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Some of the victims were: Top row: Eamon Fox, Sharon McKenna, Thomas Shepherd; Bottom Row:  Gary Convey, Tommy English, Raymond McCord Jnr
Those murdered were all victims of the UVF
A Sinn Fein delegation has discussed collusion between police and loyalist killers with Prime Minister Tony Blair.

It follows last week's Police Ombudsman's report which said Special Branch officers gave a UVF gang behind murders in north Belfast immunity.

Speaking after the meeting, Mr Adams said: "Collusion was clearly an integral part of British government policy in Ireland.

"Successive British governments have covered it up."

He added: "I reminded Mr Blair that 10 years ago when we first met him in Downing Street we gave him a file on collusion and in particular the murder of Pat Finucane and the role of British Agent Brian Nelson.

"This morning I again raised with him the Pat Finucane case."

Prosecuted

Police colluded with loyalists behind over a dozen murders in north Belfast, the Ombudsman said.

The Special Branch officers "created false notes" and blocked searches for UVF weapons, said the ombudsman's report.

They also paid almost £80,000 to leading loyalist Mark Haddock, jailed for 10 years last November for an attack on a nightclub doorman.

The report, published last Monday, called for a number of murder investigations to be re-opened.

But it is unlikely that any of the police officers involved will be prosecuted - the ombudsman said that evidence was deliberately destroyed to ensure there could not be prosecutions.

The ombudsman's investigation began more than three years ago when Belfast welder Raymond McCord claimed that his son, also called Raymond, had been killed by a police informer.

The former RAF man, 22, Mr McCord jnr, was a member of the UVF who had some involvement in drugs.


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Reply with quote  #47 
16 February 2007
9/11 COURT CLAIM.

A SUPERGRASS yesterday claimed that one of the 21/7 bomb plot suspects was a supporter of al-Qaeda and approved of September 11.

Codenamed Mr Bexhill for the court, the witness said Yassin Omar was "fanatical and radical" and a supporter of Osama bin Laden and jailed cleric Abu Hamza.

Omar, 26, of New Southgate, north London, and five others deny conspiracy to murder and cause explosions. The trial at Woolwich Crown Court continues.


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1 March 2007
NEW LURE TO CRACK CRIMES  

LAWS encouraging crooks to give evidence against each other come into force today.

Those who agree to cooperate will be able to strike a deal with the authorities.

Justice Minister Cathy Jamieson said: "Turning criminals against their associates is an important weapon in the fight against organised crime.

"These measures will help increase the number of prosecutions against the most evil people in our society and spread confusion and distrust among the criminal fraternity."

Until now, there has been no formal way under Scots law by which the courts can take account of help given by an accused person in return for a reduced sentence.

Under the new system, the courts don't have to impose a lower sentence but, if they don't, they have to explain why.

Witnesses will be granted immunity from prosecution in exceptional circumstances.


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Reply with quote  #49 

That`ll cause more trouble than anything else for those who decide to "grass" who`s bright idea was that eh? Saw Cathy Jamieson boasting bout it on t.v this morning

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You will get the most depraved informant who actually committed the crime/s in the first place GRASSING an innocent who the POLICE have targeted in order to get a result in court.......the whole idea stinks and is well open to abuse!


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 ARCHIVE: Hold The Front Page http://www.ferrisconspiracy.com

 

'Squeal deals' for police informants aimed at netting crime bosses...

CRIMINALS who inform on their friends could be given FBI-style "squeal deal" incentives by police in an effort to crackdown on the bosses behind big-time organised crime.
Under new police plans, criminals could be given written contracts guaranteeing a reduced sentence if they give information that could lead to the prosecution of others.
They must first plead guilty to qualify, and will receive reduced sentences in return, in a move similar to that offered by the FBI in America.
The measures are part of the Police, Public Order and Criminal Justice (Scotland) Bill that could come into force as early as June. Ministers hope the formal plea bargains, which are being offered by the Scottish Drug Enforcement Agency and the new Serious and Organised Crime Agency, will encourage criminals to co-operate. Only one per cent of offenders in drug trafficking cases in Britain turn Queen's evidence, while in America criminals help in 26 per cent of cases.



