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Four men injured in city shooting...
 
Scene of the shooting at Woodgate
The victims' injuries are not thought to be life-threatening
Two men have been seriously hurt and two others suffered minor injuries during a shooting at a Leicester pub.

Police were called to the Friar Tuck pub in Woodgate after the Ambulance Service reported at least one of the men had received a bullet wound.

It is not yet known whether the incident which took place at 0537 GMT was inside or outside of the premises.

The two men were taken to the Leicester Royal Infirmary with serious but not life-threatening injures.

'Isolated incident'

The other men were taken to hospital suffering minor injuries.

Det Ch Insp Chris Redfern said the investigation was still in its early stages but there was nothing to suggest there would be a repeat of the incident.

"We are treating this as an isolated incident and there is nothing to suggest that the public are at risk.

"The force takes any form of gun crime extremely seriously and we will investigate thoroughly in order to bring those responsible to justice.

"We are talking with potential witnesses but if you have any information that you think may help our investigation and you've not yet spoken with the police please come forward as soon as possible. Even small details could be vitally important," he said.

The area around the pub has been cordoned off while police investigate.

Woodgate has been closed at its junction with Blackbird Road, Abbeygate and Dunton Street and traffic diversions are in place.


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A 22-year-old man is being questioned after a shooting in Leicester in the early hours of Saturday morning.

Two men suffered gunshot wounds to their legs at the Friar Tuck pub in Woodgate while two other men sustained minor stab wounds in the incident.

The victims were taken to the Leicester Royal Infirmary for treatment where they are all "stable".

The man was arrested on suspicion of violent disorder, a Leicestershire Police statement said.

The area around the pub was cordoned off while police carried out an investigation.


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Bradley Tucker
Tucker said he only meant to scare Mr Woodhams

 
 
 

A teenager has been found guilty of murdering a man outside his home in front of his young family.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/london/6483491.stm



 


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Cant believe the police didnt act on this one quicker i was watching it on the news tonight

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Youngsters on an estate


 

Criminal gangs have been around for centuries but police believe they have become more organised in recent years. So how do they operate?

Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Ian Blair has said gang culture could cause serious problems for society if it is left untreated.

Speaking at the monthly meeting of the Metropolitan Police Authority (MPA) Sir Ian described the situation as a "cloud on the horizon".

His comments follow a series of fatal shootings and stabbings of teenagers in London during the past two months.

Scotland Yard have identified 169 gangs with about 5,000 members in London.

Sir Ian warned against adding to the "allure" of gang culture by overstating its importance.

My fear is that there is a generation who almost believe that to be a victim of crime is a rite of passage
Richard Barnes, Conservative London Assembly member

"It is a cloud towards the horizon that is coming," he said. "Unless we do something about it, it will get very difficult."

He said most of the victims of gang violence knew their perpetrators, but many feared the consequences of speaking out and therefore were reluctant to go to the police .

"What we have to find is a way of encouraging these young people to trust the authorities to protect them," Sir Ian said.

He said that recent high profile cases did have an impact on how children viewed "their own safety".

Teenage stabbings

Richard Barnes, a Conservative London Assembly member, added to Sir Ian's comments at the meeting.

He said: "My fear is that there is a generation who almost believe that to be a victim of crime is a rite of passage."

Cindy Butts, a member of the Home Secretary's gun crime round table, added: "The way young people see it, it is safer and easier to be in (a gang) than to be out."

Recent teenage victims in London include Kodjo Yenga and Adam Regis who were stabbed to death.

Three other young men, James Andre Smartt Ford, Michael Dosunmu and Billy Cox, were all shot dead in February.


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PAUL Ferris is some kind of moralist. Since deciding one day in 1997, during his last and longest stretch in prison, that his criminal career was untenable, he has published three popular works of non-fiction and one novel, and the gist of them seems to be this: having the law on his side does not make a man good, nor a headline make him evil in the tabloid sense of the word. The new book, Villains, is a collection of anecdotes from Ferris's former life as what he calls a "street player", and stories he has been told by older voices from the underworld.

