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mactheknife

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In some districts there was a belief in a sound of a mysterious kind that was heard before the perpetration of any dreadful crime, as murder.

A murder was committed at Cottertown of Auchanasie, near Keith, on the 11th January, 1797.

 

Here is the tradition:--On the day on which the deed was done two men, strangers to the district, called at a farmhouse about three miles from the house in which lived the old folk that were murdered.

 

The two strangers were suspected of being guilty of the crime.

 

Shortly before the deed was committed a sound was heard passing along the road the two men were seen to take in the direction of the place at which the murder was perpetrated.

 

So loud and extraordinary was the sound that the people left their houses to see what it was that was passing.

 

To the amazement of everyone, nothing was to be seen, though it was moonlight, and moonlight so bright that it aroused attention. Near neighbours met, and discussed what the sound could be.

 

All believed something dreadful was to happen, and some proposed to follow the sound.

 

The more cautious, however, prevailed over the more fiery. One man, of the name of Newlands, and a man of great courage and strength, was with the utmost difficulty prevented from following in the wake of the sound.

 

About the time this discussion was going on, a blaze of fire arose on the hill of Auchanasie.

 

The foul deed had been accomplished,and the cottage set on fire.

 

By next day all knew of what the mysterious sound had been the forerunner. 1


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ferrisconspiracy : ARCHIVE

 

The lies we told to put 2 innocent men behind bars for life; COMING CLEAN: Witnesses reveal their part in wrongful conviction of `Ice Cream War killers'.(News)


12/9/1996

Three vital witnesses against the Ice Cream War "killers" told yesterday how police made them frame Joe Steele and TC Campbell.

William Love, Joe Granger and Granger's girlfriend Lynn Chalmers claim they were forced to lie about the "Glasgow Two" - jailed for life in 1984 for murdering six members of one family.

Joe says he was brutally beaten until he implicated Steele and Campbell .

When he changed his story in court, he was charged with perjury and jailed for five years.

Campbell and Steele have never stopped protesting their innocence. Steele was finally freed last week pending an appeal, and Campbell hopes to be released soon.

Joe, Lynn and Love insist Steele and Campbell suffered one of the worst injustices seen in Scotland. And they all want to help end it.

Joe Granger was pulled in for questioning after six members of the Doyle family - including an 18-month-old baby - died in an arson attack at their home in Ruchazie, Glasgow

He was 22, and had grown up with Campbell and Steele in Glasgow's east end.

 

Thomas Campbell was a notorious hardman, involved in the violent battle for the local ice cream trade. One of the Doyles, Andrew, ran an ice cream van.

Steele was a small-time heavy from a feared local family.

Joe says police wanted him to admit he was the "clock man" - or lookout - for Campbell and Steele on the night of the killings, even though he'd been at home with Lynn at the time.

He said: "I wasn't involved in any ice cream vans, and I didn't know much about it.

"But from the very start, the cops said they knew I was part of the murder. They interrogated me for hours on end.

"They said I'd get 30 years, and my girlfriend would be done as well.

"All the time they were slapping me, pulling my hair.

"At one point, one of them hit me with the lid of a desk.

"I fell on the ground and they kicked the s*** out of me.

"They had a statement they wanted me to sign. It said I was clock man the night of the murders.

"I was such a mental wreck by the end of it all that I signed it.

"But I knew it was a lie. I didn't even know the Doyles.

"As soon as I came out of the police station, I went to see a lawyer and told him what I had been made to do.

"I was told the best thing to do was to tell the truth when I came to court."

Detectives were stunned when Joe turned on them from the witness box. He recalled: "I told the whole truth. I said I made a statement because they beat me into it.

"I told the jury I knew nothing about the murder."

When he walked out of court that day, Joe was stopped by police and charged with perjury. He was eventually jailed for five years.

He took his case to the European Court of Human Rights, where judges ruled he did not get a fair trial. But he still had to serve out his sentence.

He added: "I spent five years in jail for telling the truth.

"My whole life has been ruined because I will always be linked to the Doyle murders. Where is the justice in that?"

Joe's live-in girlfriend Lynn Chalmers, now 32, was only 19 when she was caught up in the investigation.

She says police bullied her into signing a statement that Joe was out of the house when the Doyles were murdered.

Lynn said: "Joe and me had been at home watching telly, and went to the Netherfield Bar in Ruchazie for an hour. Then we came home. That is the absolute truth.

"But within days of the murder police were following me around, telling me they knew Joe left me in the house and went for a walk that night.

"That just didn't happen. But I was only a wee lassie, and they kept saying he was being done anyway and would get 30 years.

"They said if I signed this statement, nothing would happen to Joe.

I finally signed it. But it was total fiction."

Lynn also changed her story in court and was charged with perjury.