Under the deal, an offender will win a reduced sentence if he has an "assistance agreement" from a prosecutor.
In deciding the length of sentence, courts will take into account the extent and nature of the assistance. Similar provisions will be introduced in England and Wales on 3 April, under the Serious and Organised Crime and Police Act 2005.

However, some legal experts believe it will lead to more miscarriages of justice, with fears that criminals could offload the blame on to others.

Bill Aitken, MSP, the Conservatives' justice spokesman, questioned the need to make the practice formal, when it had been used by prosecutors in Scotland "for years".

Mr Aitken said: "This government cannot leave anything alone. It is absolutely amazing what has to be written into law these days because, basically, those at the top level have no experience of life.

"This should not be included in the act and it will further highlight those who cooperate with prosecutors and will lead to them being the subject of further reprisals," Mr Aitken added.

 

http://www.ferrisconspiracy.com/press_comment.asp


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THOMAS McGRAW has spent three decades amassing one of Britain's biggest criminal fortunes.

Little of his ill-gotten wealth remains in any British bank after being ploughed into offshore accounts and property across Europe from Ireland to Poland.

Like most of the new gangland aristocracy, McGraw's £14million fortune is built on drugs, violence, robbery and extortion.

Muscular McGraw, 51, usually seen in T-shirt and jeans, pioneered elaborate smuggling routes to bring in vast drugs consignments.

And he built a maze of bank accounts and front firms to conceal and clean his dirty money.

His nickname - The Licensee - could have come from his former involvement in the infamous Caravel pub in Glasgow's east end.

Or it could be, as his enemies claim, because he was a prolific police informer and was given a "licence" to operate in return.

Tam Bagan, a former associate, also claimed McGraw had "turned" a dirty dozen police officers with information and bribes, sparking the biggest corruption probe the Strathclyde force had ever launched.

The Caravel, which was run and, on paper at least, owned by McGraw's wife Margaret, was suddenly demolished hours before the arrival of detectives investigating a notorious double murder.

It was flattened as gangland touts identified the pub as the venue for the infamous double hit on Joe Hanlon and Bobby Glover.

The Licensee has been quizzed by police investigating some of Scotland's most notorious crimes, including the Ice Cream Wars murder of six members of the Doyle family.

He once offered to lead customs officers to a kilogramme of heroin and a rocket launcher - in return for £170,000 of confiscated drugs money.

McGraw promised the consignment of drugs and arms while attempting to retrieve cash taken from criminal cohort John Healy, as he tried to carry it through customs at Heathrow after arriving from a "business" trip to Spain.

The two later stood trial accused of funding and masterminding one of Scotland's most audacious drugs runs using a youth football team's minibus to bring in huge quantities of cannabis from the Costa del Sol.

Healy, 45, was jailed for 10 years after becoming one of three men convicted following the 55-day trial. McGraw and seven other accused walked free.

The trial was a watershed for police and criminals alike. An estimated £10million was spent prosecuting the biggest gangster ever put in a Scots dock.

And he got off.

The police evidence, based on analysis of telephone records and months of surveillance, gave the gangsters the best insight into the methods being used by modern crimebusters - and the ways to beat them.

After the trial, and at regular intervals ever since, McGraw is said to have been ready to flee his fortified bungalow in Mount Vernon, Glasgow, for a home in Tenerife after receiving death threats.

Against his better judgment, McGraw, who built his reputation in the famous Barlanark Team of robbers, has given one interview and has regretted it ever since.

In April 1995, he claimed to own nothing, with his homes and property companies all in the name of his wife.

He said: "Glasgow's a town called malice. Everybody's jealous of everybody else. Nobody likes to see you getting on.

Eighteen months later, on November 1, 1996, surveillance officers watched McGraw and two henchmen return to one of Healy's pubs in Thornliebank.

 


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Reply with quote  #53 

Good work there Bill  

 

He once offered to lead customs officers to a kilogramme of heroin and a rocket launcher - in return for £170,000 of confiscated drugs money.

