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Admin2

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Quote:
Originally Posted by linda

admin2. would you beleave a certain party of cats arses have been given a mobile home down here.for fears of saftey.good aint it how the police spend tax payers money supplying paid informers with mobile homes so there on the road 24/7 as theyve done the damage and now have serious bum trouble.

Don't really surprise me with that lot Linda as they will promise these fools the world only to find themselves dumped on their ass when the trial is over or whenever they give evidence as a police witness....despite the obvious facts that they are not of good character (even rapists) so I have not a shred of sympathy for them at all


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No pleasure is comparable to the standing upon the vantage-ground of truth.

 

(Only if you can get a copper or a hired witness  to tell it)


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Reply with quote  #33 
                                               
                               
                                               
The Sunday TimesOctober 22, 2006

                       

Police ad offers cash for informers

                       
                                                               
                                                                                                       
A POLICE force is publicly offering criminals the chance to “earn hard cash” if they turn into “grasses” and inform on their fellow crooks, writes David Leppard.

The controversial scheme, which is being advertised on posters by Staffordshire police, suggests that if criminals are finding that “crime is not paying” they should turn to the scheme for money.



Under the headline “Wanted”, the posters ask criminals: “Are you tired of looking over your shoulder? Sweating every time there’s a knock on the door? Crime not paying for you? “Registered informants who pass reliable information to Staffordshire police can earn hard cash. Get a new start in life — for you and your family. Help us put criminals away, instead of you!” Chief Superintendent Nick Howe said that posters for the scheme were distributed last week in pubs, clubs and other “recreational areas” in Stafford.

He added that cash payments would vary from £50 to criminals who provided some help in solving burglaries to “several thousand pounds” for those who informed on drug dealers and other serious offences.

“We’ve had a positive response and we’ve been encouraged with the approaches we’ve received so far,” Howe said.

“I can understand an argument which questions whether this is a wise spending of public money. But if we put surveillance units out to follow people, that can run into several thousand pounds. If someone is telling us that at a given time and place an offence is being committed, then it can work out a very cheap option for the taxpayer.”

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'Squeal deals' for police informants aimed at netting crime bosses...

CRIMINALS who inform on their friends could be given FBI-style "squeal deal" incentives by police in an effort to crackdown on the bosses behind big-time organised crime.
Under new police plans, criminals could be given written contracts guaranteeing a reduced sentence if they give information that could lead to the prosecution of others.
They must first plead guilty to qualify, and will receive reduced sentences in return, in a move similar to that offered by the FBI in America.


The measures are part of the Police, Public Order and Criminal Justice (Scotland) Bill that could come into force as early as June. Ministers hope the formal plea bargains, which are being offered by the Scottish Drug Enforcement Agency and the new Serious and Organised Crime Agency, will encourage criminals to co-operate. Only one per cent of offenders in drug trafficking cases in Britain turn Queen's evidence, while in America criminals help in 26 per cent of cases.



Under the deal, an offender will win a reduced sentence if he has an "assistance agreement" from a prosecutor.
In deciding the length of sentence, courts will take into account the extent and nature of the assistance. Similar provisions will be introduced in England and Wales on 3 April, under the Serious and Organised Crime and Police Act 2005.

However, some legal experts believe it will lead to more miscarriages of justice, with fears that criminals could offload the blame on to others.

Bill Aitken, MSP, the Conservatives' justice spokesman, questioned the need to make the practice formal, when it had been used by prosecutors in Scotland "for years".

Mr Aitken said: "This government cannot leave anything alone. It is absolutely amazing what has to be written into law these days because, basically, those at the top level have no experience of life.

"This should not be included in the act and it will further highlight those who cooperate with prosecutors and will lead to them being the subject of further reprisals," Mr Aitken added


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The growing power of police informers, many of them hardened criminals, has led to a ban on secret backhanders and a clampdown on soft jail terms in exchange for information.

In future, "grasses" must pay tax on their fees ­ which previously went undeclared ­ and agree to their names being placed a special register.