Her case never came to trial, but the stress of seeing Joe jailed helped put her in hospital with a nervous breakdown.

"We were caught up in this totally innocently," said Lynn.

"The last 12 years of our lives have been a nightmare. We will never be able to shake it off.

"But the police know what happened. They know the strain they put me under to sign a statement they had fabricated."

After Joe and Lynn's testimony, the trial judge told the jury there was nothing to link Steele and Campbell to the crime scene. They still convicted them.

The jury had heard the crucial evidence of Glasgow ned William Love. He told how he overheard a conversation in the Netherfield Bar a month before the killings, mentioning a plan to torch the Doyles' front door.

Love now admits lying to buy his freedom from Barlinnie jail.

He was on remand awaiting trial for armed robbery on the night of the murder, and had been refused bail twice because he was considered a menace to society.

As soon as he gave a statement to detectives about his alleged eavesdropping in the Netherfield, bail was granted.

Love now admits the conversation in the pub never happened.

He said: "My evidence was a lie. The cops forced me to make that statement.

"They were threatening me with all sorts of charges, and they said I would get off with the armed robbery charge. That's why I did it."

Love had three previous convictions for attempting to pervert the course of justice.

But the Crown never shared this key fact with Campbell and Steele's lawyers, even though it could have discredited his evidence.

Love also put TC Campbell's close friend Thomas "Tamby" Gray behind bars.

He claimed Tamby fired a shotgun at the Doyle ice cream van a few weeks before the murder.

Love has since confessed to firing the shotgun himself. Thomas served nine years of a 14- year sentence for a crime he didn't commit.

Thomas said: "Love even pointed at me from the witness box as I sat in the dock and said it was me who fired the shotgun.

"But he knew it was him who did it.

"Love knew he was facing 15 years for the shotgun attack, and made a deal with the cops that he would finger everybody for the Doyle murders if he got off. That's exactly what happened."

He added: "Jail ruined my life. Since I was released I have suffered panic attacks and anxiety because I could never adjust to life inside.

"The only reason I was done was because of my association with TC Campbell. The police were determined to build up a scenario that would link me and him.

"It is all a scandal from start to finish."

Two of the leading police officers on the case are now dead.

Detective Chief Superintendent Charles Craig, head of the CID at the time, died in 1991 at the age of 57.

The body of his sidekick, Detective Superintendent Norrie Walker, was found in his fume-filled car in a country lane four years after the trial.

A hose pipe had been attached to the exhaust and fed inside.

DCS Craig knew he had to solve one of the most harrowing crimes in Scotland's history.

Detectives flooded the east end in search of a motive and a suspect for the Doyle murders.

The Ice Cream War, which some criminal figures claim never even happened, gave him the motive.

And a picture was built up implicating Steele, Campbell and others.

Underworld sources claim Craig plotted to frame Campbell and Steele. And the Ice Cream War case is not the only one which has put him under suspicion.

In 1982, police were trying and failing to pin down Raymond Gilmour as the killer of Pamela Hastie in Johnstone, Renfrewshire.

Within days of Craig being called in, Gilmour confessed. He was jailed for life, and has been protesting his innocence ever since.

DS Walker was 63 when he killed himself. William Love says it was Walker who visited him in Barlinnie and got him to sign the false statement.

And TC Campbell claims Walker quoted false statements to him, saying other people were prepared to go against him.

Other officers involved in building a case against Campbell and Steele have gone on to promoted posts within Strathclyde Police.

A force spokeswoman refused to say anything about the claims that witnesses were bullied.

She said: "It would be inappropriate to comment, as this case is going to appeal."

 

ferrisconspiracy : VIEW

 

OK so now the Appeal has been dealt with will another 'Force Spokeswoman' please come out and.................... COMMENT?


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ARCHIVE

 

ICE CREAM LAWYER ATTACKS FIT-UP: JUSTICE IN THE DOCK; EXCLUSIVE Steele's man says new appeals will follow as police evidence comes under scrutiny 20 years ago people were likely to believe the police, since then ther Steele's lawyer JOHN CARROLL.(News)

THE LAWYER who led Joe Steele's fight for justice yesterday said his stunning victory will mean freedom for others behind bars for crimes they never committed.

John Carroll said clearing Steele for the notorious Ice Cream War murders will change the face of Scottish justice.

And he claimed the reputation of the police is now in the dock after judges rejected the damning evidence delivered by officers at Steele's original trial.

Mr Carroll, 56, a former policeman who has gained a reputation as one of the sharpest criminal defence lawyers in Scotland, said: 'If the very same evidence that convicted Joe Steele in 1984 was brought to court today, the case would be thrown out.

'Twenty years ago, the public were less likely to consider the possibility of police malpractice.