McGraw promised the consignment of drugs and arms while attempting to retrieve cash taken from criminal cohort John Healy, as he tried to carry it through customs at Heathrow after arriving from a "business" trip to Spain.


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Seized heroin
Police suspected the informers were major heroin traffickers.

 

Some of Britain's leading heroin smuggling suspects were protected from police investigations because they were working as informers for Customs, the BBC has been told.

In one case in 2001, Foreign Office diplomats moved to secure the release of an informer held in Germany on a warrant from the Greek authorities.

A former drugs specialist from the National Criminal Intelligence Service told Radio 4's File on 4 the treatment given to Andreas Antoniades made him "livid".

At the time the service - now amalgamated into the Serious Organised Crime Agency - was preparing to target claims he was bringing heroin into Britain.

It is common practice to use criminals as a source of information.

But the allegations suggest a special form of protection was being given to several people suspected by police of being leading importers of heroin.

"Customs told me he had been an informant and that he had been the best informant Customs ever had and what he had given the UK far exceeded the damage he had done, which was absolute rubbish," the former NCIS officer said.

"If you protect those people to get information about the guys who are dealing with a kilo, it really doesn't make the system work."

'Historic cases'

Mr Antoniades, 75, who is now believed to be living in Dubai, has never been convicted of any drugs offence.

But a string of people, some from the Turkish and Greek communities, have launched appeals against drug trafficking convictions based on his information.

Since these cases occurred there have been many changes in our handling procedures
Customs statement

A lawyer handling some of the cases said many informers regarded themselves, rightly or wrongly, as untouchables.

Siobhan Egan said the "balance of power between the informants and their handlers was corrupted".

"It is the only word you can use when you have a handful of informants who are working for a variety of agencies and these individuals are invariably criminally active," she said.

Customs declined to be interviewed by the BBC about the cases or the way informers are handled.

In a statement it said many of the cases looked at are historic and there are "complex issues involved and they are the subject of current consideration before the Court of Appeal".

It added: "Since these cases occurred there have been many changes in our handling procedures".

'Life threatened'

Greek Cypriot Mr Antoniades came to the UK in the late 1950s after working for British intelligence as an agent in the Cypriot civil war.

He was once jailed for four years after a shooting incident in west London.

He worked as an informer until the 1990s when reports emerged he was involved in drug trafficking.

In 2001, the Greek authorities accused him of trafficking and he was arrested in Germany on an extradition warrant.

Telegrams, formally sent by Foreign Secretary Jack Straw addressing Mr Antoniades' case, instructed diplomats to persuade the Germans to release him.

Diplomats were told to "press the case for Mr Antoniades' release immediately" with German state and federal justice ministers.

They were requested to point out that "a public trial in Greece would reveal Mr Antoniades' long career as an informant for Customs and Excise and put his life at risk from criminal elements".

A spokesman for Mr Straw, now Leader of the House of Commons, referred inquiries to the Foreign Office who in turn asked the BBC to contact Customs.

Hear the full story on Radio 4: File on 4 Tue 6 March at 2000 GMT

 


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Reply with quote  #55 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Admin2

 
Some of the victims were: Top row: Eamon Fox, Sharon McKenna, Thomas Shepherd; Bottom Row:  Gary Convey, Tommy English, Raymond McCord Jnr
Those murdered were all victims of the UVF
A Sinn Fein delegation has discussed collusion between police and loyalist killers with Prime Minister Tony Blair.

It follows last week's Police Ombudsman's report which said Special Branch officers gave a UVF gang behind murders in north Belfast immunity.

Speaking after the meeting, Mr Adams said: "Collusion was clearly an integral part of British government policy in Ireland.

"Successive British governments have covered it up."

He added: "I reminded Mr Blair that 10 years ago when we first met him in Downing Street we gave him a file on collusion and in particular the murder of Pat Finucane and the role of British Agent Brian Nelson.

"This morning I again raised with him the Pat Finucane case."

Prosecuted

Police colluded with loyalists behind over a dozen murders in north Belfast, the Ombudsman said.

The Special Branch officers "created false notes" and blocked searches for UVF weapons, said the ombudsman's report.

