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Release date:
Wednesday, January 18, 2012
Running time:
102 minutes
Director:
Ray Burdis
Cast:
Martin Compston
Contact address

Organic Marketing (Part of TargetMCG)
45-51 Whitfield St.
London W1T 4HD
0203 372 0970




http://www.organic-marketing.co.uk/press/wee-man


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New Trailer & Poster for The Wee Man with Martin Compston and John Hannah

The gangster film is one of the genres we tend to do better than anyone else here in the UK, and The Wee Man is shaping up to be a very promising entry into that genre.

Hitting UK cinemas in just over a month’s time, the film sees Martin Compston (The Disappearance of Alice Creed) star in the lead, based on the true story of reformed Glaswegian gangster, Paul Ferris. And with just a few weeks left to wait, we’ve had an impressive new trailer and poster sent our way to share with you.

“The story begins in the sixties. At the age of just eleven, Paul has already learned that life on the street is tough. Everybody knows his place. Poverty breeds corruption, crime, violence and bullying. Blackhill was the most notorious area of all.

The film charts the way in which Paul was bullied as a child, and whose road to crime came as a reaction against the monsters of his youth. Paul worked for feared gangland boss Arthur Thompson Snr (Patrick Bergin) and rose to power in Glasgow’s murky underworld in the late 80s and early 90s. In 1991 he was charged with the murder of Arthur ‘Fat Boy’ Thompson Jr (Stephen McCole), son of Arthur. Ferris sparked a furore when he was given a hero’s reception outside the High Court and walked free after a not-proven verdict, following one of Scotland’s longest murder trials. He was jailed for gun-running in 1998, and on his release in 2002 turned his back on his former gangster life and vowed to go straight, determined to teach others how to avoid a life of crime.”

John Hannah (Four Weddings and a Funeral) leads a fine supporting cast, with Compston and Hannah starring alongside Denis Lawson (Perfect Sense), Lorna McMonagle (Lip Service), Clare Grogan (Gregory’s Girl), Stephen McCole (Neds), and Patrick Bergin (Patriot Games).

Ray Burdis (Love, Honour and Obey) is behind the camera, directing from his own script.

The Wee Man will be released in selected UK cinemas on 18th January, 2013, and looks like it should be a fine start to the New Year from the British film industry. For now, here’s the new trailer and poster.


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The Wee Man, as the title suggests, is a Scottish film which carries a great Scottish cast, filmed in Scotland and based on a Scottish story, and for that I have to feature it prominently on the site. The bonus is that the cast looks very strong, the story powerful and interesting, and the trailer plays really well.

The film is about a young man who enters the criminal underworld in Glasgow and is based on the true story of Paul Ferris.

The leading man of The Wee Man is Martin Compston and there are some other recognisable faces in there including John Hannah, Patrick Bergin, Clare Grogan and Denis Lawson. It's written and directed by Ray Burdis who co-wrote and co-directed the films Final Cut and Love, Honour and Obey which featured a number of big British actors.

Here's a blurb for the film:

Brought up in the notorious Black Hill area of Glasgow, Ferris is the son of hardworking parents but soon ascends the rungs of power within the city's criminal underworld. The film dramatizes Ferris' conflicts with both the police and rival gangsters, including arch-enemy Tam "The Licensee" McGraw.

Now the trailer for The Wee Man looks rather strong, in fact I'd go so far as to say I'd be looking for it on release when it arrives for a limited UK release on the 18th of January next year. The trailer comes through TrailerAddict:


http://www.filmstalker.co.uk/archives/2012/12/the_wee_man_trailer_hits_hard.html


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When Paul Ferris met Fat Boy
Face to face ... Paul Ferris and McCole, who plays Fat Boy
Sophie Mutevelian
 
 

HARDMAN Paul Ferris looks like he’s seen a ghost as he bumps into a rival he was once accused of murdering.

But old enemy Arthur Thompson Jnr was in fact actor Stephen McCole — who plays the hood known as Fat Boy in Ferris movie life story The Wee Man.

The picture was taken as former gangland enforcer Ferris met cast and crew from the eagerly awaited film which opens next month. http://www.filmstalker.co.uk/archives/2012/12/the_wee_man_trailer_hits_hard.html

Last night, a source said: “Seeing those two face to face was a heart-stopping moment.

Flashback ... Ferris as young hood

 

“It was great when Ferris arrived but surreal to see him talking to Stephen.”

Ferris was invited on to the set by producers of the flick, which charts his rise to power.