'But since then, there has been a radical change in public attitude.

'There will be now be other appeals on a similar basis.'

Mr Carroll said the key was the erosion of complete trust in evidence from the police.

The Ice Cream Wars case against Steele and Thomas 'TC' Campbell collapsed after experts trashed police evidence and claimed officers deliberately fitted the men up.

Mr Carroll said: 'Till now, Scotland has been reluctant to tackle the prickly subject of police malpractice.

'The English courts have faced up to it and there have been a number of historic judgments there.

'But this is the first time there has been such an acknowledgement in Scotland. I believe it will bring change for the better.

'The public must have faith in the judicial system. This case can only help build that faith.'

Steele spent 18 years in jail on the basis of three pieces of evidence which have now been discredited.

His conviction hinged on two conversations, allegedly overheard in East End bars, during which Steele was not meant to have said a word.

Statements made by police were also proved to be suspect.

Forensic linguist Professor Brian Clifford painstakingly examined evidence led by Strathclyde Police officers during the 1984 trial.

After hundreds of tests, he found not one person could achieve the absolute recall the officers insisted they had without collaborating.

Police claimed that when they arrested him, Steele said: 'I thought you'd have been here before now.' And: 'I wisnae the wan that lit the match.' But Prof Clifford ruled such perfect recall was 'almost impossible'.

Steele, 42, and Campbell, 54, were jailed for the 1984 massacre of six members of the Doyle family, including an 18-month-old baby.

The Doyles died after fire ripped through their home in Bankhead Street, Ruchazie, Glasgow, victims of a violent battle to gain control of lucrative ice cream van routes in East End housing schemes. Andrew 'Fat Boy' Doyle, 18, had refused to be intimidated over his Marchetti ice cream run, despite being shot at while in his van.

Andrew, his brothers James, 23, and Anthony, 14, father James, 53, sister Christine Halleron, 22, and her baby son Mark all perished when petrol was used to set fire to their flat.

TC Campbell and his family were also involved in the ice cream business and their vans carried the Fifti's Ices logo, the same as gangland godfather Tam McGraw.

Now Campbell is pointing the finger at McGraw, known as The Licensee, who went on to make a fortune from taxi firms while Campbell languished in jail.

Last week, we revealed Steele detests Campbell, accusing him of being up to his neck in the Ice Cream Wars and blaming him for ruining his life.

Steele's lawyer refused to give up the fight to clear his client's name. Mr Carroll said: 'Persistence is bred into me. I never felt like giving up.

'The only time I was rocked back on my heels was when Joe was fighting for his life after a heart bypass. I felt terrible that he'd been put through all the stress and strain of those years, only to end up in hospital.'

Steele's jail breakouts, although not condoned by Mr Carroll, did give him cause to smile.

The lawyer said: 'At least Joe Steele had the good grace to break out. He wasn't mistakenly let out as has happened in the past.

'I did have a wry smile when I heard Joe had glued himself to the gates of Buckingham Palace in protest. He was never a danger to the public and only wanted to bring attention to his plight.'

Mr Carroll has nothing but praise for the Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission, who played a pivotal role in having the convictions overturned.

He said: 'Despite their critics, I believe they are a breath of fresh air. They certainly did us proud.'

But Mr Carroll has taken steps to distance himself and Steele from statements made by Campbell a former client and his new lawyer, Amer Anwar.

He is concerned at Anwar's call for a full public inquiry into police handling of the Ice Cream Wars case.

He said: 'Nothing Mr Anwar said after the appeal hearing was ever said with the approval or authority of Mr Steele or me. It is important for people to know that if Mr Anwar has anything to say, he can only do so on behalf of his client or himself. Mr Steele and I are concerned that the words of Mr Anwar appear to represent the views of my client.

'Together, we take a very serious view of this as it touches upon matters of professional standards.

'In my professional view, those words could be damaging to Mr Steele's interests and rights and that is a very serious professional issue.'

mailfile

miscarriage cases

Paddy Meehan: Glasgow safeblower, jailed for life for the murder of Rachel Ross who died during a robbery in Ayr. Meehan's lawyer Joe Beltrami knew another client, William 'Tank' McGuinness, had killed Ms Ross but was bound to secrecy. Only after McGuinness was killed in 1976 could Beltrami issue a murder confession and Meehan was freed.

Ernie Barrie: Released from prison in 1988 following a four-year battle to clear his name after being jailed for 18 years for a pounds 40,000 armed robbery at a bank in Blantyre, Lanarkshire. CCTV evidence police used to nail Ernie later proved to show a different man.

Stefan Kiszko: Spent 16 years in jail for the rape and murder of 11-year-old Lesley Molseed in 1975. Released in 1992 after forensic tests proved his innocence.