The clampdown follows a government investigation into the relationship between the police and informers, who have in the past included such gangland figures as Kenneth Noye, the road-rage murderer of Stephen Cameron. Noye had a long career as an informer and collected large sums for pointing police in the direction of villains ­ many of whom were rivals he simply wanted out of the way.

Another gangland figure to benefit from the informer system was Curtis Warren, whose criminal empire was so vast that he was dubbed "Target One" by Interpol. However, a case against him was dropped because his co-accused, Brian Charrington, was a valuable police informer.

Warren is now in jail but only after making an estimated £180m from drug dealing.

Customs routinely pay up to £1,000 per kilo of heroin or cocaine recovered and payments of £250,000 or more are relatively common to informers. This is considered a worthwhile investment in return for the number of man hours saved on investigations.

The practice of early release for prisoners who have informed on criminal gangs, under special pardon known as the Royal Prerogative of Mercy, is to be curbed. It is thought that many informers take advantage of such deals to commit fresh crimes.


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Reply with quote  #36 

well not before time,although i cant see how taxing blood money and putting names on registers will help solve the problem when an informer is still being  allowed to go behind screens or on video links to give evidence,if Micheal Howard and hes corrupt family can get a slap on the wrist. early realease and a bucket full of blood money what message is that giving paid informers,



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Reply with quote  #37 

Totally agree with you Linda

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Reply with quote  #38 
Quote:
Originally Posted by linda

well not before time,although i cant see how taxing blood money and putting names on registers will help solve the problem when an informer is still being  allowed to go behind screens or on video links to give evidence,if Micheal Howard and hes corrupt family can get a slap on the wrist. early realease and a bucket full of blood money what message is that giving paid informers,

Indeed linda:

The practice of early release for prisoners who have informed on criminal gangs, under special pardon known as the Royal Prerogative of Mercy, is to be curbed.

 

It is thought that many informers take advantage of such deals to commit fresh crimes.


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Thomas McGraw

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Thomas "The Licensee" McGraw (b. 1953) is an organized crime figure involved in extortion, narcotics and drug trafficking in Glasgow, Scotland. One of the wealthiest businessmen in Glasgow, he owns numerous businesses including securities companies and taxi firms as well as properties throughout Scotland and Ireland with an estimated worth of £10 million. His drug trafficking activities are worth an estimated £14 million [1].

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Executive Guidelines:

There do not exist provisions, either in PACE or in other legislation, which indicate the permissible boundaries of undercover police operations. Nor do the Codes of Practice issued under PACE have anything to say on the issue. The main executive guidelines are contained in the Home Office Consolidated Circular to the Police on Crime and Kindred Matters (reprinted 1986) (Home Office Circular 35/1986). These guidelines state (in paragraph 1.92):

a. No member of a police force, and no public informant, should counsel, incite or procure the commission of a crime.

b. Where an informant gives the police information about the intention of others to commit a crime in which they intend that he shall play a part, his participation should be allowed to continue only where -

i. he does not actively engage in planning and committing the crime;

ii. he is intended to play only a minor role; and

iii. his participation is essential to enable the police to frustrate the principal criminals and to arrest them (albeit for lesser offences such as attempt or conspiracy to commit the crime, or carrying offensive weapons) before injury is done to any person or serious damage to property.

The informant should always be instructed that he must on no account act as agent provocateur, whether by suggesting to others that they should commit offences or encouraging them to do so....

