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 Ill stick wi extreme make over home edition

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ALEX Salmond has admitted he has to "bite his tongue" to stop himself offending people now he is First Minister.

He said: "I'm doing my best to listen more, to bite my tongue just occasionally, and realise that sometimes you might say something that you might think is incredibly funny but might cause needless offence."

He makes the admission in an STV documentary on his first 100 days in power, which will be broadcast at 7.30pm tonight.

Salmond - who celebrates the milestone on Friday - also said he believes he can win support for independence.

He says: "The more we govern the country well, the more we demonstrate what we can do, the more credibility the SNP build up in government, in the parliament, then the better chance there is of people saying: 'Yeah you've done a good job so far, you could do an even better job with the powers of an independent and equal nation'.

"The public seems to be pretty happy, so I'm pretty happy that the people are happy."

Kwik Fit founder Sir Tom Farmer, who gave money to the SNP, said Salmond is doing a good job and "could be" the man to take Scotland to independence. He added: "Let's have a referendum now to find out where we are as far as the general feeling about independence is in Scotland at the present moment."

Former First Minister Jack McConnell used the programme to launch a fierce attack on Salmond.

He said: "Never accept anything at face value. Always be a little bit sceptical about what you're being told, or when you're being told it."


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Panorama's Wasting Police Time will be broadcast on BBC One on Monday September 17 at 2030 BST.



The identity of a police constable whose internet diaries lifted the lid on modern-day policing has been revealed for the first time by the BBC.

Stuart Davidson, from Staffordshire, risked dismissal from his job to write The Policeman's Blog.

He has told BBC One's Panorama officers were often doing paperwork and chasing targets instead of arresting criminals.

Police and government officials say they accept there is too much bureaucracy involved in the job.

Not even the 36-year-old's closest colleagues knew he was responsible for the blog, which was written under the pen-name of PC David Copperfield and has received over one million hits since he started it.

In his blog Mr Davidson outlined the "madness" of his target-driven duties in a place he called Newtown, which he has now disclosed was Burton-on-Trent.

Speaking openly for the first time, he told Panorama he was frustrated with bureaucracy and paperwork.

"The public think that we solve burglaries, the public think that we're actually on patrol accosting thieves and people who are up to no good," he said.

 

"But what we actually do is attempt to meet government statistics by solving trivial crime."

Staffordshire police said analysis showed officers spent 62% of their time out of the station, but it accepted they have to deal with too much bureaucracy and they're working to change it.

Mr Davidson, who received two commendations during his four years in the force, said about 80% of what he did "was a waste of time".

"I thought nobody else can be doing things that are so insane," he said.

"But it transpires that there are thousands and thousands of other police officers out there doing exactly the same kinds of things

"It depends on the nature of the offence of course, but you arrest somebody and it'll take you the rest of the shift - say eight to 10 hours - to deal with that if it's even remotely complicated."

Mr Davidson said he was sometimes tempted not to make an arrest because processing it would mean so much time off the street.

He is quitting the force in Britain to join the police in Canada.

Panorama filmed with Mr Davidson over six months, including his last days on the force.

It also spoke to other officers up and down the country who feel their job is being undermined. They said they believed the very foundation of police work - that of preventing crime - is being undermined.

And all of them spoke of their frustration at the sheer volume of paperwork.

"We are never there on the streets to provide reassurance, to provide a deterrent and to prevent people from becoming a victim of crime," a former officer told the programme.

Many of their concerns were supported by the Chief Inspectorate of Policing's interim review into policing in England and Wales, which was published last week.

The views are also echoed in responses to a questionnaire distributed to 2,000 beat officers across the country by the Police Federation, which represents 140,000 officers.

The Chief Inspector of Constabulary, Sir Ronnie Flanagan, said police officers in England and Wales are bogged down in red tape and "excess bureaucracy" must be cut to free up police time.

Mr Davidson's blog was dismissed last year by Tony McNulty, Minister for Security, Counter-terrorism, Crime and Policing.

But Mr McNulty told Panorama that he had shifted his position and, while he did not concede everything that Copperfield said was true, things could be improved for officers.