They also paid almost £80,000 to leading loyalist Mark Haddock, jailed for 10 years last November for an attack on a nightclub doorman.

The report, published last Monday, called for a number of murder investigations to be re-opened.

But it is unlikely that any of the police officers involved will be prosecuted - the ombudsman said that evidence was deliberately destroyed to ensure there could not be prosecutions.

The ombudsman's investigation began more than three years ago when Belfast welder Raymond McCord claimed that his son, also called Raymond, had been killed by a police informer.

The former RAF man, 22, Mr McCord jnr, was a member of the UVF who had some involvement in drugs.

IRA 'collusion' inquiry launched...

 

Claims of collusion between members of the IRA and the security forces will be investigated by the Police Ombudsman.

Nuala O'Loan will initially look into six incidents over a 20-year period.

It is thought that a number of IRA killers were protected from prosecution because they were working as agents for Special Branch and other agencies.

Alfredo Scappaticci
Mr Scappaticci has vehemently denied he was "Stakeknife"

One line of inquiry will focus on Belfast man Freddie Scappaticci, who was unmasked almost four years ago as an IRA informer codenamed Stakeknife.

He was head of the IRA's notorious internal security unit, which interrogated and killed those it decided were informers.

Three IRA members were shot dead by the unit in July 1992, and it is claimed they were killed to protect another more high-ranking agent.

'Informant' claims

The scope of the investigation could be expanded if there are further credible allegations.

But Ms O'Loan said she was not yet labelling anyone as an informer.

"On the republican side, the allegations are that there was protection of republican criminals," she said.

"And in some cases the suggestion is that there was a republican informant involved."

Investigators have already been in touch with the police - and will soon be contacting the Army and intelligence agencies.

They will ask for information about some of the IRA agents alleged to have been working for them.

The family of a man murdered by the IRA want his killing to be included in Mrs O'Loan's investigation.

Anthony McKernan from the Markets area of Belfast was shot dead by the IRA in January 1988.

The IRA said he was an informer, an allegation that Mr McKernan's family has always denied.

They claim their father was one of those murdered to cover for Scappaticci.

Speaking on the Nolan Show, Mr McKernan's daughter, Sharon Murtagh, said they believed there was collusion in his killing. "It would have been in the British interest to take my father out because my father was a member of the IRA.

"He done jail, he was on the run, he was an alleged bomb maker although he was never charged with anything in connection with explosions.

"Our theory is that it would be in their interests to take him out. But we also feel that my father was under Freddie Scappaticci and that they both colluded together to take him out."


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Plot and lyrical analysis.

In Jamaica and other Caribbean countries, "informer" is the slang term, usually derogatory, for a police informant, who is protected in exchange for critical information used to solve cases. Informers are universally disliked; reggae musicians in particular never fail to mention the punishments awaiting an informer or snitch, who is seen as betraying a trust.

In the song, the narrator is apparently being accused of participating in a homicide near his home, but claims he was somewhere else when it happened and that the police informant who gave his name in is deliberately trying to wreck his life and career goals, disrupting his personal life. Given Snow's record, he probably thought a police informant was behind his arrest and used this single to strike back.

Unfortunately for Snow, the serious implications of the song are at least partially masked by the choppy pace and lilting Jamaican patois he uses. Critics have found the song difficult to evaluate for these reasons and tend to dismiss it as novelty, or worse, attempted commercial swindling.



  • Lyrics for "Informer"
  • Listen to or download "Informer" by Snow

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    Reply with quote  #57 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by oldbill

    THOMAS McGRAW has spent three decades amassing one of Britain's biggest criminal fortunes.

    Little of his ill-gotten wealth remains in any British bank after being ploughed into offshore accounts and property across Europe from Ireland to Poland.

    Like most of the new gangland aristocracy, McGraw's £14million fortune is built on drugs, violence, robbery and extortion.

    Muscular McGraw, 51, usually seen in T-shirt and jeans, pioneered elaborate smuggling routes to bring in vast drugs consignments.

    And he built a maze of bank accounts and front firms to conceal and clean his dirty money.