The Birmingham Six: Hugh Callaghan, Paddy Hill, Robert Hunter, Richard McIlkenny, William Power and John Walker were freed in 1991 after 16 years in jail for IRA Birmingham pub bombings in 1974 which killed 21. The Appeal Court heard that police had fabricated evidence.

The Guildford Four: Paul Hill, Patrick Armstrong, Carole Richardson and Gerard Conlon were jailed for life for killing five in IRA pub bombings in 1974. They were released in 1989 after the convictions were ruled unsafe.

Then there has been a radical change.  

 


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mactheknife

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Useless now.

Like this most inadequate husk.

Like his mission.

Like the scent of burnt-out worlds he'd left in his wake.

The blank face on the ace of spades.

Pointing toward him.

A black empty heart with a dagger in its belly.


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Large Audio Image

The BBC's Colin Blane

Small Audio Icon Real Media

"Thomas Campbell and Joseph Steele claimed they had been framed"

11 Dec 2001

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This case is as shocking today as it was all those years ago. What makes it horrendous is the fact that the police covered up for a mass murderer!
 

Glasgow "ice cream war" case

Scotland on Sunday Sun 21 Mar 2004

Who did kill the Doyles?

Ian Johnston

LORD KINCRAIG turned to the jury of 10 women and five men at Glasgow High Court. He looked grim as he spelled out just what they would have to believe if the men accused of what was then Scotland’s worst multiple murder were to go free.

The judge warned that if Tommy ‘TC’ Campbell and Joe Steele were telling the truth, then the jury would have to accept that "not one or two or four but a large number of detectives have deliberately come here to perjure themselves, to build up a false case against an accused person". It would mean there had been a conspiracy by officers of the "most sinister and serious kind... to saddle the accused wrongly with the crimes of murder and attempted murder, and a murder of a horrendous nature".

Last week, 20 years after Campbell and Steele were sentenced to life in prison for the murders of six members of the Doyle family during Glasgow’s notorious Ice Cream Wars, the Court of Appeal ruled that both men had been wrongly convicted. The implication was clear: the jury should have believed the men.

Now the words of Lord Kincraig - who clearly found the allegations of police corruption hard to accept - have come back to haunt Strathclyde Police. Campbell’s lawyer Aamer Anwar points to Kincraig’s summing up at the end of the original trial as a compelling reason why there should now be a public inquiry. He argues that the case is no longer only about Campbell and Steele, and what has now been ruled one of the gravest miscarriages of justice in Scottish legal history, but that it could be just the tip of an iceberg. To have confidence in the system, the public must be sure the same methods were not used to wrongly convict scores of others.

Campbell, 51, is now calling for a fresh murder inquiry to bring those who were responsible for the murder of the Doyle family to justice. However, the reaction from the Crown Office suggests that even though he and Steele are now deemed to be innocent, this is unlikely to happen. "Our position remains there are no new lines of inquiry in this case and there are no new suspects," a spokeswoman said.

Campbell and Steele were cleared after evidence from psychologists cast doubt on testimony given by police officers concerning incriminating statements said to have been made by both defendants. Four officers reported Campbell as saying: "I only wanted the van windows shot up. The fire at Fat Boy’s [a member of the Doyle family] was only meant to be a frightener which went too far."

Campbell denied making that statement and Steele also denied saying to four detectives in a police car that "I’m no’ the one that lit the match" and telling them earlier: "I thought you would have been here before now."

The officers’ recollections of what was said - known as ‘verbals’ - were nearly identical. But the psychologists said studies showed people did not remember even such short sentences word for word. This was enough for the appeal court judges to decide the jury would have viewed the police’s evidence in a different light and the convictions were unsafe.

It is a sign of changing times: in 1984 the defence’s claims that the police had manufactured statements was regarded as outrageous and unbelievable to most.

Some 20 years later Campbell has not finished making extraordinary allegations. In an interview with Scotland on Sunday last week, he claimed to have been given evidence during his long campaign to prove his innocence suggesting the man behind the murders was the notorious Glasgow gangster Tam ‘The Licensee’ McGraw, who was arrested but released during the original inquiry.

Furthermore, Campbell believes the gangster has been behind repeated attempts to kill him since his release from prison pending appeal, in an attempt to shut him up.

The two men were once on friendly terms, but Campbell said that while serving his life sentence he began to suspect McGraw was "making moves against me to make sure I stayed in jail" by hampering attempts by friends in Glasgow to find evidence to clear him.

"Then it became clear why he was doing it. If our conviction stood, there could be no investigation into him or anything he had done," said Campbell. He has claimed that two men who seriously injured him with knives and golf clubs in a vicious fight following his release on bail pending the appeal were McGraw and a since murdered henchman called Billy McPhee.

