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Police Scotland apologise for Toby Young Newsnight tweet

Stella Creasy and Toby Young debate how best to deal with Twitter trolls

 

The Scottish police force has apologised for a tweet sent during a Newsnightdebate about abusive messages on Twitter.

The tweet mocked columnist Toby Young's contribution to the programme. It was later deleted.

Police Scotland said the matter was being investigated and Twitter access was being reviewed.

Mr Young said he had blocked the force's account, was not offended and would not complain.

The journalist was appearing in a discussion with Labour MP Stella Creasy.

 
Ms Creasy, who has received threats of rape on Twitter, wants social networks to do more to protect users and to identify perpetrators.

This debate over internet abuse - known as "trolling" - began when Caroline Criado-Perez was bombarded with abuse via Twitter after successfully campaigning to have author Jane Austen depicted on the new £10 note.

Police Scotland tweet

Police Scotland said it was sorry for any upset caused by the incident

Ms Creasy appeared on Newsnight with Mr Young on Tuesday night.

The MP told the programme: "We need to make sure that police at a local level and at a national level understand the risks and dangers that can come from online behaviour."

Mr Young, who writes for the Daily Telegraph, argues that blocking and ignoring abusive posters on the internet is sufficient "in 99 cases out of 100".

A tweet on the Newsnight debate sent from the official Scottish police account contained an insult directed towards Mr Young [@toadmeister].

After receiving the message, he responded: "Just had to block @policescotland, the official police Scotland twitter feed, for abusing me on twitter. This is getting weird"

On Wednesday morning, Police Scotland tweeted: "We apologise for the tweet sent to @toadmeister & for any upset caused. The matter is being investigated & we're reviewing Twitter access."

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As part of the reform of Scottish police services in April 2013, the Police Investigations & Review Commissioner (PIRC) was established. The Act expanded the role and responsibilities of the Police Complaints Commissioner for Scotland (PCCS) to include conducting independent investigation into the most serious incidents involving the police.  

To find out more about the types of matters we may be required to investigate, please see our investigations FAQs.

Find out more about current investigations here.

Where possible, the PIRC will publish online versions of reports in relation to investigations. These may include reports on cases which the Commissioner investigated at the direction of the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service (COPFS), cases referred to the Commissioner by Police Scotland or the Scottish Police Authority (SPA) for independent investigation and cases of significant public interest which the Commissioner investigated.

In many cases there may be ongoing criminal investigations into related matters. Where this is the case, PIRC may be unable to publish the report until after the conclusion of the criminal investigation and any subsequent court proceedings.

Find out more about our procedures for reporting on non-criminal investigations here.

To view investigations reports, choose a report type from the menu below or use drop down menu at the top of this page.

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so POLICE SCOTLAND decide what to disclose and what to hide???


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Investigation reveals how Scottish cops report little crime despite two attempted murders and four rapes being reported within 24 hours 18 Aug 2013 08:09

AN INVESTIGATION carried out by the Sunday Mail revealed that 243 crimes out of 1921 reported in a 24 hour period were deemed serious.

Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

ACCORDING to Police ­Scotland, July 13 was a really quiet Saturday with little crime to speak of.

The force told the public about a couple of road crashes and a handful of music festival arrests but there was really ­nothing much else to report.

In fact, a Sunday Mail investigation has found that 1921 crimes were reported in that single 24-hour period.

And 243 of them were serious – two attempted murders, four rapes, 12 sex attacks, 16 serious assaults, 13 arson attacks, three robberies, 20 weapon offences and 173 drug crimes.

During that day, our journalists made 16 separate calls to ask police if anything of note had taken place. Every time, they were told it was all quiet.

Politicians yesterday urged chief constable Stephen House to encourage his staff to open up.

They said the public have a right to know about serious crime happening in their communities and voiced fears of an escalating culture of official secrecy.

Criminologist Professor David Wilson of Birmingham City University called for a far more open attitude.

He said: “There needs to be more ­transparency from the police.