    His nickname - The Licensee - could have come from his former involvement in the infamous Caravel pub in Glasgow's east end.

    Or it could be, as his enemies claim, because he was a prolific police informer and was given a "licence" to operate in return.

    Tam Bagan, a former associate, also claimed McGraw had "turned" a dirty dozen police officers with information and bribes, sparking the biggest corruption probe the Strathclyde force had ever launched.

    The Caravel, which was run and, on paper at least, owned by McGraw's wife Margaret, was suddenly demolished hours before the arrival of detectives investigating a notorious double murder.

    It was flattened as gangland touts identified the pub as the venue for the infamous double hit on Joe Hanlon and Bobby Glover.

    The Licensee has been quizzed by police investigating some of Scotland's most notorious crimes, including the Ice Cream Wars murder of six members of the Doyle family.

    He once offered to lead customs officers to a kilogramme of heroin and a rocket launcher - in return for £170,000 of confiscated drugs money.

    McGraw promised the consignment of drugs and arms while attempting to retrieve cash taken from criminal cohort John Healy, as he tried to carry it through customs at Heathrow after arriving from a "business" trip to Spain.

    The two later stood trial accused of funding and masterminding one of Scotland's most audacious drugs runs using a youth football team's minibus to bring in huge quantities of cannabis from the Costa del Sol.

    Healy, 45, was jailed for 10 years after becoming one of three men convicted following the 55-day trial. McGraw and seven other accused walked free.

    The trial was a watershed for police and criminals alike. An estimated £10million was spent prosecuting the biggest gangster ever put in a Scots dock.

    And he got off.

    The police evidence, based on analysis of telephone records and months of surveillance, gave the gangsters the best insight into the methods being used by modern crimebusters - and the ways to beat them.

    After the trial, and at regular intervals ever since, McGraw is said to have been ready to flee his fortified bungalow in Mount Vernon, Glasgow, for a home in Tenerife after receiving death threats.

    Against his better judgment, McGraw, who built his reputation in the famous Barlanark Team of robbers, has given one interview and has regretted it ever since.

    In April 1995, he claimed to own nothing, with his homes and property companies all in the name of his wife.

    He said: "Glasgow's a town called malice. Everybody's jealous of everybody else. Nobody likes to see you getting on.

    Eighteen months later, on November 1, 1996, surveillance officers watched McGraw and two henchmen return to one of Healy's pubs in Thornliebank.

     

    There's a gentleman that's going round 
    Turning the joint upside down Stool Pigeon - ha-cha-cha-cha
    He's an old ex-con that's been away Now he's back, no one's safe
    Stool Pigeon - ha-cha-cha-cha
    If you wanna squeal, said the FBI We can make a deal, make it 
    worth your while
    So he told it all and in return
    He got a credit card and a Thunderbird
    And the maximum security
    Even after plastic surgery So go on and squeal, said the FBI
    We can make a deal, make it worth your while
    There's a gentleman that's going round Turning the joint upside 
    downStool Pigeon - ha-cha-cha-cha
    He's an old ex-con that's been awayNow he's back, no one's safe
    Stool Pigeon - ha-cha-cha-cha
    After all the talk then they wired him
    And he took a walk with his crooked friends
    And they joked about the good old days
    And he recorded it on a reel of tape
    He caught the mug who did in the forgery
    And the babe in charge of larceny
    So the FBI they rewarded him Because they like a guy who will 
    stab a friend
    There's a gentleman that's going round Turning the joint upside 
    downStool Pigeon - ha-cha-cha-cha
    He's an old ex-con that's been away Now he's back, no one's safe
    Stool Pigeon - ha-cha-cha-cha
    There's a gentleman that's going round ....If you wanna squeal, 
    said the FBIWe can make a deal, make it worth your while
    So he told it all and in returnHe got a credit card and a 
    Thunderbird He got a spanking new identity
    And a condo down in MiamiHe bought a plane, a boat and 
    jewelry But he couldn't buy any company
    There's a gentleman that's going round ....
    There's a gentleman that's going round ....