It can be seen that the focus of the guidelines is upon the danger that undercover operations may actually result in the creation of crime, or may encourage or stimulate crime. This is, of course, a very real danger, for as Gary Marx has pointed out in his book on undercover operations in the United States (Marx 1988, pp 126-7), there are several ways in which undercover activity may "amplify" crime:

  1. It may generate a market for the purchase or sale of illegal goods and services and may indirectly generate capital for other illegality.
  2. It may generate the idea and motive for the crime.
  3. It may entail coercion, intimidation, trickery, or persuasion of a person not otherwise predisposed to commit the offense.
  4. It may offer a seductive temptation to a person who would not otherwise encounter it.
  5. It may provide the contraband or a missing resource or ingredients essential for the commission of the crime.
  6. It may provide the context for false records and framing.
  7. It may generate a covert opportunity structure for illegal actions on the part of the undercover agent or informant.
  8. It may lead to retaliatory violence against informers.
  9. It may stimulate a variety of crimes on the part of those who are not targets of the undercover operation.

Effectively create crime is unduly narrow. This may, of course, be a primary concern in relation to "old- style" undercover operations that are targeted at consensual crimes. Such operations are essentially facilitative operations in the sense that an opportunity is offered (and inducements may be given) to the suspect to commit an offence of a type that the police suspect is being continually committed - for example, the selling of illegal drugs. But the danger of creation of crime is clearly not a major consideration in the context of operations like those used in, for example, the Hall and Stagg cases, where the aim is to gain evidence of a single offence which has already been committed. The issue here is the more fundamental one of whether targeting individuals for the purpose of obtaining evidence is consistent with general concepts of fair play and with the presumption of innocence. There is, therefore, an urgent need for the Home Office guidelines to be revamped, updated, and extended considerably.


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Reply with quote  #41 

After being on the site a few month now I must say this post has had the most effect on me, as id never really thought about it much before. Having seen people being friendly with the police, maybe too friendly but at the time thinking they wouldnt do that! being on here has made me look at the "bigger picture" so to speak and 2+2 now really does =4. I never knew how low people could go to get their own way especially where police were concerned. so cheers for opening my eyes and i suppose in future to trust my own instincts and not just pass things off as innocent.  

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Eye opener Kano

 

UNDERCOVER POLICE OPERATIONS AND WHAT THE SUSPECT SAID (OR DIDN'T SAY)

by

Andrew L-T Choo,


Reader in Law, University of Leicester, <ac14@leicester.ac.uk>

and

Manda Mellors,


Research Student in Law, University of Leicester.

 

http://webjcli.ncl.ac.uk/articles2/choo2.html


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Quote:
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Thomas McGraw

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Thomas "The Licensee" McGraw (b. 1953) is an organized crime figure involved in extortion, narcotics and drug trafficking in Glasgow, Scotland. One of the wealthiest businessmen in Glasgow, he owns numerous businesses including securities companies and taxi firms as well as properties throughout Scotland and Ireland with an estimated worth of £10 million. His drug trafficking activities are worth an estimated £14 million [1].

Contents:

Thomas McGraw, 'The Licensee', is/was reportedly Glasgow's crime boss. Allegedly he has friends within the Glasgow police.

Reg McKay, in The Daily Record, 29 August 2005, reported that a street brawl between police left people scrutinising the cosy relationship between the Licensee and 'his police officer pals.'

"One of the Serious Crime Squad grabbed McGraw and tried to take him away from his Scottish Crime Squad captors. Tug of war was on. Then one man threw a punch and bedlam broke out with police wrestling, kicking and butting each other as McGraw stood in the middle of the battle totally ignored.

 

Locals gathered for the best entertainment they'd had in years. Duelling rozzers. One or two joined in, taking the chance of a free swipe at a copper.Eventually peace was restored and the two police outfits went into confab.

 

Whatever was said, the handcuffs were unlocked and Thomas McGraw walked back to his flat, a free man once again."

The Daily Record wrote: "Local uniforms and CID could often be found sitting in the McGraws' home drinking tea and smoking.

"When McGraw bought The Caravel pub, certain well-known detectives were in regularly, drinking heavily and never putting their hand in their pockets. It was too cosy."

Reportedly, McGraw and his brother-in-law, Snaz Adams, have links to Loyalist groups in Ireland. "Snaz was an honorary officer of the UDA and McGraw a lifelong supporter."