"It's about people I've met, " says Ferris this morning over one long coffee in Glasgow's west end, the polar opposite side of town to where he comes from. "Individuals who have influenced me, or filled gaps in my history. I never knew what my dad was up to, for example, how much he was respected . . . " He goes on, without pause, to discuss his father Willie's gang The Ross Street San Toi, showing me an old photograph of the members scanned onto his mobile phone. He namechecks The Shark, a long-retired "player" who is honoured in the book, one chapter of which describes him ripping half a man's face off. He raises the subject of Arthur Thompson, who employed Ferris as a debt collector through the 1980s, but who allegedly gave him up to the police, after which Thompson's son "Fat Boy" was shot to death, a crime of which Ferris was accused, then acquitted, in one of Scotland's most sensational murder trials.

"My dad told me, 'Don't work with Thompson, are you off your f***in' head, the man's a grass.' But I thought I knew better. In one ear, out the other." Which brings him to his own eldest son, who is 21 and not a player, but makes Ferris feel like a hypocrite when telling him to stay out of trouble.

And then, in finally answering my question, which was a straightforward opening ice-breaker about how his books are co- authored with crime writer Reg McKay (in what Ferris describes as a "phenomenal feat", their first, The Ferris Conspiracy, was assembled in the late 1990s out of clandestine letters and phonecalls while he served his sentence for gun-running in Durham's Frankland Prison) he also puts forward one argument for the social value of this work.

"Keeping it real is our mantra, " he says. "We put things in these books that will horrify Mr and Mrs Joe Public. But if you skim the truth to make it more palatable then you are denying that truth. I write most of the material up and fire it off to Reg, then he puts his part on it, and it creates a life of its own. The last book, Vendetta [written after his release, and documenting the forces, on both sides of the law, ranged against his "going straight"], turned out to be an anti-crime book, which we never set out to do, but we never set out to glorify crime either.

"And I've since got a lot of feedback from fathers who have given the book to their sons, as a medium for saying, 'Here, if you think a life of crime is glamorous, read this'. That's cool. Really cool." From the moment he walked into the cafe, casually dressed, and having first phoned to check I was "on location" (there is still, supposedly, a contract out on his life, which makes him cautious but not actively worried), Ferris has talked and talked with a conviviality that causes me to think several things at once. First, that the actor Robert Carlyle was right when he described Ferris as "very personable", after they met to discuss the possibility of a film about him. That meeting is addressed in one chapter of Villains. In another, Ferris observes that "sometimes the smallest, most innocuous, fresh-faced man is the most vicious fighter . . . appearances mean f*** all on the street".

This must be true, because even scarred from mouth to jawline, Ferris actually looks as genial as he sounds. While he's speaking, at least, his eyes do not project danger. It strikes me as especially disarming that a man whose ethos is based on a "code of the street", which is effectively a code of silence, should turn out to be so locquacious. But I can't work out whether this is natural Glasgow patter, or a calculated play on my reluctance to interrupt him. Ferris apologises more than once for "rambling", but he also mistakes my initial timidity for professionalism. "The reason you're letting me talk, " he says complicitly, nodding at the dictaphone on the table, "is they're not wanting to hear your voice on that tape, they're wanting to hear mine." Ferris knows a lot about recording devices.

Today he tells unprompted stories about tapes made by himself and his friends, purporting to have captured corrupt cops in the process of setting Ferris up for firearms charges, and admitting to plotting his murder on Rothesay. He mentions "biometric voice recognition tests" pioneered by Nasa engineers, which supposedly verified this evidence but were never fully taken into legal or public account. Fascinating as this stuff is, it suggests that Ferris is using this conversation as a platform for one particular
viewpoint.
 
http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4156/is_20061022/ai_n16802598

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Who killed LA dealer in knife frenzy?



Briton Neil Revill has spent six years awaiting trial for a brutal double murder, despite evidence linking the crime to drug gangs. As a petition goes to the Prime Minister, he explains why he believes he can still win his case.

Sunday April 1, 2007



Even for Los Angeles, a city inured to violence, the double slaying of drug dealer Arthur Davodian and his girlfriend Kimberley Crayton was exceptional in its brutality.

It seemed evident to the detectives who surveyed his apartment in the northern LA hills that Davodian, 22, was murdered first - stabbed 17 times in the body - before his head was severed with a butcher's precision and removed. It was found ten days later, wrapped in a carrier bag in the front yard of a Masonic lodge, by a schoolboy who was puzzled by its overpowering smell. Crayton, 21 - who suffered terrible wounds on her hands and arms - had locked herself in their bedroom while her lover died. But the killer or killers smashed down the door and dispatched her with equal ferocity. Only her baby Kaylee, aged 14 months, survived.