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    Reply with quote  #58 

    Quality Max  

    There's a gentleman that's going round Turning the joint upside 
    downStool Pigeon - ha-cha-cha-cha

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    Reply with quote  #59 

    In the song, the narrator is apparently being accused of participating in a homicide near his home, but claims he was somewhere else when it happened and that the police informant who gave his name in is deliberately trying to wreck his life and career goals, disrupting his personal life. Given Snow's record, he probably thought a police informant was behind his arrest and used this single to strike back.

    Unfortunately for Snow, the serious implications of the song are at least partially masked by the choppy pace and lilting Jamaican patois he uses. Critics have found the song difficult to evaluate for these reasons and tend to dismiss it as novelty, or worse, attempted commercial swindling.



  • Lyrics for "Informer"  Listen to or download

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    hammer6

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    Reply with quote  #60 

    'Supergrass' crucial to fertiliser bomb convictions...


    Monday April 30, 2007

    Mohammed Junaid Babar was crucial to the prosecution case in the fertiliser bomb plot trial that ended today.

    He was the first al-Qaida supergrass to give evidence in a British court and provided a wealth of detail about activities at a camp in Pakistan, where members of the fertiliser bomb cell and July 7 bomber Mohammad Sidique Khan received weapons training.

    Babar has immunity from prosecution in Britain after pleading guilty to terrorism offences in a New York federal court. Two of the charges related to the fertiliser bomb plot - he confessed to obtaining ammonium nitrate and aluminium powder for use in bomb-making.

    Babar's family moved to the US from Pakistan when he was two, and he became radicalised after the first Gulf war. The university drop-out came under the influence of the militant preacher Omar Bakri Mohammed in the early 90s, joining a New York branch of Bakri's radical group al-Muhajiroun. Abu Hamza, the Finsbury Park mosque preacher, was also an influence.

    After the September 11 2001 attacks, he believed it was his duty to go to Pakistan and try to aid the Taliban, even though his mother worked in a bank at the World Trade Centre and had narrowly escaped death. Babar told the jury: "I loved my mother but if she was meant to die in the attack then she was meant to die in the attack."

    While in Pakistan, he gave a series of interviews to journalists, including one with Channel Five in which he vowed to kill US troops who entered Afghanistan.

    A few months after September 11, he was introduced to Waheed Mahmood as a contact who could get fighters into Afghanistan. In 2002, Babar travelled to Britain to raise money for jihad in Afghanistan and met some of the fertiliser bomb plotters, including Omar Khyam and Anthony Garcia.

    Describing the meeting with Khyam, at a mosque in Crawley, West Sussex, he said: "He had a long beard. He was wearing a black robe. We just exchanged greetings."

    They went together to talks given by Hamza and militant preacher Abdullah al-Faisal.

    Babar told the Old Bailey that in 2003 he met British militants named Ausman, Abdul Waheed, Abdul Rahman and Khalid, in Pakistan. These were aliases of four of the fertiliser bomb plot defendants; Khyam, Waheed Mahmood, Garcia and Salahuddin Amin. Together, they attended a terrorism training camp and tried to make a fertiliser bomb. They were successful once, creating a "U-shaped" hole in the ground.

    During his evidence, Babar claimed to have conspired in two attempts to kill the Pakistan president, Pervez Musharraf, and said he would be facing the death penalty in Pakistan if he had not agreed to collaborate with the FBI.

    While in Pakistan, he got a job with the Pakistan Software Export Board but never did any work there. He stole five computers from them, three of which he gave to Mahmood. Pakistan Software Export was run by the brother of a man named Sajeel Shahid, who the court heard was a founder member of al-Muhajiroun in Pakistan.

    When Babar returned to New York in March 2004, he was approached in the street by members of the FBI, interviewed him over four days in a hotel. He claimed that he cooperated with them because his wife was still in Pakistan and he knew the authorities were searching for her.

    He appeared before a US judge in June 2004 and pleaded guilty to five charges including "conspiracy to provide material support or resources" to al-Qaida. Defence barristers in the fertiliser bomb trial accused him of being a double agent for the US government. Babar's wife and child have been allowed into the US, and the family will have a new life under assumed identities when he is released from prison.



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