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Hi All... thanks for your posts with regards to 'Whats on TV'.  The Panorama programme, 'Fingerprints In The Dock' was extremely interesting, and for those who missed it....

 

With  regards to Panorama, check out the following:

 

SEE ALSO:
'Relief' over fingerprint verdict
07 Feb 06 |  Scotland
Fingerprints on Trial
12 May 02 |  Panorama
Fingerprint evidence challenged
08 Jul 01 |  Panorama
Finger of Suspicion 8 July 2001
01 Jul 01 |  Panorama
Finger of suspicion: transcript
18 Jan 00 |  Scotland

 


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Friday 7th July, Channel 4, 7.35pm

 

30 Minutes 

 

Ian Blair's Police Record

Hard-hitting current affairs series taking a fresh look at contemporary UK issues. Political columnist Kevin Maguire investigates the reality behind Metropolitan Police Commissioner Ian Blair's reforms and the string

of gaffes that have resulted in his spectacular fall from grace.

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Ian Blair

Sir Ian Blair, QPM (born 19 March 1953) is Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis (head of the Metropolitan Police Service). As such, he is in practice if not formally the most senior police officer in the United Kingdom. He is not related to Tony Blair, the British Prime Minister.

Contents

Education and early career

After attending Wrekin College, Shropshire and Harvard High School, Los Angeles Ian Blair read English Language and English Literature at Christ Church, Oxford. He was awarded a second-class degree.

He commenced his police career in 1974 as a constable in the Soho area of London. He served in both uniform and CID in central London before leaving the Met in 1991 to be staff officer in HM Inspectorate of Constabulary.

In 1994, he moved to Thames Valley Police as Assistant Chief Constable, becoming Deputy Chief Constable there in 1997. He was awarded the Queen's Police Medal in 1999 and received a knighthood in the Queen's Birthday Honours in 2003 for services to policing.

Formerly Deputy Commissioner, and before that Chief Constable of Surrey Police, he took up his current post on 1 February 2005, taking over from Sir John Stevens (now Lord Stevens of Kirkwhelpington).

Jean Charles de Menezes

Main article: Jean Charles de Menezes

Blair's public profile rose considerably when he issued statements during the London bombings on July 7 and 21, 2005.

Sir Ian was the Metropolitan Police Commissioner at the time of the death of the Brazilian Jean Charles de Menezes. Demands have been made for his resignation especially by Alessandro Pereira, a cousin of Menezes. He is currently under investigation by the Independent Police Complaints Commission over accusations that he made false public statements after the shooting, and that he attempted to delay the original inquiry into the shooting.

Following the discovery that de Menezes was not in fact a suspected suicide bomber, Blair apparently considered resigning but quickly came to the decision to remain in office, "because the big job is to defend this country against terrorism and that's what I'm here to do". He may however come under further pressure when the IPPC report is published, and he has admitted that decision would depend "on the level of condemnation"[1].

Blair, or the Metropolitan Police, may face action for libel from one of his Deputy Assistant Commissioners, Brian Paddick. Paddick told the IPCC that a member of Sir Ian's private office team believed the wrong man had been targeted just six hours after the shooting. When this allegation became public following an unauthorised disclosure Scotland Yard issued a statement claiming that the officer alleged to have believed this (Paddick) "has categorically denied this in his interview with, and statement to, the IPCC investigators". The statement continued that they "were satisfied that whatever the reasons for this suggestion being made, it is simply not true". Paddick's interpretation of this statement was that it accused him of lying[2].

On 28 March 2006, Paddick accepted a statement from the Metropolitan Police that it "did not intend to imply" a senior officer had misled the probe into the shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes. In a statement the Metropolitan Police said "any misunderstanding is regretted" and that Paddick had accepted its "clarification" and considered the matter closed[3].

Further controversies

Blair became involved in allegations of the police being "politicised" when he and other senior police officers were known to have lobbied MPs to support Government proposals to hold terrorist suspects for 90 days[4].

