The Ferris Conspiracy Forum
Sign up  |   |   |  Calendar
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 5 of 5     «   Prev   2   3   4   5
Admin2

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 9,065
Reply with quote  #61 
Quote:
Originally Posted by steeleyma

Your in the best place here dealing with all of that, all of them in the know here will look out for you and help you if help is needed, exactly what this site is for , it is appauling what goes on deliberately blindfully still in this day n age bloody discracefull , xxxma

Well said Ma


__________________
FIGHT FOR YOUR RIGHTS
Admin2

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 9,065
Reply with quote  #62 

Public confidence in our police force is at an all-time low. How will faith be restored?

You may not know of Michael Doherty, a former aircraft engineer from Middlesex. But chances are you soon will.

For, in a highly unusual use of the law, Mr. Doherty, has secured a private prosecution against two police officers who he accuses of forcing unlawful entry into his home one September in 2008 - and so much more besides. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2188837/Two-Met-Police-officers-smashed-way-aircraft-engineers-home-battering-ram-kidnapped-him.html

Since that eventful day - captured on a video that I have watched, my hand frequently and instinctively covering my mouth as the contents served to shock me - Michael has upped the pressure and is a passionate campaigner against police injustice. And I support him.

I have no intention of writing a rant in the style of 'all police are rubbish/bigots/thugs' – choose your invective - but something is definitely and unquestionably rotten within the ranks of Her Majesty's Constabulary.

We all know it and no number of apologies or portrayals of police as heroes can change that. And yet, still, we are slow to overhaul our forces of law and order. It's as if the full acknowledgement of the problem, and the task involved to rectify it, makes insecure our very presence of this here island.

And so it is left to people like Michael Doherty to fight the system, and at immense personal cost, but they carry on regardless because they are confident in the belief that the truth will come out in the end.

Just as it did last week when we witnessed the true horror that took place at a football match in Hillsborough over 23 years ago.

Once again, the hidden problems within our police forces were blown wide open and the image to emerge was ugly and left all those involved tainted by it.

The Hillsborough Report revealed a gross miscarriage of justice against 96 dead loved ones and the acute pain that was left behind them.

Its publishing is a testament to all those who have fought long and hard to get justice for their loved ones - and against a system that conspired to prevent the truth from being told.

This time it was the police force of South Yorkshire who were exposed as the purveyors of a deeply intertwined - and Margaret Thatcher-sanctioned - series of deliberate distortions in the eighties.

Police officers created and spread lies and slurs against dead people in an attempt to shift, and consequently escape, blame for their role in the tragedy.

The sheer scale of SYP's corruption – including the now West Yorkshire police chief, Sir Norman Bettinson, himself currently subject to an investigation of the eternally-hopeless Independent Police Complaints Commission - was laid bare for all to see.

Not that a police force failing to protect its people is peculiar to South Yorkshire Police. Problems inherent within Her Majesty's system are not restricted to regional location.

This was again emphasised following the recent ruling of PC Simon Harwood, found not guilty of the killing of newspaper vendor Ian Tomlinson in 2009 during the G20 protests in the City of London.

On the evening of that verdict, unhappy crowds, incensed and bewildered by the decision, gathered outside New Scotland Yard and demanded justice for Mr. Tomlinson and other victims of police treatment.

One sign proclaimed: '1433 people have died following contact with police since 1990. Zero police officers have been convicted.'

And therein lies a serious grievance. One that anti-police corruption groups up and down the country are screaming about long and loud - and are failing to have their anger taken as seriously as it should be.

What we actually get when these cases are revealed, and mostly shown to be as something of an isolated incident, is a sop. A metaphorical smacked wrist, here and there. If that.

For those aggrieved by their police handling, what remains is a deep sense of injustice and persistent question marks over the acts that have taken place. The net result being unimaginable pain for those involved. And justice, increasingly, is not served.

These cases include, but are certainly not limited to, the high profile deaths of musician Smiley Culture - bizarrely found to have 'stabbed himself' during an arrest by police in his home - and Tottenham man Mark Duggan.

Mr Duggan's shooting by police marked the start of the UK riots in August 2011. The circumstances of his death remain hideously unclear. This was a man who, according to the IPCC, had a gun one minute and then didn't when the final verdict came through.

On a visceral level we know that some police forces are continuing to fail institutionally. We've known it for years. Report after report confirms this.

From McPherson's inquiry into the murder of Stephen Lawrence to Levenson's into media and police corruption, we know, categorically, that there are many aspects of our police force that display a far from model-like behaviour towards the people they are supposed to protect.

Let us not forget, the constabulary has been shown to be a place where proven thugs like Simon Harwood are allowed on the front-line despite revealing previously troubling form.

Fact is, the police force is a mess of human weaknesses because it's staffed by humans and, as we all know, we're fallible.

I'm a people observer and I find it makes sense to factor human nature into any equation that involves people.