He also said that, while targets are crucial for accountability and measuring performance, they should not get in the way of officers doing their job effectively.

"I want there to be accountability, I want there to be a robust performance framework... but I do not want that getting in the way of effective policing and crucially restoring some discretion to the frontline".

Panorama's Wasting Police Time will be broadcast on BBC One on Monday September 17 at 2030 BST.


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Virgin 1 (SKY 153) to explore UK crime invasion

Virgin Media TV, the content arm of the UK cable company, has commissioned a new 10-part series about multicultural crime that will form part of the primetime line-up of its soon-to-launch flagship channel.

Crime Invasion: Britain's New Underworld will profile the new organised crime groups that dominate the UK's underworld, charting the rise of ethnic groups as key players.

The series, made by independent production company Vashca, will get a primetime slot on Virgin 1, which is due to launch early October.

Crime Invasion promises to cover Albanian pimps, Columbian cocaine cartels, Romanian cash point criminals and Vietnamese cannabis gangs, among others.

The series will focus on how the police, customs and other agencies are working to combat these growing crime networks and will include testimonies from victims and gang members.

Virgin 1 director of programming Celia Taylor said Crime Invasion was a perfect example of how the channel would take a "fresh, compelling approach to factual programming."

#TitleOriginal airdateProduction Code
01"Romanian (cashpoint fraud)"4 October 2007101

 

02"Albanian (Prostitution)"11 October 2007102

 

03"Vietnam (Cannabis)"18 October 2007103

 

04"Yardies (Drugs)"25 October 2007104

 

05"TRIADS"1 November 2007105

 

06"Turkish Mafia (Heroin)"8 November 2007106

Rageh Omaar investigates Asian criminal goups, the main competitors for the UK's heroin trade, and reveals how they have set up their own money laundering system. 

07"Asian Drug Gangs"15 November 2007107

 

08"TBA"22 November 2007108

 

09"TBA"29 November 2007109

 

10"TBA"29 November 2007110

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Reply with quote  #155 

Nice one magpie


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A2, No probs. For those who may have missed any previous programmes, the repeats tend to be on Tuesdays. The following repeats are on Tues 20th November at 11.15pm (2 episodes back to back) and the regular programmes are back on Thursdays - Virgin 1 (sky153) Crime Invasion.
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£60m TV bonanza as millions stay up late to see Hatton fight Merryweather in Vegas...

It will be one of the biggest fights in history. And with millions of viewers paying satellite and cable firms about £15 a time to watch Ricky "Hitman" Hatton take on Floyd Mayweather in Las Vegas early tomorrow, it will also be one of the most lucrative.

Global television revenue is set to top £60million, smashing the £48 million record set when Lennox Lewis beat Mike Tyson in 2002.

And although the bout will be shown here at 4am tomorrow, £30million of that figure will be generated in this country alone.

 

Ricky Hatton

Ricky Hatton is the most heavily backed British sportsman of all time, bookmakers say...

But it is not just the TV companies who are making a killing - the popularity of the boxing match has triggered a £16 million gambling frenzy among UK sports fans.

Bookmakers say Stockport-born Hatton - who is the 13-8 underdog - is the heaviest backed individual British sportsman ever.

William Hill spokesman Graham Sharpe said: "The amount of money being staked on Hatton to win this contest dwarfs the gamble on Lewis Hamilton to win the F1 title, Frank Bruno, Lennox Lewis or Joe Calzaghe winning world titles, Tim Henman to win Wimbledon, Colin Montgomerie to win a major, or Paula Radcliffe to win Olympic gold." Hatton, 29, who is unbeaten in 43 fights, has a huge following because of his toe-to-toe style and ferocious body shots. If he beats current WBC champion Mayweather, who is undefeated in 38 contests and is lauded as one of the greatest ever fighters in the welterweight division, he stands to win more than £5 million.

Among the 3,900 ticket-holders for the event at the MGM Arena are expected to be David Beckham, actors Jude Law and Jason Statham, celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay and former boxing champion Mike Tyson.

More than 25,000 British fans are thought to have travelled to the U.S. to watch the fight on TV in bars.