Blair is keen to be politically correct and supports community outreach initiatives and campaigns for gay and ethnic minority officers. In January 2006 he attracted considerable controversy when he described the media as institutionally racist[5] (a charge that has also been levelled at the police) for its allegedly unbalanced coverage of crimes against white people as compared to that given to crimes against those from ethnic minorities. As an example had referred to the murder of two young girls in Soham in 2002. He said "almost nobody" understood why it became such a big story. However, he was forced to issue a hurried apology to the parents of Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman for what were widely regarded as insensitive and shocking remarks[6].

In March 2006, pressure was again put on Sir Ian to resign after it was revealed that in Autumn 2005 he had secretly taped several telephone conversations, most notably with the Attorney General, Lord Goldsmith[7]. Although Blair received widespread criticism the chairman of the Metropolitan Police Authority, while describing his actions as "totally unacceptable", said it was not a resigning matter[8]. Much of the latest furore may be attributed to Blair's recent track record of courting controversy with his publicly expressed views. In his defence it has been pointed out that the recording was not illegal and it was said to be simply to enable an accurate record to be taken for him in the absence of a note taker[9].

Blair received further criticism when 78 police officers were involved in an operation to confiscate placards displayed by protestor Brian Haw. After initially telling the Metropolitan Police Authority that the operation had cost £7,200, it later emerged that it had in fact cost £27,000.[1]

Opinion divided

He has been described as a reform-minded, evidence-based moderniser who seeks change to ensure not only that matters are just and fair, but that policing is effective and up to date. On the other hand, Blair is a common target of the right-wing tabloid press, who oppose what they see as excess political correctness, describing Blair as 'New Labour's politically correct provisional wing' and frequently calling on him to resign over one issue or another. He has frequently been accused of incompetence by both left and right, especially in the wake of the June 2006 police raid in Forest Gate, London.


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Friday 14th July 8pm  Sky News Channel

 

CO19 The Front line: A behind the scenes look at Scotland Yard's specialist armed response unit as Mark White reports on the work of the police at the front line of the war on gun crime and terrorism.

 

 

http://www.sky.com/skynews/article/0,,31100-13532617,00.html

 

 

 

 

 

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And you guys in the UK just had a referendum on whether officers should carry firearms and most said NO ???? God bless the female PC that got shot,but it seems that unarmed PCs and the so called solution of awaiting an Armed response team is down right stupid! I know you guys have "so called " gun control, and are somewhat safer as far as gun related deaths are concerned( though most UK people are murdered in stabbings,strangulation, and being BEATEN to death),but do you notice a strange trend?the UK criminals ARE getting GUNS and aren't afraid to use them! Luckily you don't have alot of criminally minded americans living in the UK,we'd find a way to make your streets run "red" with gunshot victims.Sooner or later you guys are going to have to embrace the horror-with violent criminal gangs and Al Qaeda freaks running around Europe, English Bobbies are going to have to start "packing heat" to stay in the "game".............
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Wednesday 26th July BBC 1 9pm

The Boys Who Killed Stephen Lawrence 

 

 

Reporter Mark Daly investigates Britain's most famous unsolved murder - the racist murder of black London teenager Stephen Lawrence in 1993. Daly presents compelling new evidence which fundamentally challenges the alibis of the five main suspects and reveals that police corruption helped shield the killers from conviction.

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Thirteen years ago Stephen Lawrence's death became embedded in the UK's psyche. Three failed police investigations have meant that the killers remain at large.

Mark Daly, the reporter behind the BBC's Bafta-winning Secret Policeman, has spent the past year investigating Britain's most famous unsolved murder. Daly presents compelling new evidence which fundamentally challenges the alibis of the five main suspects and reveals that police corruption helped shield the killers from conviction.

A unique and revealing documentary with unprecedented access to intelligence, detectives, new witnesses and never–before-seen footage, this is the definitive account of the murder of Stephen Lawrence.


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Wednesday 23rd August 2006 Channel Five 8pm

MacIntyre's Big Sting
Investigative series with Donal MacIntyre. Car thieves get a nasty surprise. Donal confronts a man who parks his Lambourghini across two disabled bays. Keith takes on fake disabled parkers. And a reformed car thief explains the tricks of the trade.




http://www.macintyre.com





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When's MacIntyre's Big Sting coming up on UK TV

Subscribe to this DigiGuide Library RSS Feed and always know when MacIntyre's Big Sting is on UK TV


MacIntyre's Big Sting showing on five 23 August 2006 at 20:00   Set Reminder
MacIntyre's Big Sting showing on five 30 August 2006 at 20:00   Set Reminder
MacIntyre's Big Sting showing on five 06 September 2006 at 20:00   Set Reminder

Want to know when MacIntyre's Big Sting is next on, and get reminders, all in a customisable TV guide?