“The public are paying for the police service so they are entitled to know what is going on. It is their democratic right.”

Human rights expert and lawyer John Scott QC said: “If there has been a change in the way police give out information, it has to be discused publicly and not smoked out.

“I would like to know Police ­Scotland’s explanation for this. The public have a right to be kept informed and one way is through the media.”

Scottish Labour’s justice spokesman Graeme Pearson MSP, a former police chief, said: “People in my constituency have reported difficulties to me in getting information from their local police.

“It has concerned me for some time how the police put information out to the public.”

On July 13, the police issued media releases about road crashes in Dumfries and Elgin and five arrests at T in the Park music festival over smoke bombs.

That day, we contacted eight regional control rooms – in Glasgow, Edinburgh, Dundee, Inverness, Edinburgh, Dumfries, Stirling and Glenrothes – at noon and at midnight.

We were told by press officers and ­control room staff that it was all quiet.

One said: “Nothing exciting. We’ve been very busy, but it’s just routine ­nonsense.”

But the public were kept in the dark about the real number and gravity of crimes that had been reported.

We obtained the true picture of crime through a freedom of information request.

Scottish Conservative chief whip John Lamont MSP added: “Reporting of crimes and other incidents of public interest is essential in a democratic society. For officers to be withholding this ­information is ­unacceptable.”

Marek Marczynski, director of ­campaigns and policy for the Index On Censorship, said: “Any censorship of crime statistics undermines freedom of information but it also undermines the watchdog role of the media.”

However David O’Connor, president of the Association of Scottish Police ­Superintendents, defended the force’s actions, claiming that revealing details could harm their operations.

He said: “The police recognise their duty to keep the public informed.

“But they must also be careful not to give out information which could hamper ongoing or future investigations. It is all about striking a balance.”

Chief Superintendent Val Thomson, who is in charge of police control rooms, said: “Our purpose is to keep people safe, and providing information where it is of operational benefit or where there is a requirement for an appeal for information supports that.

“Often it is not appropriate to give information about incidents when they are ongoing as this could ­jeopardise the operation or cause ­unnecessary distress to victims of crime and the public.

“We adhere to guidelines agreed with the Crown Office which clearly sets out what is and is not appropriate information to provide to the media.”

Our findings came months after the former Strathclyde force tied themselves in knots to try and keep the number of unsolved murders secret. They cited a string of reasons for ­refusing to release the number but later dropped them.

In 2010, they said they had 53 unsolved murders on their books. But we found the true number was more than 500, ­dating back to 1942.

At first they said they didn’t hold details about the cases, then argued that ­witnesses and victims’ families could be put at risk if the cases were made public.

Next they said releasing details could damage public confidence in speaking to the police before finally saying families of victims might be upset.

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/investigation-reveals-how-scottish-cops-2181522


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Violent crime goes down as Scotland follows Glasgow blueprint