Thompson Jnr, whose killing is portrayed in the movie, was gunned down by a hitman in 1991. Ferris was cleared by a jury after trial the next year.


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will you be able to pre-order this on dvd
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http://www.cineworld.co.uk/whatson/5858
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Reply with quote  #83 
10 days and counting.Good luck to you and yours at the film premiere paul.Have a great night.
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Why won’t cops let us shoot Ferris?

Hardman ... but Ferris says he has turned his back on guns and crime
 
 

FILM-makers are fuming that Scots police are refusing to let them make a movie about Paul Ferris — amid claims cops are just settling an old score with the ex-gangster.

Producers had hoped to shoot scenes in Ferris’s Glasgow stomping ground for multi-million-pound flick The Wee Man.

But they’ve now been forced to move filming of the hard-hitting tale to London after Strathclyde Police refused to give them permission.

Big shot ... Ferris with Compston

Last night a movie source said it’s cost the Scots economy a fortune.

 

They said: “It’s felt the police were settling some old scores with Paul by not letting us make The Wee Man.

“The police were sent a script — it probably made uncomfortable reading. There are scenes where cops use excessive violence and concoct evidence.

“But the film would have generated millions for the economy. A movie of this size carries a seven-figure budget.

“The vast majority of that is spent on accommodation, food, transport, props, extras, camera crew, lighting and electricians. The film would also have brought tourists to Glasgow.”

Life story ... book

Now the crew are now having to recreate Glasgow’s mean streets in a London studio.

 

The source added: “It is a travesty we have to do this.

“Glasgow is well known — and well loved — for its culture as well as it underworld. Why try to hide the city’s history?

“When they knocked us back, everyone was just shocked.”

The Wee Man is based on the reformed hood’s biography The Ferris Conspiracy.

It stars Sweet Sixteen actor Martin Compston, 27, as a young Ferris rising to power in Glasgow’s underworld and his bust-ups with gangland rivals and feuds with the police.

Ferris sparked a furore when given a hero’s reception outside the High Court in Glasgow in June 1992 after being cleared of murdering Arthur “Fat Boy” Thompson, son of Godfather Arthur Snr. In 1998, he was jailed when guns were discovered in his car.

But on his release in 2002, he vowed to put crime behind him. The 46-year-old is now living in Ayrshire with wife Carolyn — who is a policeman’s daughter — and their kids.

Released ... Ferris outside court after being cleared of murder

London-based film company Carnaby International would’ve needed police permission to film scenes for The Wee Man on public roads.

Producer Michael Loveday had fired off a letter to Strathclyde Chief Constable Stephen House asking for help with road closures and crowd control.

But Chief Constable House replied: “After careful consideration of the subject matter, I must inform you that I do not feel it is appropriate for Strathclyde Police to assist in facilitating this production.”

Loveday and director Ray Burdis — who was the driving force behind The Krays movie — were unavailable for comment last night.

But a spokesman for the movie said: “It became very clear that senior officers did not welcome our presence — and were not going to co-operate with the production. As a result, and with some regret, we felt forced to relocate filming to London.”

A spokeswoman for Strathclyde Police confirmed they turned down the movie-makes’ pleas.

But she added: “The suggestion that it was declined to settle an old score with Paul Ferris is ridiculous.”

irinnelson@the-sun.co.uk



Read more: http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/scottishnews/3915790/.html#ixzz2HTtrVqEB

 



 

    

 

 

 

 


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The making of ‘The Wee Man’ Paul Ferris story

Martin Compston plays Glasgow gangster Paul Ferris in The Wee Man

TO SAY Ray Burdis has an axe to grind is putting it mildly.

 

It is more than a year since the veteran actor and film-maker first had a run-in with the powers-that-be in Glasgow. But as he prepares to unveil his hard-hitting feature on the life and times of Paul Ferris he is still spoiling for a 
dust-up with Strathclyde Police and Glasgow City Council.

Burdis, who produced The Krays, was not exactly expecting the red carpet treatment when he started making a film about one of the city’s most notorious gangland figures. But the film’s director says he was dumbfounded after being forced to relocate virtually the entire shoot to London, having being “effectively banned” from the city owing to the nature of the The Wee Man, which portrays Ferris’s descent into violence after being targeted by a gang of bullying brothers when he was just 11.

Burdis has compared Glasgow to “Nazi Germany” after he was asked by the police to submit to them a script for The Wee Man, the film he also wrote based on Ferris’s best-selling autobiography. The bloody gangster film is now about to get a gala premiere in the city, which provides its backdrop.