Gordon Brown said he would be watching the bout at Number 10. "It's going to be a tough fight, but I know Ricky can beat anyone," he added.

Sky Box Office, which is showing the fight for £14.95, said it would not have accurate audience figures until at least five weeks after the event.


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Louis Theroux: Behind Bars is on Sunday 13 January at 2100 BST on BBC Two.


Louis' lock-in...
 
Louis Theroux in San Quentin prison

When Louis Theroux went to San Quentin prison he found a bizarre self-contained society where "straight" men fall in love, gangs are divided along strict racial lines and an inmate can be assaulted for the most minor mistake...

On a sunny day last summer I passed through a metal detector, entered a portcullis-like gate (called a "sally port") and walked into one of America's oldest and most notorious prisons, San Quentin.

I was chaperoned by one of the guards - for security purposes - not to mention a three-person camera crew - for documentary purposes. But I still had butterflies in my stomach.

I'd be doing a 10-day "hitch" for my programme. The idea was to get a glimpse inside the strange, secret world of hardened offenders and the lives they lead "inside".

I'd been warned about the risks involved: we were to stay together as a group at all times; no wandering off. If one of the team had to use a toilet, we would all wait.

Louis Theroux in San Quentin prison
Gangs are divided along racial grounds...
Among the odd requests was that I couldn't wear blue - no jeans, no denim shirts - because it was too similar to the uniforms of the lifers. In prison, the clear distinction between the people doing time and those just visiting is paramount - assuming you want to make it out alive.

Never having been to prison before I had various preconceptions, most of them taken from films and books. I had vague ideas about gangs, prison rape, assaults on guards, guys chalking up their time on their cell wall.

Mainly I was expecting a grim and depressing world of people without hope. Over the next few days some of these preconceptions were confirmed - and more of them were challenged.

Going in, the first thing that strikes you is the strangeness of the physical environment. Much of San Quentin was built in the mid-19th Century and it's a little like being in a medieval-walled town. There are interconnected yards, in the largest there is a baseball diamond and a pristine tennis court. Overlooking them are huge warehouse-like brick buildings full of cells.

Through doorways you see guys in blue sitting at desks taking classes, playing instruments, reading in a library. In the yard men are working out doing pull-ups or sitting round. Then in the background - a little surreally - prisoners in handcuffs are being escorted to hearings. Above, in a continuous ribbon around the prison walls, is the gun rail, staffed at all times by armed guards.

'Battery chickens'

In a way, the appearance of San Quentin is slightly misleading. In the open areas it feels fairly relaxed, but that's because you're only seeing the most trusted prisoners. The vast majority of the inmates are locked away, spending up to 23 hours a day in their cells - as you realise when you walk into one of the cell blocks.

In terms of scale and the way they're organised, walking into one is a little like walking into a barn full of battery chickens. The cells are arranged in long rows on metal tiers, going up five levels. There is constant noise, especially if they spy a camera crew.

Initially I'd been worried it might be a problem that prisoners wouldn't want to speak to me. The reverse was the case. They shout and ask if we were from Lock-Up, a US cable show. "Man, I'll give you a great interview."

San Quentin prison
The prison was built in the mid-19th Century...
We spent the first few days walking around the different sections, grabbing time with whoever caught our eye. In Carson section - San Quentin's "hole" for persistently unruly prisoners - I met some of the most hardened criminals.

These included a character named Playboy Nolan, who was being disciplined for repeatedly "gassing" officers - spraying them with his urine as they walked past his cell. Also David Silva who, with a twinkle in his eye, described using "torture tactics" on his victims during burglaries.

In Alpine section, which houses "PC" prisoners - those in protective custody because they're at risk of attack from other inmates - I met some of the ex-gang members who are now targets themselves. Also, the sex offenders who live in fear of their lives for being viewed as the lowest of the low by other inmates.

Where I could, I got interviews with active gang members, who described their motivations for being part of the gang culture and explained some of the arcane rules of taking part.

'Racial loyalty'

The rules of the gangs were some of the strangest things I heard in prison. The gangs are organised racially - white, black, Hispanic - though there are also two very large and opposed Hispanic groups, the Northerners and Southerners.