This summer, nearly six years after his arrest, Neil Revill, a semi-blind dyslexic from Consett in Co Durham, will face a jury in the downtown LA courthouse which once hosted the trial of O.J. Simpson. He is accused of both murders and the prosecutors are seeking the death penalty. His face pasty and drawn, Revill, 33, sat in a white breeze-block room in the North Los Angeles County maximum security jail last week and gave an exclusive interview to The Observer, conducted via a video link. 'All these years I've kept thinking that something was about to happen: that there would be some new piece of evidence that would make them drop the charges and set me free,' he said. 'Maybe that's a delusion.'

Revill, who has no previous convictions and has always protested his innocence, spoke in the tones of middle England, his voice betraying few signs of his years in America or of his origins in the north east of England. His emotions surfaced visibly only once, when he described the effect of his being charged with a capital murder on his relationship with his mother, Brenda, and his father, Graham, a retired RAF mechanic. 'One good thing has come of this,' he said. 'We've become a lot closer. They visit whenever they can and they're going to be here for the trial, though it's expected to last four months. We were never a very close family. Now we are.'

This week Clive Stafford Smith, the director of the London-based human rights group, Reprieve, will write to Tony Blair, asking him to support a new petition by attorneys from the LA Public Defender office asking the prosecutors to drop their insistence on the death penalty. They will point out that the case against Revill is circumstantial and far from conclusive. There were no eyewitnesses, nor a confession, no murder weapon has been recovered, and while there were samples of Revill's DNA at the crime scene he has always said that Davodian was a friend, and that he went to his apartment as an invited guest on the night before the killings.

Meanwhile, evidence has emerged that Davodian was a police informant, whose information led to the arrest of powerful figures in the Armenian and Israeli mafias - gangs whose signature punishment for snitches is decapitation.

Neil Revill and his alleged victim Kimberley Crayton shared an unfortunate characteristic. Both had been lured from secure, law-abiding backgrounds to the deeper reaches of the LA drug scene, seduced by its illusory glamour. Neither really belonged. Crayton, a niece of the jazz singer Al Jarreau, was brought up amid the sunny affluence of Orange County, south of LA. Having married her high-school sweetheart and given birth to his child, she abruptly changed direction, abandoning her husband to use substantial quantities of crack cocaine and the still more powerful crystal methamphetamine. When she died, she had been living with Davodian for only a month - the last of several brief relationships that revolved around drugs.

Revill's trajectory was longer and less direct. He spent several years in Germany, where his father was based: later, when he turned 18 and his father was posted to Cyprus, he elected to stay with his grandfather, a retired miner, in Consett. His dyslexia meant that his only GCSE was in metalwork, while his blindness from birth in his right eye deprived him of fulfilling his dream of following his father into the RAF. For 18 months he lived with a woman in Sunderland, working in kitchen and bathroom sales. Finally, he said, in the summer of 1996 and at the age of 23: 'I began to get bored and kind of upped sticks. I bought a ticket to Amsterdam and hitch-hiked to Munich.' He stayed at a hostel, securing free board and lodging in return for a little work. Already in residence was a woman he would shortly marry, a slim American law student on vacation.

Revill's ex-wife, now a partner in an international LA law firm, agreed to talk to The Observer on condition of anonymity. 'I still care a lot about him, and I guess I always will,' she said. 'Even when we separated, I made sure we stayed friends. He was always a good guy. I can't believe he is capable of these murders, physically or psychologically. He was always so gentle. He watched out for me. And Neil is a little clumsy. He just doesn't have the kind of precision you'd need with a knife to be able to sever a man's head.' Davodian, meanwhile, was a muscley, tattooed strongman. At the time of the murders, Neil, who is six foot three, weighed only 11 stone. 'Quite frankly,' his former wife said, 'if he had attacked Davodian, it should have been Neil who ended up on the slab.'

If ever a marriage were made from opposites, this was it. While his driven, focused partner completed her studies at law school, Revill made money as a rock concert roadie and as a guinea pig for drug trials. Over the following year he made several trips to visit her in America and eventually asked her to marry him. She said yes. Her parents laid on a grand wedding at their home in Athens, Georgia in November 1997. Revill and his wife lived there too for more than a year. In December 1998, the couple moved to LA - where their relationship started to fall apart.