With its all-star cast and uncomfortable subject matter, The Wee Man promises to be Glasgow’s equivalent of Trainspotting, which had the city fathers in the capital squirming on its release in 1996. For example, the Glasgow City Marketing Bureau, responsible for promoting the city to the world, provided a terse “no comment” when asked for its views ahead of The Wee Man’s release.

There was a similar reluctance from the council’s leader, Gordon Matheson, to be drawn on the film, despite the city’s leading politician last year boasting that shooting on major productions such as World War Z and Cloud Atlas helped generate more than £20 million for the economy in 2011.

The council said Glasgow Film Office had diverted inquiries to Strathclyde Police. The force says it did not try to ban the film but said it had turned down requests for assistance and advice from production company Carnaby because it was deemed “inappropriate”. With the film’s stabbings, shootings, car bombings and police corruption, it is perhaps unsurprising there was a lack of enthusiasm to get involved in such a project.

The full official trailer gives a flavour of what cinemagoers can expect when the film hits Scotland’s cinemas at the end of next week.

One early review of The Wee Man described the portrayal of Ferris and his violent struggle for power in 1980s Glasgow leaving a “nasty taste in the mouth” and said it was “arguably irresponsible.” Another critic warned the film features “repellent bursts of bloodletting”.

Martin Compston, the highly rated young actor, who says the chance to play Ferris was too good to turn down, already seems braced for the backlash.He told his Twitter followers last week: “2weeks today and the wait is over let the abuse from the powers that b commence!”

Burdis will be joined by Ferris, Compston, and co-stars John Hannah, Stephen McCole and Laura McMonagle for the film’s premiere on Tuesday, the day before the Glasgow Film Festival – an event backed by both the council and the Glasgow City Marketing Bureau – launches its programme for 2013.

Burdis, who made his screen debut in Ala Clarke’s Borstal drama Scum in 1979, says the experience of trying to film in Glasgow was the worst he had encountered in more than 40 years: “We were basically told by the council and the police that we were not welcome and would be offered no help at all to make the film.

“When you are making a film you need an awful lot of help, particularly if you’re going to close off roads for filming, like we needed to. We were basically told that they couldn’t guarantee our safety. I couldn’t believe that they were so obstructive to be honest.

“We had done so much preparatory work before we were about to start, we had done the casting and the location hunting, and had even booked studio time. We got a letter from the police saying we weren’t welcome to shoot in Glasgow because of the subject matter. The police also wanted to see a copy of the script, which I’d never come across in more than 40 years in the business. The whole thing was like something out of Nazi Germany.

“I couldn’t believe it, the whole thing shook me to the core. Paul is a reformed character these days but the film was also based on events that actually happened in Glasgow.

“They were historical events and most of the events in the film are factual. I tried to be as sensitive as possible to the families of the murder victims, and some elements of the story were changed, but Paul actually insisted on changing a couple of things to make it more accurate to what happened.”

Burdis and the crew ended up shooting the bulk of The Wee Man in the East End of London, with only a handful of days filming in Glasgow to secure mainly skyline shots of the city.

He added: “The way the police and the council handled this actually cost the city of Glasgow money when we had to uproot the whole production. We are talking several million pounds. We had to find parts of the East End of London that looked like Glasgow in the late 1970s and 80s at very short notice.”

Burdis was approached directly by Ferris to get the film off the ground after discussions with Robert Carlyle came to nothing. At that point all he had to work from was Ferris’s book: “I found it capitvating. It’s a riveting tale, full of integrity that pulls no punches: it wasn’t glamourising the fact that Paul was a gangster, but telling us the story about why that happened to him, and I found that so moving.

“It was not so much the gangster part of it that appealed to me. It was such a strong story about a young boy growing up in Glasgow, about being relentlessly bullied as a youngster and then seeking retribution. It was much more interesting than a straight shoot-em-up.”

The Wee Man depicts Ferris’s rise through the city’s murky underworld, his relationship with Glasgow godfather Arthur Thompson and his rivalry with his son, Arthur “Fat Boy” Thompson Jr. Ferris famously walked free from court after being cleared of the latter’s murder, after what was then Scotland’s longest-running criminal trial. Ferris was later convicted of gun-running but now says he has put crime behind him.

Ferris, who spent several days on set, says: “The objections (from the police) came as no surprise to be honest. There are elements of police corruption throughout the film and they had to be included. The police don’t come out of the film smelling of roses, but then again neither do I. Ray has captured 99.9 per cent of the real life. It’s a film that doesn’t glorify crime or gangsters. A lot of people are going to be surprised when they realise how anti-crime this film is.”