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TUESDAY 29 AUGUST 10pm BBC 4

 

Spy Stories: British Espionage in Fact and Fiction

The link between spying and fiction goes back to the birth of the British secret service. And one of the highlights of this enjoyable journey through a century of espionage comes from former MI5 director-general Dame Stella Rimington. She was the real-life version of James Bond's M, played by Judi Dench in GoldenEye. "When I saw her wearing a jacket like mine, I thought, 'Gosh, she really does look quite like me,'" says Dame Stella.

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

THURSDAY 31 AUGUST 9PM SKY ONE

 

Asbo Fever - Series exploring unexpected uses of Anti-Social Behaviour Orders. No longer are they preserve of problem youths, they are now handed out to wayward lovers, children, soilicitors and even sheep. This edition features pets and their owners who are facing life with an ASBO.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

FRIDAY 01 SEPTEMBER 7.35pm CHANNEL FOUR

 

30 Minutes - Your Kids Under Surveillance

Hard-hitting current affairs series taking a fresh look at contemporary UK issues. Sarah Smith reports on the worrying trend of information gathering by the government. By 2008 the Children's Index will hold a file on every child in the country, ostensibly for child protection, but contrary to the Human Rights Act laws on privacy.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------


 

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 BY Magpie:

FRIDAY 01 SEPTEMBER 7.35pm CHANNEL FOUR

 

30 Minutes - Your Kids Under Surveillance

Hard-hitting current affairs series taking a fresh look at contemporary UK issues. Sarah Smith reports on the worrying trend of information gathering by the government. By 2008 the Children's Index will hold a file on every child in the country, ostensibly for child protection, but contrary to the Human Rights Act laws on privacy.

 **************************************************

Family life faces State 'invasion'... 

Government surveillance of all children, including information on whether they eat five portions of fruit and vegetables a day, will be condemned tomorrow as a Big Brother system.

Experts say it is the biggest state intrusion in history into the role of parents.

Changes being introduced since Victoria Climbié's death from abuse include a £224 million database tracking all 12 million children in England and Wales from birth. The Government expects the programme to be operating within two years.

 

But critics say the electronic files will undermine family privacy and destroy the confidentiality of medical, social work and legal records.

Doctors, schools and the police will have to alert the database to a wide range of "concerns". Two warning flags on a child's record could start an investigation.

There will also be a system of targets and performance indicators for children's development. Children's services have been told to work together to make sure that targets are met.

Child care academics, practitioners and policy experts attending a conference at the London School of Economics will express concern about how the system will work.

Dr Eileen Munro, of the LSE, said that if a child caused concern by failing to make progress towards state targets, detailed information would be gathered. That would include subjective judgments such as "Is the parent providing a positive role model?", as well as sensitive information such as a parent's mental health.

"They include consuming five portions of fruit and veg a day, which I am baffled how they will measure," she said. "The country is moving from 'parents are free to bring children up as they think best as long as they are not abusive

or neglectful' to a more coercive 'parents must bring children up to conform to the state's views of what is best'."

The Children Act 2004 gave the Government the powers to create the database.

Experts fear that genuine cases of neglect will be missed in the mass of detail.

"When you are looking for a needle in a haystack, is it necessary to keep building bigger haystacks?" said Jonathan Bamford, the assistant commissioner at the Information Commissioner's office, which promotes access to official information and the protection of personal information.

Keeping check on 11 million or 12 million children, when the justification for the database was that three or four million were in some way "at risk", was "not proportionate", he said.

"The cause for concern indicator against a child's record is expressed in very broad language. For example, it could be cause for concern that a child is not progressing well towards his or her French GCSE."

Arch, the children's rights organisation, was also worried. It said: "Government databases have a dreadful record."

It was revealed this year that more than half a million children had been entered on a DNA database created to record known offenders, even though many had never been charged with an offence.