"In one of Britain's top accountancy firms, an accountant accidentally saw a file one day. It was McGraw's and it showed more than £20million in offshore accounts.

"That's only the money he has clean enough to be accounted for and only in this country, never mind his operations in Spain, the Canaries, Ireland and Germany.

"Police experts have little doubt his total wealth tops £30million....

"TC Campbell remembers, in the early 1980s, sitting with The Licensee and some members of the BarL Team when two of McGraw's police contacts had obvious suntans at a time when Margaret was abroad.

"The cops teased McGraw about how his wife looked nude, a mole here, a small birthmark there, the noise she made.

Paul Ferris, in his book, The Ferris Conspiracy, accused McGraw of fitting up innocent people and passing information to the cops in return for immunity from prosecution.

 

http://pierrejoubert.blogspot.com/2006/05/murder-capital-of-europe.html


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Ulster Volunteer Force mural

Ulster Volunteer Force mural...

 

The Ulster Volunteer Force members, based in north Belfast, were protected by Special Branch handlers to ensure they escaped prosecution, with vital intelligence withheld from detectives investigating the killings, a three-year inquiry found.

The man at the centre of Police Ombudsman Nuala O'Loan's examination of the scandal, identified in her 160-page report only as Informant No 1 but known to be ex-terror chief Mark Haddock, was paid at least £79,840 during the period under investigation from 1991 to 2003.

The Ombudsman concluded that her investigation had established collusion between certain officers within Special Branch and the UVF team based in the city's Mount Vernon district.

Her staff identified intelligence within the policing system, most of which was graded by police as reliable and probably true and corroborated by other sources, which linked the informants to the murders of 10 people.

 

They were also associated with another 72 crimes, including 10 attempted murders, 10 punishment shootings, 13 punishment attacks, a bombing in Monaghan in the Irish Republic, and 17 instances of drug dealing as well as additional criminal damage, extortion and intimidation.

The Police Ombudsman's investigators also identified less significant and reliable intelligence linking the UVF men to an additional five murders.

The chilling revelations are massively damaging for policing in Northern Ireland, and deal a shattering blow to the reputation of the Royal Ulster Constabulary.

Mrs O'Loan said: "It would be easy to blame the junior officers' conduct in dealing with various informants and indeed they are not blameless.

"However, they could not have operated as they did without the knowledge and support at the highest level of the RUC and the PSNI."


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Martin McGuinness
Mr McGuinness said Gilmour must decide whether it is safe to return
Former republican "supergrass" Raymond Gilmour has said he wants to return to his native Londonderry.

He was a member of the INLA and the IRA and his evidence brought dozens of people to trial in the early 1980s.

The case collapsed when the then Lord Chief Justice dismissed his evidence as being "unworthy of belief".

Raymond Gilmour is now asking Sinn Fein leaders to promise he would be safe if he returned to Derry, where he still has relatives.

"I would like Martin McGuinness's assurances, and Gerry Adams's, and whoever else is in charge of Sinn Fein," he said.

'Going into hiding'

"Maybe not to live there, but maybe to come over for a wee holiday, or something like that.

"The only regrets I have are leaving all of my family behind me.

"I am suffering for it now. I have a heart complaint, I'm an alcoholic. You name it - I have all the psychological problems that go along with the things that I have done in the past."

Gilmour said he has not been back to his home city since going into hiding 25 years ago.

Mr Gilmour fled the city in 1982 after giving evidence against 35 republicans.

Martin McGuinness said Mr Gilmour must decide for himself whether or not it was safe to return to Derry and that he was not under threat from Sinn Fein, nor - he believes - from the IRA.

He said if exiles such as Gilmour wanted to return home, it was a matter for their own judgement and their ability to make peace with the community.

The SDLP's Alex Attwood said personal safety for anyone who had been exiled should be guaranteed.

He said they were entitled to return and that there were "no conditions, no constraints, no objections laid on them".

"Everybody in the community must make sure there are no constraints, or restrictions laid on them," he said.


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