"What McGraw was angry about is I’m grassing him for the Doyle fire. If he had buried me before the appeal then the conviction would have stood because I wouldn’t have been there to defend myself," Campbell said.

He is now waiting for the next assassination attempt in an effort to stop him giving evidence to any new investigation or public inquiry. "It’s just usual to me. It’s just daily life," he said. "There was a point in time I had to avoid cars trying to cut me off on the pavement and people with knives. One time I went into a hardware store, bought an axe and when I came out they all ran away. There have been people with firearms and there’s been me dodging through gardens to get away. It was twice a week.

"The police said they were ‘obliged to tell me’ that contracts have been taken up and my life is in danger and that danger is active and imminent. To tell you the truth, I don’t f***ing care. I won’t let people threaten me or intimidate me. I’ll just do what I think is right."

On Friday last week, Campbell and his lawyer visited the headquarters of Strathclyde Police. They handed in a letter calling for a new investigation in light of the appeal court ruling, and lodged an official complaint.

"The police need to do an investigation so I can give them the information I have and let them do the work," Campbell said, although he admits that while he suspects McGraw’s involvement in the fire, "at the end of the day, I’m not a witness to it".

"I can only say to the police I’ve found out information from this source and that source," Campbell said.

His information includes claims that McGraw associates bought a can of petrol from a garage shortly before the fire. Campbell said the witnesses told him they had given this information to police during the original investigation but had been ignored.

‘It is not acceptable for police forces to investigate themselves’

However, it is understood that police are highly unlikely to view information that had been discarded at the time as new evidence that would warrant the re-opening of the case.

And claims from Campbell - notorious for extreme violence as the leader of the infamous Gaucho Razor Gang in Glasgow - about someone he clearly hates may simply be put down to an underworld feud.

The reality is the true identity of the people who murdered the Doyles will almost certainly never be known. Only suspicions remain.

Joe Steele, 42, twice escaped from prison during his sentence to mount protests claiming his innocence, gluing himself to the gates of Buckingham Palace on one occasion.

But he has maintained a low profile since the conviction was quashed and now simply wants to get on with life. His lawyer John Carroll said: "He’s lost some of the best years of his life and is wanting to spend time with his family. He has asked in the past for an inquiry but now he has won his appeal he has, in a sense, had that inquiry."

Carroll dismissed any talk of who might have been responsible for the murders. "Suspicion is no good. It was suspicion and tittle-tattle that put them in jail in the first place," he said. "From Steele’s point of view it really is a matter for the police to look into and the police have already stated they are not looking for any suspects."

Both Steele and Campbell are believed to be in line for substantial compensation payouts, possibly of more than £1m each.

Strathclyde Police have remained tight-lipped in the aftermath of the appeal court ruling. A spokeswoman said the force was waiting to examine the written judgment made in the case. She confirmed the force had accepted the letter from Campbell’s lawyer, and added: "We will examine its contents."

Anwar is also writing to First Minister Jack McConnell and Lord Advocate Colin Boyd to call for an inquiry, and his demand is already backed by several opposition politicians.

His letter to police called for an immediate apology, claimed there was a "whispering campaign" against Campbell and said charges should be brought against anyone believed to have perverted the course of justice.

Anwar believes there could be many other people who have been jailed on the strength of police statements that would be discredited by the psychologists whose evidence cleared Campbell and Rae.

His letter to Strathclyde’s Chief Constable Willie Rae states: "Whilst Strathclyde Police will be concerned at opening the ‘floodgates’, we would respectfully submit your concern should not be one of avoiding compensation claims by tens if not hundreds."

Anwar said the whole affair showed there was a need for an independent body to investigate complaints against the police. "It’s not acceptable for police forces to investigate themselves. An independent body is being introduced in England and there’s one existing in Northern Ireland, but in Scotland we don’t have one," he said. "Right up until three weeks ago the police were still fighting this and the Crown Office were still fighting this.

"The vast majority of officers within the police do a good job and a very difficult job. But when issues like this arise it is an indictment of the police force that they close ranks and feel it is not in their interest to carry out an impartial investigation. That is damaging to public confidence."

Eminent defence lawyer Joe Beltrami, who represented a relative of Campbell who was among those picked up by police then released during the inquiry, and represented Campbell in previous cases including serious assault, said he always found it hard to believe the hardman had blurted out a damaging admission.

"I felt there was a shortage of evidence. There was no forensic evidence, none at all. The case really depended in the main on the statement [allegedly] made by Campbell to the police," he said.

"When I heard he was supposed to have made a damaging comment I was a bit taken aback because he had been through the courts umpteen times before and wasn’t the sort of person to say anything at all to the police. I was astonished he said anything."