Sir Stephen House, Chief Constable of Police Scotland

Sir Stephen House, Chief Constable of Police Scotland


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Welcome to Scotland, the SNP's police stateWelcome to Scotland, the SNP's police state
2014-01-19 00:21:26 UTC2014-01-19 11:10:15 UTC (about 11 hours later)
Scotland's SNP government has adopted a curious approach to showcasing the nation's qualities ahead of the independence referendum. You certainly can't accuse them of purveying a rose-tinted image of auld Scotia. For it seems that the country has, at some point in the last seven years, turned into the most illegal small country in the world and the SNP appear to be revelling in it.Scotland's SNP government has adopted a curious approach to showcasing the nation's qualities ahead of the independence referendum. You certainly can't accuse them of purveying a rose-tinted image of auld Scotia. For it seems that the country has, at some point in the last seven years, turned into the most illegal small country in the world and the SNP appear to be revelling in it.
For no apparent reason that I can recall, the SNP in 2007 committed itself to providing the country with an extra 1,000 police officers. There didn't appear to have been any great popular clamour for this remarkable and expensive job creation scheme for the plods. I don't remember any cataclysmic increases in violent crime across the country, certainly nothing which a disciplined, properly focused force operating under good leadership couldn't cope with. Since then, we have discovered that our police force has been anything but disciplined, focused or properly led and for this the rest of us have had to pay a mighty price in money and civil liberties.For no apparent reason that I can recall, the SNP in 2007 committed itself to providing the country with an extra 1,000 police officers. There didn't appear to have been any great popular clamour for this remarkable and expensive job creation scheme for the plods. I don't remember any cataclysmic increases in violent crime across the country, certainly nothing which a disciplined, properly focused force operating under good leadership couldn't cope with. Since then, we have discovered that our police force has been anything but disciplined, focused or properly led and for this the rest of us have had to pay a mighty price in money and civil liberties.
Last March, the numbers of police officers in Scotland reached a record high of 17,496, according to Scotland's chief statistician, and the nationalists crowed that another election promise had been met and just in time for the birth of the new single police force. Huzzah! The problem, though, with providing this small and reasonably well-behaved wee country with an extra 1,000 polis is this: how do we keep them all occupied week in, week out? Easy-peasy… we simply criminalise lots of law-abiding people. And if we don't actually criminalise them, well… we can just treat them like criminals instead.Last March, the numbers of police officers in Scotland reached a record high of 17,496, according to Scotland's chief statistician, and the nationalists crowed that another election promise had been met and just in time for the birth of the new single police force. Huzzah! The problem, though, with providing this small and reasonably well-behaved wee country with an extra 1,000 polis is this: how do we keep them all occupied week in, week out? Easy-peasy… we simply criminalise lots of law-abiding people. And if we don't actually criminalise them, well… we can just treat them like criminals instead.
Thus was the Offensive Behaviour at Football Matches legislation introduced in 2012, which sought to target young, working-class men from Glasgow's poorest districts for espousing tribal sentiments in support of Celtic or Rangers. Hundreds of previously law-abiding men have been subject to Stasi tactics by the police and dragged through the courts for singing age-old songs about the war in Ireland. Others have been kettled and intimidated by foul-mouthed cops for daring to march together peacefully to a game.Thus was the Offensive Behaviour at Football Matches legislation introduced in 2012, which sought to target young, working-class men from Glasgow's poorest districts for espousing tribal sentiments in support of Celtic or Rangers. Hundreds of previously law-abiding men have been subject to Stasi tactics by the police and dragged through the courts for singing age-old songs about the war in Ireland. Others have been kettled and intimidated by foul-mouthed cops for daring to march together peacefully to a game.
Last week, we discovered what the second part of the SNP's hitherto covert criminalise the punters strategy looked like. Between April and December last year, the police conducted almost 520,000 stop-and-search procedures on members of the Scottish public, almost 2,000 a day and twice as many as are carried out by London's Metropolitan police.Last week, we discovered what the second part of the SNP's hitherto covert criminalise the punters strategy looked like. Between April and December last year, the police conducted almost 520,000 stop-and-search procedures on members of the Scottish public, almost 2,000 a day and twice as many as are carried out by London's Metropolitan police.