Compston, who shot to fame after being plucked from the streets of his native Greenock by Ken Loach for Sweet Sixteen in 2002, says Ferris had come to be seen as a “bogeyman” in the West of Scotland, but says he also knows his life story “inside out,” adding: “If you’re a Scottish actor and you’re not going to be William Wallace, you might as well be Paul Ferris.”


http://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/film/the-making-of-the-wee-man-paul-ferris-story-1-2725125


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The Wee Man gets a sneak preview

 

RAMMY ... Paul Ferris comes into contact with
the long arm of the law

 

 
 
 
 

IT’S the film all Scotland is talking about — now The Scottish Sun has a sneak preview of The Wee Man.

The controversial biopic on the life of former Glasgow underworld figure Paul Ferris hits cinemas next Friday.

Martin Compston stars as Ferris, and our exclusive clips sees the chilling moment the young thug agrees to work for Glasgow crime lord Arthur Thompson Snr — changing his life forever.

The gritty slash-fest is set to be the most talked about Scottish movie of the year after cops banned film-makers from shooting scenes in Glasgow.

Our taster shows Ferris being summoned to meet the late Glasgow Godfather Arthur Thompson Snr, played by Irish actor Patrick Bergin.

 

 

MARTIN Compston stars in biopic on the life of former Glasgow underworld figure Paul Ferris

 

 

Scar-faced Ferris’ decision to work for the crime king pin as his enforcer ended in tears when he was accused of murdering Thompson’s son Arthur ‘Fatboy’ Thompson Jnr.

He walked free on a shock ‘not proven’ verdict in 1992 but was later jailed in 1999 when guns were found in his car.

The Wee Man — which also stars John Hannah, Stephen McCole and Laura McMonagle — hits cinemas next Friday.

For more info visit http://www.theweemanthemovie.com

 


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Coming Soon to EMPIRE CINEMAS

THE WEE MAN

BBFC Consumer Advice: Contains very strong language and strong violence.
*

Calls cost only 10 pence per minute from a BT landline. Mobile and other providers may vary.

http://www.empirecinemas.co.uk/index.php?page=synopsis&filmid=3365


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Interview: Martin Compston talks about his new film The Wee Man

Martin Compston

OF ALL the ways you might expect a ­conversation with Martin Compston to begin, I’m fairly certain that effusive praise of veteran TV actress ­Julia Mackenzie would probably be considered a long shot.

 

But Compston, who’s just finished shooting a Miss Marple with Mackenzie as the St Mary Mead sleuth, can’t praise the ­actress highly enough. Not only is she “an absolute darlin’ ”, but watching her nail that final scene, when Miss Marple assembles everyone to reveal whodunnit, was, he says, an acting masterclass.

IT’S quite a leap from Miss Marple to gangland Glasgow, but then Martin Compston has had the most unlikely mentors, he tells Claire Black

Of all the ways you might expect a ­conversation with Martin Compston to begin, I’m fairly certain that effusive praise of veteran TV actress ­Julia Mackenzie would probably be considered a long shot.

But Compston, who’s just finished shooting a Miss Marple with Mackenzie as the St Mary Mead sleuth, can’t praise the ­actress highly enough. Not only is she “an absolute darlin’ ”, but watching her nail that final scene, when Miss Marple assembles everyone to reveal whodunnit, was, he says, an acting masterclass.

“That denouement scene is hard going and watching her make page after page come alive was amazing,” he says. “You can’t help but look at it and think, ‘What would I do?’, but I’d have skipped over this bit or that bit and she made every word come to life. It’s what I love about this job – you never stop learning.”

Compston might talk with starry-eyed enthusiasm about his co-stars but at 28 he’s already got a decade-long acting career behind him and the future’s not looking too shabby ­either. The Greenock-born actor’s breakout performance was as Liam in Sweet Sixteen, but he learned his trade in three years on ­Monarch Of The Glen. He made his mark on the big screen in gritty indy flicks Red Road and The Disappearance Of Alice Creed, and ­cemented his mainstream ­dramatic chops most recently in last Line Of Duty.

