it be your daughter, neighbour or friend who is next."


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Reply with quote  #8 
Does William Lobban deserve the police protection he is now afforded since his campaign to save his local police station was to close due to the financial cuts that Police Scotland had to make? Does being a complete and utter paranoid wreck fall under the vulnerable person/s act enable him to have a high viz police presence in his home town when there is NO REAL crime taking place? The authorities know who they are dealing with and his name is well known for what he is under that mask of respectability he now try's to portray? One thing he will win at some stage is an Oscar [crazy][crazy]

“But you’re 45 now,” I said. “What are you going to do for a living? Your only experience is… Well, it’s not office work.”

“I’m writing the sequel to The Glasgow Curse,” he replied. “I’m partly using the chunks I had to cut out of the first manuscript. But I think that question about What am I going to do now? is a good one.

Experienced eyes: William Lobban

Older eyes: William Lobban looks forward

“In life, you’ve really got to know who you are and how others perceive you as a person. When a long-term prisoner comes out of prison… OK, I’ve been out of prison for a long, long time, but… Look, it’s all down to identity… It took me a long, long time to figure out what I was going to do and, in the last couple of years – since I started writing the book – it has created a whole new identity for me. Now I’ve got to use the identity to the best of my advantage, so people do perceive me as being an author.

Author is a title I actually like. I prefer that to Gangster. Believe me, it’s much better being called an author than a gangster (Ahemmm Judas)

[rolleyes][confused][eek]“My book’s a great start, but the hard work really starts now because the media are starting to get involved and the cops must now look at everything that’s going on. I would like to know how they view all this.


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