From the beginning, Revill and his wife dabbled in the club and drug scene. 'We were just experimenting. No one we knew was really hardcore back then,' she said. 'It was very rare we'd ever do drugs outside the weekend. But it was a big underground scene; a lot of new places were opening up. We had a lot of fun.' The problem was that 'if you know what you're doing, LA is a little playground. But if you don't, you can easily get lost. That's what happened to Neil'.

While she hunted for the perfect attorney's job, he worked in a delicatessen and later sold mobile phones. When his wife began an affair, they split up in the spring of 1999, only to be reconciled before Christmas. But 'the spark and the trust had gone,' Revill said, and they separated for good the following May. For a while he did well on his own: promoted to phone store manager, he got his own apartment, a car and a high credit rating. Two months later the US Immigration Service started asking questions about the status of his marriage, and whether he was still entitled to work. 'That was when my world crumbled,' Revill said. 'I lost my job and I had a broken heart. I went on a party rampage. I took out four new credit cards, borrowed on them to the limit and blew the lot on drugs. I was already using ecstasy and speed and had tried crystal meth in small quantities. I started going on four-day binges, immersing myself in the club scene. When the money ran out, the only thing I thought I could do was to start to sell drugs.'

Before long, Revill was friends with Davodian, who lived in a yellow concrete condominium at 10149 Commerce Avenue in Tujunga, a scruffy, working-class neighbourhood beset by gangs. Four months before the murders, Revill was arrested, driving some of Davodian's drugs to a dealer who lived across town in Glendale. He was bailed and told to expect a sentence of six months. 'I thought, OK, I'll do my time, get deported, and then the party's going to be over: it's time to move on and grow up,' said Revill. 'What worried me most was how to tell my parents.'

Davodian and Crayton were murdered in the early afternoon of 11 October, 2001. Revill was arrested on 22 November - the fourth anniversary of his wedding.

In his 20 years as an LA public defender, Doug Goldstein, Revill's lead lawyer, has never known a case like Revill's. 'Usually death penalty trials are about mitigation, trying to get them life,' he said. 'The evidence of guilt is pretty clear-cut: there'll be eyewitnesses, a confession, DNA and fingerprints. This is different. It's like a Chandler mystery. And I've never had a client like Neil, either. He's pleasant, polite and articulate; the kind of guy you'd invite home to dinner. He's goofy, kind of humble. It's very hard to imagine he did something like this.'

The extraordinary delay in bringing the case to trial has arisen because new evidence has regularly been discovered suggesting that someone else - probably at least two people - killed Crayton and Davodian. Each new disclosure has required further investigations by both prosecution and defence while the scientific evidence - which turns on the exact interpretation of DNA from the crime scene - is extremely complex. There was blood in Davodian's flat from at least two unknown males.

And long after Revill was charged, documents emerged that showed Davodian had made dangerous enemies. Four months before his murder, he had been busted but made a deal with prosecutors known as 'snitch three, go free,' which meant that, if he gave information that led to three successful prosecutions, he would avoid going to prison. One of the three was Revill. There was also at least one much bigger fish - Andre Bolandi, a leader of a gang called Armenian Power, and Davodian's main supplier. Thanks to his information, Bolandi is now serving a long sentence. Other witnesses interviewed by police have said that Davodian snitched on drug kingpins still further up the supply chain, including a leading figure in LA's Israeli mafia.

Davodian's neighbours have cast further doubt on whether Revill is the murderer. One, who lived in the house opposite, says he heard men shouting at Davodian a day or two before the murders, including a threat to cut off his head. Michael Gregorian, who discovered the bodies, says he saw two Armenians wearing uniforms from a carpet-cleaning firm leaving the building a short while earlier. No carpet cleaners had been working there officially at the time. Finally, the man who lived and worked in the flat below the room where Davodian was killed says he saw two men entering the condo and heard sounds of a struggle.

Revill said that, as the trial approaches, he is starting to feel nervous. 'All these years I feel like I've shut myself down. I've dealt with this by taking it day by day; I measure my life by the passage of each eight-hour guard shift. When I first got here, it was an enormous culture shock. Shutting myself down was the only way I could cope, especially with so many delays. But I'm still optimistic.' Revill might be home by Christmas. 'But I'm not a fool. I know I could lose and be sent to death row. And if I do, I understand what might happen.'