And now there’s his performance as Glasgow gangster Paul Ferris in The Wee Man. Based on Ferris’s memoirs, the film charts his rise through the ranks of Glasgow hoodlums in the 70s and 80s, giving Compston the unenviable task of humanising a man who, when he was still a teenager, became an enforcer for gangster Arthur Thompson, collecting debts on behalf of the man the tabloids dubbed “the Godfather,” and being linked to stabbings, slashings and knee-cappings. Starring alongside Denis Lawson as Ferris Senior and John Hannah as Tam “the Licensee” McGraw, Compston is as watchable as ever, however unpalatable the subject matter.

“Growing up on the west coast, everybody knew who Paul Ferris was,” he says. “Every­one claimed to have a cousin or relative that was connected to him. It was that kind of thing when you went into a pub that people were like ‘don’t talk to him, his cousin’s dad is Paul Ferris.’ ” He laughs and says Ferris was generous with him while he was making the film. He was on hand to give advice but was also clear that the film is fiction not a documentary, and that Compston is playing a dramatic role not doing an impersonation.

“We met and had a chat about it and then he was really hands off, which was great,” he says. “He only came down to the set once and that was him being coaxed by the director for a photoshoot. Paul’s the first to tell you he’s got a chequered past, but from my point of view he was really supportive and just let me get on with it.”

Still, Compston acknowledges there is a certain pressure in playing someone who is not only still alive but is only in his late 40s. “I’ve never made a film that has been this anticipated. I’ve never been stopped in the street so often by so many people from completely different walks of life.”

Compston acknowledges the criticism the film has already attracted, with Strathclyde Police and Glasgow City Council refusing permission for the film be shot in the city (production had to be shifted to London) and a ream of stories appearing in some tabloids about how Ferris’s life story isn’t suitable for the big screen. “I understand the police and the authorities having an issue with it, but banning us from Scotland was a bit much,” Compston says. “I’ve got a lot of friends who are working crew and it took a lot of money out of people’s pockets.”

He’s not convinced by the outrage either. “There are certain papers going against us [the film] yet they are the ones who brought these people to life for us, they glamourised them to sell papers.” He mentions the nicknames certain gangsters were given and the various columns and supplements that have been devoted to this subject. “I think it’s a bit hypocritical that people who have made money out of this in the past are now getting on their high horses,” he says.

Writer/director Ray Burdis leans heavily on the honour amongst thieves narrative, suggesting Ferris abided by a code which ensured “civilians” were excluded from the worst of the violence meted out. Similarly, the film makes a concerted effort to place Ferris’s story within the context of what can happen when a boy is relentlessly bullied, as Ferris was while growing up in Blackhall. As to how convincing either of these devices will be probably depends on what your take is on the damage that organised crime and gangsters wreak on communities. Compston makes an ­eloquent case that in communities where there is little in the way of opportunity or aspiration, being seen as a hard man was – and in some cases still is – one of very few ways to garner respect.

“When I was growing up, it was the guys who were hardest at school who got the prettiest girls,” he says. “It’s a status thing. If you don’t have the chance to go to uni or whatever, it’s a way of having some sort of status in your community, and I can see why that’s attractive to some young guys.

“What I think the film does well is show that there is no glamour in it. You spend your time in these horrible wee pubs, they’re wearing horrible clothes. They’re not Al Capone.”

There are some who might say that success on a bigger stage, namely America, is long overdue for an actor of Compston’s abilities, but for his part, he says he’s got a “really nice” manager in the US who’s always asking him to go over, but things are going so well here it’s hard to get the time.

“America is not the be all and end all. It’d be great to do it but people usually go there during the quiet season, and I’m signed up to do another series of Line Of Duty. I don’t really like to think too far ahead because I’d probably just get stressed out.”

Compston reckons the controversy around The Wee Man could be a bit much to handle, but it’s clear he’s also relishing a project that’s bringing him more attention at home. “A film like Red Road wins awards but basically in Scotland not many people see it, whereas this might not be a Critics Circle film, but everybody is going to see it. That’s a change for me and I’m really excited about it.”

Twitter: @scottiesays

• The Wee Man is in cinemas across Scotland from Friday

http://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/film/interview-martin-compston-talks-about-his-new-film-the-wee-man-1-2734435


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John Hannah: Cops were childish to ban Paul Ferris flick... no one outlawed Goodfellas

One of the gang ... John Hannah starring as Tam McGraw

HOLLYWOOD star John Hannah has blasted cops and councillors for trying to block the movie about hardman Paul Ferris.

The Four Weddings star claims he was amazed that plans to shoot on location in Glasgow were abandoned after permission to film was refused.

Hannah stars as underworld rival Tam ‘The Licensee’ McGraw in the controversial biopic The Wee Man.