Eight-year-old Victoria Climbié died in 2000 while living with her aunt, Marie-Therese Kouao, and her aunt's boyfriend, Carl Manning, despite having been seen by dozens of social workers, nurses, doctors and police officers.

The Department for Education and Skills said: "We need to ensure that professionals work across service boundaries for the benefit of children.

"Our proposals balance the need to do everything we can to improve children's life chances whilst ensuring strong safeguards to make sure that information stored is minimal, secure and used appropriately.

"Parents and young people will be able to ask to see their data and make amendments and will retain full rights under the Data Protection Act."


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MONDAY 04 SEPTEMBER  Channel 4  8:00pm

 

Dispatches: How safe is Heathrow?

 

In the light of August's terrorist threat at Heathrow airport, the current affairs series presents worrying evidence that calls the airport's security into question. Security breaches are revealed that could make it vulnerable to million-pound heists and terrorist attacks.

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

TUESDAY 05 SEPTEMBER  BBC1  9:00pm

 

Jill Dando's Murder: The New Evidence

 

Panorama special which uncovers new evidence surrounding the murder of BBC television presenter Jill Dando, and questions whether the jury that convicted Barry George for the crime heard the full story

 

 

 

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Special Report: Disturbing new evidence may reveal a miscarriage of justice in Dando case

Two new witnesses have come forward with testimony that could undermine the police case against the man now serving life for the TV presenter's murder. Sophie Goodchild and Jonathan Owen report

Published: 27 August 2006

He made an unlikely assassin. Ordering Jill Dando to kneel on the doorstep of her home, Barry George, an epileptic with learning disabilities, calmly pumped a single gunshot into the Crimewatch presenter's head.

Amid a public outcry over the killing, police tracked George, who was known to have an obsession with the glamorous 37-year-old, hoarding newspaper cuttings about the BBC star in his dingy Fulham flat. He also had a conviction for attempted rape and an "interest" in guns. Case closed. Or so it seemed.


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LOW WINTER SUN   Channel 4 at 9pm on Thursday, Sept 14. Part two can be seen on More4 at 10.35pm on the same night or on Channel 4 on Thursday, Sept 21 at 9pm

 

The Sunday Times September 03, 2006

The cops are the killers

Set in an Edinburgh dogged by unrelenting cruelty and murderous detectives, Low Winter Sun redefines the TV cop show as epic drama, writes Benji Wilson

In a hangar on a disused airstrip some way south of Edinburgh, the actor Burn Gorman has just been sick. He hasn’t actually thrown up — this is the magic of television, so he glugs from a Thermos of lukewarm lentil soup before every take. But when you look at his surroundings, it’s hard to be sure.
 

“I didn’t really need that much help puking,” he says.

 

The stage where one of the climactic scenes of Low Winter Sun is being filmed looks like the seventh chamber of hell. It has been dressed up as an illegal abattoir and the carcasses are real: racks of pigs heads are interspersed with decaying horse flesh.

Neve McIntosh, another of the lead cast, is visibly upset by the stench and the gruesome props. “This is the worst thing I’ve ever had to do,” she mutters. If this is what Low Winter Sun is doing to its cast, then we the audience had better be prepared.

The film is a two-part thriller starting on Channel 4 next week. Set against the backdrop of a glowering, sullen Edinburgh, it tells the story of two policemen, DS Frank Agnew (Mark Strong) and DC Joe Geddes (Brian McCardie), and it begins with a murder.

That’s par for the course in a police drama, except that this murder is perpetrated by Agnew and Geddes and it’s their bloated, shop-soiled colleague Brendan McCann that they’re dumping in the Firth of Forth. They therefore soon find themselves in the invidious position of investigating a murder that they committed.

Theirs is a distinctly uneasy partnership — Agnew, we soon learn, has killed for love. Geddes, meanwhile, has been egging him on to pursue his own agenda. The moral scheme is further mangled when Agnew discovers McCann was under investigation for corruption.

From such snarled beginnings things move extraordinarily fast — the film spirals into a miasma of violence and corruption in a matter of only two days’ screen time, and, as things unravel, it ceases to be a matter of who did it or why.

By part two Geddes suffers a sound beating and spends most of the episode looking like the Elephant Man has blundered into The Evil Dead.