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A 22-year-old man has been shot while sitting in his car at a set of traffic lights in Greater Manchester.

The shooting took place near the Late Shop on Fog Lane in Burnage, between Kingsway and Parrswood Road.

Police said the man, who is from Withington, was shot in his shoulder by the occupant of another car that had pulled up nearby on Saturday night.

The victim made his own way to hospital. Police have said his injuries are not life threatening.

They are appealing for witnesses to the incident to contact them.


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The Midland Tavern, Nechells 


One person is critically ill in hospital and two others are wounded after a shooting at a Birmingham pub.

The incident happened in the Midland Tavern, in Erskine Street, Nechells, shortly after midnight.

The victims were taken to hospital for treatment. The street has been cordoned off while forensic science experts search the area.

It is the latest shooting in the north of the city, which has seen an increase in gun crime in recent years.

Last December, 53-year-old Henry Wilson was shot dead at his home in Handsworth, while a month earlier shopkeeper Mohammed Busharat was shot in Lozells.

Weeks earlier 20-year-old Meshack Bernard-Brown had been killed in nearby Newtown.

Anyone with information about the shooting is asked to contact West Midlands Police.

A police spokesman said: "The pub was busy and contained a large number of people so officers are appealing to anyone who left the pub at the time of this incident or who was in the nearby area."


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A 32-year-old man is recovering after being shot in Greater Manchester.

Police were called to Eagle Court, Bold Street, Old Trafford, following reports that a man had been shot in the knee at about midnight.

The man, who has not been named, was taken to hospital for treatment, but his injury is not believed to be life-threatening.

Police have stepped up patrols in the area and said they are keeping an open mind as to the motive of the shooting.


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A teenager has been killed and another is critically injured following a knife attack in north-east London.

Paul Erhahon, 14, from Leytonstone, was stabbed to death and a 15-year-old boy injured in what is thought be an attack involving a gang of youths.

Officers found the boys after being called to Crownfield Road, Leytonstone, shortly before 2000 BST.

A 13-year-old boy and a man, aged 19, were later arrested over the attack and are to be questioned by police.

Officers have not named the other teenager who was injured but said the victims, who were black, were friends and Paul Erhahon lived in Buttermere Close in Leytonstone, close to where the stabbing took place.

Map of the crime scene
Det Ch Insp Matthew Horne said: "We understand a large group of youths were involved in an incident in the foyer of Gean Court, a block of flats in Langthorne Road E11, during which we believe the two victims were stabbed.

"It is believed they then managed to stagger the short distance to nearby Crownfield Road.

"A number of youths were seen running from the scene.

"We are appealing for anyone who was present during the incident to come forward, along with any witnesses or anyone with information on this appalling crime."

Police said they are remaining open-minded regarding the motive and circumstances of the attack.

A friend of Paul's, who did not want to be named, said the boy was also known as MC Hellrazor and was keen on jungle and garage music.

He said Paul attended Kingsford Community School, the same school as 17-year-old Adam Regis, who was stabbed in Plaistow, east London, last month.

LONDON'S TEENAGE VICTIMS
A wall of tributes to Kodjo Yenga
James Andre Smartt-Ford, 16, shot in Streatham, 3 February
Michael Dosunmu, 15, shot in Peckham, 6 February
Billy Cox, 15, shot in Clapham, 14 February
Kodjo Yenga, 16, stabbed in Hammersmith, 14 March
Adam Regis, 15, stabbed in Plaistow, 17 March

The 17-year-old also said Paul was part of a group of youngsters who lived in the area, called "the youngers", but stressed that it was not a gang.

"I can't explain how I feel," he said. "He was a good lad. He was healthy, he did not smoke, didn't drink."

Another friend, who gave his name only as Mich, has written about his grief on the website gonetoosoon.co.uk.

He wrote: "Just thought I'd write you a message to let you know how much you are missed.

"Hope you're OK up there and being looked after.

"I know nobody's life will be the same without you."

Local resident Richard Lamb, 36, told how he saw "a load of hoodies" shortly before hearing sirens.

He said he saw the group walking and "soon after the police turned up".

He said the area was "getting worse without a doubt."