He also found Campbell’s and Steele’s persistent and strenuous denials convincing. "I was disturbed when Campbell was convicted and from the very beginning I was rooting for him," Beltrami said. "And people very often protest their innocence after conviction, but this normally finishes in a fortnight or three weeks, it doesn’t go on for 20 years."

Crime writer Reg McKay, who wrote a book with Campbell called Indictment: Trial By Fire about the case, is another long-standing supporter of the two men’s claims they had nothing to do with the fire that massacred the Doyles.

However, he is uncompromising about their criminal past. He described Steele as a "lowlife crook who would rob your granny’s meter". And as the leader of the Gaucho Razor Gang, Campbell was involved in "mindless violence, fighting for territory" in the Carntyne area of Glasgow.

"He was a vicious, vicious cruel man. He developed a reputation for just standing there in a fight, doing the business, taking out five, six, seven people while being hacked to bits. An arm might be hanging useless but he would just keep going.

"He’s been gutted numerous times. He knows what it means to be holding your intestines in while someone is trying to cut your throat."

With such backgrounds, is it possible that police officers believed the men were guilty and were tempted to secure a conviction by whatever means necessary? Appeal court judges decided that in this case there was sufficient doubt about the officers’ testimony that the convictions should be quashed.

Amid all the doubt, the only certainty is that the controversy will continue.

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Reply with quote  #52 



   Good post  Max

 As much as I adhor what TC and Joe went through Justice has to be done to avenge this horrendous crime. Justice for TC and Joe too

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This case is as shocking today as it was all those years ago. What makes it horrendous is the fact that the police covered up for a mass murderer!
 

Great link there Max
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‘It is not acceptable for police forces to investigate themselves’...


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agreed hammer police investiGating police is unacceptable IT MAKES A MOCKERY OF OUR DEMOCRACY

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Campbell denied making that statement and Steele also denied saying to four detectives in a police car that "I’m no’ the one that lit the match" and telling them earlier: "I thought you would have been here before now."

The officers’ recollections of what was said - known as ‘verbals’ - were nearly identical. But the psychologists said studies showed people did not remember even such short sentences word for word. This was enough for the appeal court judges to decide the jury would have viewed the police’s evidence in a different light and the convictions were unsafe.

It is a sign of changing times: in 1984 the defence’s claims that the police had manufactured statements was regarded as outrageous and unbelievable to most.


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Who did kill the Doyles?

Ian Johnston

LORD KINCRAIG turned to the jury of 10 women and five men at Glasgow High Court. He looked grim as he spelled out just what they would have to believe if the men accused of what was then Scotland’s worst multiple murder were to go free.

The judge warned that if Tommy ‘TC’ Campbell and Joe Steele were telling the truth, then the jury would have to accept that "not one or two or four but a large number of detectives have deliberately come here to perjure themselves, to build up a false case against an accused person". It would mean there had been a conspiracy by officers of the "most sinister and serious kind... to saddle the accused wrongly with the crimes of murder and attempted murder, and a murder of a horrendous nature".

Last week, 20 years after Campbell and Steele were sentenced to life in prison for the murders of six members of the Doyle family during Glasgow’s notorious Ice Cream Wars, the Court of Appeal ruled that both men had been wrongly convicted. The implication was clear: the jury should have believed the men.

Now the words of Lord Kincraig - who clearly found the allegations of police corruption hard to accept - have come back to haunt Strathclyde Police. Campbell’s lawyer Aamer Anwar points to Kincraig’s summing up at the end of the original trial as a compelling reason why there should now be a public inquiry. He argues that the case is no longer only about Campbell and Steele, and what has now been ruled one of the gravest miscarriages of justice in Scottish legal history, but that it could be just the tip of an iceberg. To have confidence in the system, the public must be sure the same methods were not used to wrongly convict scores of others.

Campbell, 51, is now calling for a fresh murder inquiry to bring those who were responsible for the murder of the Doyle family to justice. However, the reaction from the Crown Office suggests that even though he and Steele are now deemed to be innocent, this is unlikely to happen. "Our position remains there are no new lines of inquiry in this case and there are no new suspects," a spokeswoman said.

Campbell and Steele were cleared after evidence from psychologists cast doubt on testimony given by police officers concerning incriminating statements said to have been made by both defendants. Four officers reported Campbell as saying: "I only wanted the van windows shot up. The fire at Fat Boy’s [a member of the Doyle family] was only meant to be a frightener which went too far."

Campbell denied making that statement and Steele also denied saying to four detectives in a police car that "I’m no’ the one that lit the match" and telling them earlier: "I thought you would have been here before now."

The officers’ recollections of what was said - known as ‘verbals’ - were nearly identical. But the psychologists said studies showed people did not remember even such short sentences word for word. This was enough for the appeal court judges to decide the jury would have viewed the police’s evidence in a different light and the convictions were unsafe.