Mostly, it's about having physical protection from fellow gang members and being provided for. In return, naturally, you're expected to do their bidding, which chiefly seems to mean assaulting whoever your higher-ups tell you to.

The gangs create camaraderie through racial loyalty, in a quite bizarre way. A white skinhead gang member - part of the Barbarian Brotherhood - casually told me he'd have to beat me up if he saw me taking food or cadging a smoke from a person of another race.

I met another skinhead who'd left his gang because they'd asked him to stab his cellmate for, get this, borrowing a black man's dominoes.

Louis Theroux in San Quentin prison
Theroux spent two weeks talking to inmates
As time passed what I began to see was how being excluded from the outside world had led to new and unlikely kinds of relationship growing up on the inside. I'd known going in that sex went on between prisoners and that guys who on the outside were straight had gay sex for lack of female companionship.

What I hadn't realised was how consuming these relationships could become. I met Rob, a Californian in his 30s and doing time for a laundry list of driving and drug offences. Straight all his life, he'd been assigned a cell with an older transsexual called Debra and ended up falling in love with her.

Rob was so into Debra he was convinced the relationship would keep going when they were both released. Debra seemed a little more realistic. Just as I'd got my head round this I met Chris Mitts, a gay, Jewish car thief in his 20s, who'd just started a relationship with a straight ex-neo-Nazi gang member, who was married with kids.

With the strange warmth of the relationships between the inmates and their surprising receptiveness to us, it was easy to get lulled into a false sense of security. Most of the time, after my first couple of days at the prison, I stopped thinking about my safety.

'Heckles and shouts'

But a couple of times a day an alarm would go off all over the prison, usually meaning a fight had broken out or that officers were having trouble getting prisoners into the cells. Wherever they were, all the prisoners had to lie down, and the atmosphere would thicken and I'd be reminded where I was and what the risks were.

On one of my last days, I was in a small and overcrowded yard with the inmates of Carson section. There'd been a little debate over whether it was safe for us, given the number of people that were out but we went ahead. We wandered about chatting to inmates and I found myself in a little area which seemed be given over to sex offenders.

I was talking to one of the guys, trying to get him to tell me what he was in for, when the alarm sounded. Even my chaperone looked nervous as he gave us the signal to get out. As we picked our way through the prisoners, all of them now lying down on the ground, there were heckles and shouts of abuse directed at us.

What had seemed a relatively benign environment now felt scary and dangerous, and I was relieved when we all made it safely back outside the yard. A few days later I left for good, still not quite believing the strangeness of San Quentin's world-within-a-world and very grateful that I at least had the option of going home.


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Panorama - Britains Protection Racket
Panorama goes undercover in Britain's seven-billion-pound security industry, revealing that a highly organised illegal element still operates in the industry that runs everything from CCTV cameras in our cities to bouncers in our pubs and guards at our hospitals. With testimony from a well-placed whistleblower, it asks whether the body set up to clean up the industry is succeeding, and exposes the loophole that allows criminals to remain and flourish within it.


BBC 1January 21st - 8:30pm
BBC News 24January 24th - 4:30am
BBC 1January 25th - 0:25am
BBC 1January 28th - 8:30pm
BBC News 24January 31st - 4:30am

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Sky One - Wives
Why some women love bad boys

This observational documentary series - which lifts the lid on lifestyles and lifestyle choices in Britain today through the life stories of wives and girlfriends - is picking up strong critical acclaim. Tonight's programme is especially strong, bringing together the women who are attracted to gangsters, as wives living on the Costa del Crime and in the UK speak about the men in their lives.

"If you love somebody you'd give your right arm for them. Alex wouldn't, he'd give me somebody else's," says Becky Loy of her gangster husband. Formerly a nurse and married to an engineer for 27 years, Becky moved to Spain in search of a new life. What greeted her was a lifestyle she never previously considered. Twenty-seven years her husband's senior, Becky lives her life on the edge. "It's not an easy life. I don't know where he is and I don't know if he's coming back. Maybe he's going to get killed. Maybe he'll end up in prison."