But director Ray Burdis insists he was forced by Strathclyde Police and Glasgow City Council to relocate to London.

And Hannah hit out: “Here is a film based on somebody’s book.

“In spite of what you might say about what he did do or didn’t do, he’s written a book and they’re making a film about the book.

“So right away, we’re into entertainment — we’re not making a documentary. Why would the police or the council put themselves on the opposite side of the line to the business of entertainment?

“There’s nothing in the film that wouldn’t have been in the book so it sounds odd and a bit childish.

“How many people went to see the Godfather or Goodfellas?

“Sometimes people in authority can be very immature and very stupid as well. No matter what you might think of Paul Ferris, if you look at this as a film about a wee boy living in a very violent society and what happened to him, then I think it tells the story well.

“It’s a film. A piece of entertainment about the journey of a kid, so anyone who is going to harbour a grudge about what the film is about probably isn’t going to go and see it anyway.”

Spartacus and Rebus star Hannah, 50, said he’d no problem taking on the role of underworld kingpin McGraw, who is shown plotting to assassinate rival Arthur Thompson during a meeting with the Godfather’s own son, Arthur junior.

And while some west of Scotland actors might have felt the need to run a mile from the explosive role because it’s too close to home, Hannah took it all in his stride.

And he reckons growing up in East Kilbride and being sheltered from the brutal gangland scene which dominated the east end of Glasgow during the 70s and 80s might have been a plus factor.

He added: “You’re talking about events of 20-odd years ago. I’m sure that most people that might have taken offence to what’s in the film will realise that it’s exactly that, a film.

“Only a psychopath would focus on members of somebody’s family because they’re involved in the film. But who can account for the actions of a psychopath?

“I didn’t really know about gangsters when I was growing up. I was pretty sheltered.

“Once I got into drama school and then moved south, I had my head down and blinkers on and was working at the Royal Shakespeare Company and thinking that’s the most important thing in the world.

“So to my shame I have to say I didn’t really know that much about what was going on — I didn’t even know the Ice Cream Wars were real when I watched the film Comfort and Joy.

“From my own time, I remember it was all gangs but it just seemed like boys running around the streets because they had nothing better to do.

“Later on when I started going to nightclubs there was always violence or fights and I was at the sharp end of a couple myself. I usually just ended up getting beaten up.”

Hannah acts out one particularly brutal scene when McGraw viciously assaults an unwitting pub singer after he cracks a corny joke.

But he confessed he didn’t see the need to do too much research into the life of millionaire businessman McGraw, who died of a heart attack in 2007. He said: “I’ve found from doing true story films in the past that if you start doing research you come up with a lot of information which isn’t very useful in terms of the film.

“You can’t really turn up on the day and say, ‘Look I’ve found this which totally contradicts what we’re doing’.

“There are so many people involved — directors, writers, producers — that even though you might like to do lots of research you can end up researching stuff which is counterproductive or contrary to what the film is saying.

“Sure I Googled Tam McGraw and looked at some pictures on Flickr, but not much beyond that.

“It’s not really Tam’s journey. Had he been the central character then maybe that’s something I would do, but when you’ve got the film script you are doing entertainment rather than a documentary.”

  • The Wee Man is in cinemas from tomorrow.

 

 



Read more: http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/feeds/smartphone/scotland/4748272/John-Hannah-Cops-were-childish-to-ban-Paul-Ferris-flick-no-one-outlawed-Goodfellas.html#ixzz2IEDEGmtu

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Apollo - West End / Piccadilly Circus

19 Regent Street, London - 0871 220 6000
‎2hr 45min‎‎ - Rated 18‎‎ - Western/Drama‎‎ - English‎ - Trailer - IMDb
13:00‎16:30‎20:00‎22:00
‎1hr 47min‎‎ - Rated 12A‎‎ - Action/Adventure/Drama‎‎ - English‎ - Trailer - IMDb
14:30‎17:15‎20:00‎22:45
‎2hr 6min‎‎ - Rated PG‎‎ - Drama/Action/Adventure‎‎ - English‎ - Trailer - IMDb
13:15‎

The Wee Man
‎1hr 40min‎‎ - Rated 18‎‎ - Drama‎‎ - English‎ - IMDb
13:15‎16:30‎19:15‎22:00
‎2hr 0min‎‎ - Rated 15‎‎ - Drama‎‎ - English‎ - Trailer - IMDb - :
14:00‎16:45‎19:30‎22:15‎

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