We don't arrive at our workplace value-free. We don't remove our attitudes and behaviour, as if they are coats and gloves, when we walk through the door into our professional life.

All that baggage, good and bad, comes with us. As it did with Simon Harwood and other police personnel, who have been caught short and found seriously wanting.

So it comes as something of a surprise to the system to learn, today, that PC Simon Harwood may finally be relieved of his duties. He has been found guilty of gross misconduct, not manslaugher, and, quite wrongly, he will still receive his police pension.

In reality, sections of the police force have conspired against the public for years. It's one of the reasons that Stephen Lawrence's killers were able to get away with his murder for so long.

Yes, of course, there are decent police - I am personally acquainted with several them. I feel deeply sorry for my police friends. They entered the force to, quite literally, 'serve and protect' and they have been let down by criminality within the system. Tarred with a brush that makes their daily work a whole lot harder to carry out.

So, yes, there are clear problems within our police system and the more that is exposed, frankly, the better. But, to paraphrase the famous expression, justice must not only be done but be seen to be done, too.

Our country needs a police service - that's right, a service - that holds dear the notion that its first duty, above all else, is to protect its people. The question is, who is going to protect us from them in the meantime?


__________________
FIGHT FOR YOUR RIGHTS
hammer6

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 8,395
Reply with quote  #63 

__________________
The TRUTH is out there...........
Admin2

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 9,065
Reply with quote  #64 
"Noble cause corruption" as ethical corruption is a departure from conventional discussions on police corruption, which typically focus on monetary corruption. According to the field of Police Ethics, noble cause corruption is police misconduct "committed in the name of good ends." In Police Ethics it argued that some of the best officers are often the most susceptible to noble cause corruption.[14] According to professional policing literature, noble cause corruption includes "planting or fabricating evidence, lying or the fabrication and manipulation of facts on reports or through testimony in court, and generally abusing police authority to make a charge stick."[15] According to Robert Reiner, a professor at the London School of Economics, stops based on statistical discrimination are also a form of noble cause corruption
__________________
FIGHT FOR YOUR RIGHTS
hammer6

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 8,395
Reply with quote  #65 
[police_officer_assume_i_am_never_wrong_postcard-r0c6ce953b8bf4bf5af1418c9bb73d944_vgbaq_8byvr_512]

__________________
The TRUTH is out there...........
JK

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,688
Reply with quote  #66 
[rofl][rofl] Perfectly true [thumb]
__________________
"Better to die on your feet than live on your knees"
Admin2

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 9,065
Reply with quote  #67 
Robocop 2013 Sir Stephen House Vision of Police Scotland [eek][comp][thumb][wave]



__________________
FIGHT FOR YOUR RIGHTS
hammer6

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 8,395
Reply with quote  #68 

__________________
The TRUTH is out there...........
hammer6

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 8,395
Reply with quote  #69 
Trust in police 'severely shaken' by corruption:

Public trust in the police has been severely shaken by recent corruption scandals, a major report warned yesterday.

In a worrying assessment, Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Constabulary Tom Winsor said the public felt badly let down by the failure of officers to live up to expected standards of integrity.

The Stephen Lawrence investigation, Hillsborough, Plebgate, revelations about undercover officers, the death of Ian Tomlinson during the G20 riots and other recent controversies have, he said, left the police damaged – despite ordinary bobbies being more honest than they were in the 1960s and 1970s.

 
 

 

In his 163-page assessment of the State of Policing in England and Wales, Mr Winsor concludes forces are: 

  • Failing properly to investigate home break-ins, domestic abuse and car crime;
  • Ill-prepared and ill-equipped to deal with new types of crime such as online fraud;
  • Leaving officers with primitive technology more than a decade old;
  • Mired in inefficiency and unnecessary bureaucracy.
  •  

But it is his conclusions around public trust in the police which will raise the most concern.

 
 
He wrote: ‘Controversies and revelations of a serious and negative nature in relation to the conduct of some police officers, both past and present, have hurt public confidence in the police, and the morale of the very great majority of honest, hardworking, committed and brave police officers has suffered as a consequence.

uncompromising establishment of the truth.

Those who have violated the high standards that police officers should abide by deserve firm treatment, the report said.

It said: ‘[The public’s] expectations are that police officers will adhere to standards of honesty and conduct which are appreciably higher than those demanded of most others. And it is in that respect that the public feel badly let down – and perhaps afraid – when police officers are exposed as having failed.’

Before he was appointed to head the HMIC, Mr Winsor wrote two reports proposing widespread and radical reforms of the police.

Until then, policing workplace practices were ‘stale and discredited’ and some officers developed a sense that forces ‘deserved to be insulated from fundamental and searching review’, he concluded.

The failure properly to combat the huge rise in cybercrime had handed the advantage to offenders and left the public at risk.




__________________
The TRUTH is out there...........
hammer6

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 8,395
Reply with quote  #70 

url.png


__________________
The TRUTH is out there...........
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.