A large area surrounding the estate has been cordoned off by police and several officers are guarding the scene.

The latest attack follows the killing of five other young males in London in the past two months.


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9 April 2007
MURDER BID RAPS

Four men aged between 19 and 21 are to appear in court today accused of attempted murder. It follows the stabbing of a 21-year-old man in Rosehaugh Road, Inverness, early on Saturday.


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James Stevenson and Gerry Carbin
The pair were caught following a surveillance operation.

One of Scotland's major gangland figures has been jailed for more than 12 years for his part in a massive money laundering operation.

James Stevenson, 41, also known as "The Iceman", used cash from drugs to buy luxury watches and set up a taxi firm.

His stepson, Gerry Carbin, 26, has been jailed for five years and six months for his part in the scheme.

Stevenson's sentence was believed to be the longest ever imposed in Scotland for money laundering.

At the High Court in Glasgow last month, Stevenson and Carbin admitted a series of charges relating to concealing and receiving criminal property.

Surveillance operation

In jailing Stevenson, judge Lord Hodge described him as a major figure in the world of serious crime.

The pair were caught after a massive police surveillance operation.

Officers from the Scottish Crime and Drug Enforcement Agency used listening devices and hidden microphones to listen in to conversations in the men's homes.

Over a period of several months, investigators were able to use the information they heard to trace bags of cash with nearly £600,000 inside, 55 luxury watches worth £307,000 as well as an attempt to set up the taxi firm.

It's clear that your illegal activities were developing over time
Lord Hodge

Lord Hodge said: "It's clear that you occupy an important position in the world of organised crime, money laundering provides an essential service to the drugs trade and contributes materially to its profitability."

Lord Hodge jailed Stevenson for a total of nine years and nine months for hiding £204,510 in cash, receiving £389,035 in cash, using criminal proceeds to buy the 55 watches and having a further £5,000 of criminal proceeds.

The judge also gave him an extra three years for receiving criminal property worth £98,605 and using it to buy 10 Skoda Octavia cars.

Stevenson, from Fishescoates Avenue, Burnside, was charged with killing former friend Tony McGovern, the leader of an infamous Glasgow crime clan seven years ago.

McGovern, 35, who was best man at Stevenson's wedding, was shot dead outside a pub in Springburn in 2000.

Some of the watches recovered by police. Pic from SDEA
he pair used some of the money to buy luxury watches

However, the charges against Stevenson, who had been the main suspect, were later dropped by prosecutors.

Carbin, of Campsie Road, East Kilbride, was described by the judge as one of Stevenson's "senior associates" who had a "significant role" in the money laundering group.

He was jailed for his part in laundering cash through the purchase of the luxury watches.

Lord Hodge also gave him five years for receiving £204,510 and 15 months for having criminal proceeds of £7,820 cash, with both of these sentences running concurrently.

Carbin lived with his partner and two young children in a house bought by Stevenson for £280,000.

Lord Hodge told Stevenson that his criminal activities were "developing and expanding".

'Criminal hierarchy'

"It's clear that your illegal activities were developing over time," he said.

"You had also two large sums of money which were the proceeds of crime.

"This also confirms your position at a very high level in the criminal hierarchy.

"The charges to which you have pleaded guilty represent a high level of criminal activity."

Housing complex in Amsterdam. Pic from SDEA
Stevenson owned a flat in a luxury housing complex in Amsterdam

Lord Hodge congratulated the police for catching Stevenson and Carbin during Operation Folklore.

He said: "It is a significant success for the police force. All too frequently only the small players are punished."

Last week the court heard details of the gangsters' operations to hide and process the money.

In January last year police listened in as a man arrived at Carbin's home.

He left a bag that was referred to as "204".

Officers raided the house the next day and found a bag with £204,510 cash inside as well as bundles of banknotes elsewhere in the property.

On another occasion officers listened in as Stevenson described how a taxi firm he was setting up would operate.

The gangster told his wife that a certain amount of money would be coming into the business each month.

During other surveillance last year police discovered that Stevenson and Carbin had bought a number of luxury watches for cash including a Rolex Daytona worth £10,340.

Using the information, officers managed to trace 55 watches that had been bought over a three-year period worth a total of £307,087.

The court heard that Stevenson considered himself to be a car valeter and a jewellery trader for tax purposes.


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