It is a sign of changing times: in 1984 the defence’s claims that the police had manufactured statements was regarded as outrageous and unbelievable to most.

Some 20 years later Campbell has not finished making extraordinary allegations. In an interview with Scotland on Sunday last week, he claimed to have been given evidence during his long campaign to prove his innocence suggesting the man behind the murders was the notorious Glasgow gangster Tam ‘The Licensee’ McGraw, who was arrested but released during the original inquiry.

Furthermore, Campbell believes the gangster has been behind repeated attempts to kill him since his release from prison pending appeal, in an attempt to shut him up.

The two men were once on friendly terms, but Campbell said that while serving his life sentence he began to suspect McGraw was "making moves against me to make sure I stayed in jail" by hampering attempts by friends in Glasgow to find evidence to clear him.

"Then it became clear why he was doing it. If our conviction stood, there could be no investigation into him or anything he had done," said Campbell. He has claimed that two men who seriously injured him with knives and golf clubs in a vicious fight following his release on bail pending the appeal were McGraw and a since murdered henchman called Billy McPhee.

"What McGraw was angry about is I’m grassing him for the Doyle fire. If he had buried me before the appeal then the conviction would have stood because I wouldn’t have been there to defend myself," Campbell said.

He is now waiting for the next assassination attempt in an effort to stop him giving evidence to any new investigation or public inquiry. "It’s just usual to me. It’s just daily life," he said. "There was a point in time I had to avoid cars trying to cut me off on the pavement and people with knives. One time I went into a hardware store, bought an axe and when I came out they all ran away. There have been people with firearms and there’s been me dodging through gardens to get away. It was twice a week.

"The police said they were ‘obliged to tell me’ that contracts have been taken up and my life is in danger and that danger is active and imminent. To tell you the truth, I don’t f***ing care. I won’t let people threaten me or intimidate me. I’ll just do what I think is right."

On Friday last week, Campbell and his lawyer visited the headquarters of Strathclyde Police. They handed in a letter calling for a new investigation in light of the appeal court ruling, and lodged an official complaint.

"The police need to do an investigation so I can give them the information I have and let them do the work," Campbell said, although he admits that while he suspects McGraw’s involvement in the fire, "at the end of the day, I’m not a witness to it".

"I can only say to the police I’ve found out information from this source and that source," Campbell said.

His information includes claims that McGraw associates bought a can of petrol from a garage shortly before the fire. Campbell said the witnesses told him they had given this information to police during the original investigation but had been ignored.

‘It is not acceptable for police forces to investigate themselves’

 

However, it is understood that police are highly unlikely to view information that had been discarded at the time as new evidence that would warrant the re-opening of the case.

And claims from Campbell - notorious for extreme violence as the leader of the infamous Gaucho Razor Gang in Glasgow - about someone he clearly hates may simply be put down to an underworld feud.

The reality is the true identity of the people who murdered the Doyles will almost certainly never be known. Only suspicions remain.

Joe Steele, 42, twice escaped from prison during his sentence to mount protests claiming his innocence, gluing himself to the gates of Buckingham Palace on one occasion.

But he has maintained a low profile since the conviction was quashed and now simply wants to get on with life. His lawyer John Carroll said: "He’s lost some of the best years of his life and is wanting to spend time with his family. He has asked in the past for an inquiry but now he has won his appeal he has, in a sense, had that inquiry."

Carroll dismissed any talk of who might have been responsible for the murders. "Suspicion is no good. It was suspicion and tittle-tattle that put them in jail in the first place," he said. "From Steele’s point of view it really is a matter for the police to look into and the police have already stated they are not looking for any suspects."

Both Steele and Campbell are believed to be in line for substantial compensation payouts, possibly of more than £1m each.

Strathclyde Police have remained tight-lipped in the aftermath of the appeal court ruling. A spokeswoman said the force was waiting to examine the written judgment made in the case. She confirmed the force had accepted the letter from Campbell’s lawyer, and added: "We will examine its contents."

Anwar is also writing to First Minister Jack McConnell and Lord Advocate Colin Boyd to call for an inquiry, and his demand is already backed by several opposition politicians.

His letter to police called for an immediate apology, claimed there was a "whispering campaign" against Campbell and said charges should be brought against anyone believed to have perverted the course of justice.

Anwar believes there could be many other people who have been jailed on the strength of police statements that would be discredited by the psychologists whose evidence cleared Campbell and Rae.

His letter to Strathclyde’s Chief Constable Willie Rae states: "Whilst Strathclyde Police will be concerned at opening the ‘floodgates’, we would respectfully submit your concern should not be one of avoiding compensation claims by tens if not hundreds."