Back in the UK, Essex girl Crystal finds herself drawn to the danger of a gangster's lifestyle and could never see herself settling down with a "normal" man who holds down a "boring, predictable, nine to five job". Hailing from London's East End, Crystal's father was friends with the Krays. Her family understands the criminal life and supports Crystal's lifestyle. Holidaying in Marbella, Crystal goes in search of her next gangster boyfriend.

Carlton Leech (pictured) began his life of violent crime as part of West Ham United's Inter City Firm before his wife, Anne (pictured) was even born. Carlton's belief is that "life is about fighting and everybody fights". Since meeting Anne, however, he has left most of his gangster ways behind him and his rise from football hooligan to gangster is documented in the film Rise of the Footsoldier. Until seeing the film at its premiere, Anne was ignorant of much of Carlton's past, but knowing the truth doesn't change anything - she loves her husband.

Sharing their feelings on the aphrodisiac of danger and the attraction of power, these women paint a startling picture of living in fear and uncertainty, while embarking on passionate love affairs.

Highly recommended.



WivesSky OneJanuary 24th - 9:00pm
WivesSky One HDJanuary 24th - 9:00pm
WivesSky TwoJanuary 25th - 10:00pm
WivesSky TwoJanuary 27th - 10:00pm
WivesSky OneJanuary 28th - 0:30am



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YouTube - Rise of the foot soldier

The First online trailer for British gangster movie, Rise of ...
2 min 22 sec -

Rated 4.6 out of 5.0



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Reply with quote  #162 

The wives thing looks like it'll be good, my personal thoughts are that these wummin are not doing anything out of the ordinary and really shouldn't be stigmatized, they are after all only with someone who's near par to themselves as it's not an everyday occurrence to meet someone with the superiority we females possess and wit's a bit o competition over a bit o toast, nothin to us girls yous won't like that boys but it's true n i'm no a feminist at awe  

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Hold on to yer seats as Sam Polling has another investigation into her previously dire attempt  so if your interested  (no pedophiles or sex detectives on this episode) Panorama: Britain's Protection Racket is at 8.30pm tonight on BBC1.


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Quote:
Originally Posted by hammer6
It seems as though Frank Carberry's ex-lover has been economical with the truth again...
 
I have never heard of Paul Ferris having a nickname 'FERRET', perhaps Findlay has had one or two hidden up his A**E :-)
 
Dream on bogus journalist!

Quote:
Originally Posted by REAL1

ARCHIVE/SECURITY/PF:
 
SAM POLING
 
 
"In 2004 I worked undercover for Security Wars to expose a cartel of gunmen and murderers - a programme which later won a Bafta and other international broadcast awards." 

   

Sam Poling

BBC NEWS | Scotland | Faces of Frontline

 

                                                                             Sam

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
                                                                                    
 
                                                                    SAM POLING               
 
 
 
Poling should have handed the sham of an award back as she had won it by deception. She was actively working with a known sex offender on her show but yet it was Mr Ferris and CO who bore the brunt of her dubious documentary. Poling also used an alleged journalist (Russell Findlay and close confidant of Carberry) to stage manage events.What she  never informed people about was her source 'Frank Carberry'.
 
 
 
 
A-Poling Man.

A SECURITY firm boss on the run from police is facing court action over five gay sex attacks.

Frank Carberry, 46, is accused of a series of sexual assaults on young men between 2000 and this year.

His alleged victims are aged from their late teens to early 20s and the incidents span the west of Scotland, Clackmannanshire and the Highlands.

This week a warrant was issued for Carberry's arrest after he failed to appear at Glasgow Sheriff Court to face an assault charge.

The married dad-of-four, who also has a child from an affair, is currently being divorced by wife Ann.

Carberry has claimed to have been an enforcer for the late Glasgow crime boss Arthur Thompson Snr.

But associates say that in reality Carberry, who was born in Maryhill, Glasgow, was simply a thug-for-hire who later drifted into the sex industry.


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Reply with quote  #165 
Utter p**h
Sam Poling

 
 
 




  

                                                                             Sam

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
                                                                                    
 
                                                                    


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