A steady stream of cadavers is laid out on the pathologist’s slab, all of them so disfigured it’s not immediately obvious which way round they are lying. The overriding sense of decay and putrefaction is compounded by lingering, shadowy shots drenched in deep reds and blues.

If TV were scratch-and-sniff, this drama would positively reek. But then Low Winter Sun, as a cast member stresses, is aiming much higher than cops and robbers.

“There’s a genre of show — ‘cops’ — that I wouldn’t want to be in unless it’s something unusual,” says Strong. “This is unusual. It takes a format that we all think we are familiar with and elevates it somewhere else.

“We always talked about this as a dark, gothic thriller before it was a cop show. Two guys murder somebody for their own reasons — they just happen to be policemen.”

Many TV police dramas have aspirations beyond The Bill, but the director’s name on this one — Adrian Shergold — suggests Strong’s insistence that Low Winter Sun is a cut above deserves some credence.

Shergold comes with a body of idiosyncratic, award-winning work behind him, most recently directing Timothy Spall in Pierrepoint, a film made for television that ended up in the cinema. He also directed the excellent Dirty Filthy Love on ITV and The Second Coming starring Christopher Eccleston for the BBC.

 

Strong, an award-winner for the BBC2 adaptation of Jake Arnott’s The Long Firm, has worked with Shergold before on Births, Marriages and Deaths, with Ray Winstone and Phil Davis.

“Adrian has a really epic view of drama — not bogged down in the everyday minutiae of ordinary stuff. It was no surprise to me that he liked Simon Donald’s script.  “This, I thought, was on a grand level, like Faust and Mephistopheles or Othello and Iago. There’s a guy, my character, who’s absolutely fine. He’s a regular bloke, a CID officer, a good policeman, somebody people trust. He’s persuaded to do something by somebody else and it turns his world upside down, leading them both into a living hell. It’s no accident it ends in this disgusting abattoir.”

Shergold extends the parallels with classical tragedy. “I wouldn’t describe it as a cop show. The fact that the guys are policemen is about as far as it goes. It’s more a story of redemption. Two men commit an act they try and make look like a suicide, but one of them is doing it for love, the other to regain his soul.”

He pauses, then reconsiders. “That sounds really heavy. Let me put it another way. It’s like bad meat, good meat, human meat, horrible meat . . . It’s all about meat.”

As if to prove his point he proceeds to show me — with barely disguised relish — some digi-video footage he took of the abattoir scene. The message is clear here, as it is throughout the film: murder and flesh cannot be separated; murder is meat.

On hand to supply most of the bodies in Low Winter Sun are the Carnegie brothers, the owners of the knock-off abattoirs and kingpins of the Edinburgh underworld.

Thoroughly nasty pieces of work, they make the Krays look like the Chuckle Brothers and they are more than prepared to use all the tools of their assumed trade, including percussive bolt guns and high-pressure steam blasters for taking meat off bones.

The nastier of the two, Liam, is played by Alex Ferns, whose role as Evil Trevor in EastEnders has made him the small screen’s leading psychopath.

Come early evening, down at the five-a-side centre in Portobello, we get to see why. Looking down on a floodlit pitch from the elevated bar, Ferns is being filmed picking a fight with an opposing defender.

His hair is longer than it used to be, but his voice is still caustic and his eyes blaze with malice as he struts and bristles. Then laughs, which is the scariest part.

He says he’d like to get away from amoral psychopaths, but on this evidence there’s nobody better. “The Carnegies are criminals and entrepreneurs, running saunas, brothels, dodgy abattoirs,” he says. “They’re cunning and they’re bonkers. They don’t give a shit about anything and they do some awful things. To them it’s business. They’re the worst of the worst.”

 

Which, in Low Winter Sun, is really saying something because, as Strong concludes: “It descends about as far as you can go.”

 

Low Winter Sun begins on Channel 4 at 9pm on Thursday, Sept 14. Part two can be seen on More4 at 10.35pm on the same night or on Channel 4 on Thursday, Sept 21 at 9pm

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Reply with quote  #30 
I NOTICED THAT THE "LOCK STOCK" SERIES IS BACK ON AGAIN, ITS ON MEN & MOTORS ON A TUESDAY AT 10 FOR ANYONE WHO IS INTERESTED. 
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