Anwar said the whole affair showed there was a need for an independent body to investigate complaints against the police. "It’s not acceptable for police forces to investigate themselves. An independent body is being introduced in England and there’s one existing in Northern Ireland, but in Scotland we don’t have one," he said. "Right up until three weeks ago the police were still fighting this and the Crown Office were still fighting this.

"The vast majority of officers within the police do a good job and a very difficult job. But when issues like this arise it is an indictment of the police force that they close ranks and feel it is not in their interest to carry out an impartial investigation. That is damaging to public confidence."

Eminent defence lawyer Joe Beltrami, who represented a relative of Campbell who was among those picked up by police then released during the inquiry, and represented Campbell in previous cases including serious assault, said he always found it hard to believe the hardman had blurted out a damaging admission.

"I felt there was a shortage of evidence. There was no forensic evidence, none at all. The case really depended in the main on the statement [allegedly] made by Campbell to the police," he said.

"When I heard he was supposed to have made a damaging comment I was a bit taken aback because he had been through the courts umpteen times before and wasn’t the sort of person to say anything at all to the police. I was astonished he said anything."

He also found Campbell’s and Steele’s persistent and strenuous denials convincing. "I was disturbed when Campbell was convicted and from the very beginning I was rooting for him," Beltrami said. "And people very often protest their innocence after conviction, but this normally finishes in a fortnight or three weeks, it doesn’t go on for 20 years."

Crime writer Reg McKay, who wrote a book with Campbell called Indictment: Trial By Fire about the case, is another long-standing supporter of the two men’s claims they had nothing to do with the fire that massacred the Doyles.

However, he is uncompromising about their criminal past. He described Steele as a "lowlife crook who would rob your granny’s meter". And as the leader of the Gaucho Razor Gang, Campbell was involved in "mindless violence, fighting for territory" in the Carntyne area of Glasgow.

"He was a vicious, vicious cruel man. He developed a reputation for just standing there in a fight, doing the business, taking out five, six, seven people while being hacked to bits. An arm might be hanging useless but he would just keep going.

"He’s been gutted numerous times. He knows what it means to be holding your intestines in while someone is trying to cut your throat."

With such backgrounds, is it possible that police officers believed the men were guilty and were tempted to secure a conviction by whatever means necessary? Appeal court judges decided that in this case there was sufficient doubt about the officers’ testimony that the convictions should be quashed.

Amid all the doubt, the only certainty is that the controversy will continue.

 

Hi Guys,

 

Was reading this article and got so mad[mad], I cant believe these men were put behind bars because of Police Officers lies, how infuriating?!

 

I really am annoyed about this one, cant believe how pathetic and worthless our system was to Joe and Tommy. 

 

It really shows you how pointless our Judiciary Laws were to those men.

 

Been accused of murder is terrible but knowing you didnt do it and just because of some words a cop states to the courts lands you twenty years inside - my god that is vile.

 

The craw is such an evil man.  It is a strange and weird feeling having such hatred for someone you dont personally know or have been affiliated with. But yet you can draw your own conclusion about him from gut feeling and instincts.

 

Joe and Tommy have paid the time for a crime they didnt do, yeah we all know they werent angels but that doesnt make them murderers of such a vast horrid crime.  I hope somewhere down the line that you's will get the APOLOGY  and the TRUTH yous so rightfully deserve.

 

At the end of the day McGraw's time will come, no one has respect for him, he is worse than a guttersnipe and he knows it.  What a sad lonely man.

 

Is there anywhere that tells you the names of the cops who made those FALSE statements? 

 

 

GANG FEUD 

Glasgow Ice Cream Wars: Man wrongly jailed says he knows who killer is – but will never tell

Joe Steele, 56, said late crimelord Tam “The Licensee” McGraw ordered the fire

A MAN wrongly jailed for the Ice Cream Wars murders insists he knows the blaze thug who kill­ed a family of six — but will never tell.

Joe Steele, 56, said late crimelord Tam “The Licensee” McGraw ordered the fire. 

But the Glasgow hardman scoffed at claims enforcer pal Gary Moore confessed a month before he died in 2010 to torching the Doyle flat.

Steele, of the city’s Garthamlock, said: “Gary’s no angel but he never admitted to anyone he done the Doyle family.

“He never admitted to f*** all in his life. McGraw ordered it and asked the people.

“I know who it is but I’ll go to my grave with it. The people who done it have got to look in the mirrors.” James Doyle, 53, and sons James, 23, Andrew, 18, and Anthony, 14, were killed in the 1986 horror.

Steele and Thomas “TC” Campbell served 18 ye­ars but their convictions were quashed in 2004.

McGraw died in 2007. Police were unavailable for comment.

matthew.coyle@the-sun.co.uk

 


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