The Scottish police claimed that this strategy of suspecting just about everyone of being a criminal was a success because nearly 20% resulted in a positive result. The previous week, we had discovered that Scots police were much more likely to go after people using mobile phones in their cars than those who had committed a sexual assault. Compared to modern, lawless Scotland, Snake Plissken had it easy in Escape From New York.The Scottish police claimed that this strategy of suspecting just about everyone of being a criminal was a success because nearly 20% resulted in a positive result. The previous week, we had discovered that Scots police were much more likely to go after people using mobile phones in their cars than those who had committed a sexual assault. Compared to modern, lawless Scotland, Snake Plissken had it easy in Escape From New York.
It's all nonsense, because the crime figures are provided by the Scottish police and thus must be treated in the same manner as you would an economic progress report from North Korea. Increasingly, the Scottish police are themselves operating above the law with the impunity of a general's private army in a banana republic. And it also seems Kenny MacAskill, the cabinet secretary for justice, without telling anyone, has transferred his powers as justice secretary to the unelected Stephen House, Scotland's new chief of police.It's all nonsense, because the crime figures are provided by the Scottish police and thus must be treated in the same manner as you would an economic progress report from North Korea. Increasingly, the Scottish police are themselves operating above the law with the impunity of a general's private army in a banana republic. And it also seems Kenny MacAskill, the cabinet secretary for justice, without telling anyone, has transferred his powers as justice secretary to the unelected Stephen House, Scotland's new chief of police.
In the last five years or so, we have learned that several hundred police officers actually have serious criminal records or been accused of serious criminal offences. Among the allegations are rape, sex attacks, violence, wife beating, theft, fire attacks, abduction, stalking, football disorder, racism and data breaches.In the last five years or so, we have learned that several hundred police officers actually have serious criminal records or been accused of serious criminal offences. Among the allegations are rape, sex attacks, violence, wife beating, theft, fire attacks, abduction, stalking, football disorder, racism and data breaches.
Meanwhile, despite almost 150 police officers being reported to prosecutors for alleged corruption, only six have been convicted. The alleged corruption included serious assault, bribery, blackmail and gangland activity. Unlawful access to secret files and lying in statements (an old police favourite) were the least of it. Strathclyde police, Scotland's biggest force, refused to provide figures on the pretext of cost. At this rate, the public will soon be given stop-and-search powers over the cops. God knows what would come tumbling out of their high-vis tunics.Meanwhile, despite almost 150 police officers being reported to prosecutors for alleged corruption, only six have been convicted. The alleged corruption included serious assault, bribery, blackmail and gangland activity. Unlawful access to secret files and lying in statements (an old police favourite) were the least of it. Strathclyde police, Scotland's biggest force, refused to provide figures on the pretext of cost. At this rate, the public will soon be given stop-and-search powers over the cops. God knows what would come tumbling out of their high-vis tunics.
Last week, according to the Independent, we learned that secret groups of Freemasons have been used by organised crime gangs for years to corrupt the criminal justice system. This echoes a chilling declaration by Strathclyde's deputy chief constable recently that 27 organised crime gangs were attempting to infiltrate the force by planting recruits in the ranks and grooming others. Yet, in Scotland the government has always resisted calls for membership of secret societies to be deemed unacceptable for all serving police officers and judges.Last week, according to the Independent, we learned that secret groups of Freemasons have been used by organised crime gangs for years to corrupt the criminal justice system. This echoes a chilling declaration by Strathclyde's deputy chief constable recently that 27 organised crime gangs were attempting to infiltrate the force by planting recruits in the ranks and grooming others. Yet, in Scotland the government has always resisted calls for membership of secret societies to be deemed unacceptable for all serving police officers and judges.
The abuse of their powers by the police is part of a wider picture of police corruption and lawlessness throughout the UK, which had remained unchecked despite nasty little episodes such as the Met's Flying Squad porn baron scandal of the mid-70s. The thuggery displayed by police officers during the miners' strike in 1984 at places such as Orgreave and Polkemmet was virtually sanctioned by Margaret Thatcher as she vowed to destroy those whom she called "the enemy within". The Birmingham Six, the Hillsborough cover-up and the Stephen Lawrence inquiry all pointed to a force that had been allowed far too much respect by government and judiciary.The abuse of their powers by the police is part of a wider picture of police corruption and lawlessness throughout the UK, which had remained unchecked despite nasty little episodes such as the Met's Flying Squad porn baron scandal of the mid-70s. The thuggery displayed by police officers during the miners' strike in 1984 at places such as Orgreave and Polkemmet was virtually sanctioned by Margaret Thatcher as she vowed to destroy those whom she called "the enemy within". The Birmingham Six, the Hillsborough cover-up and the Stephen Lawrence inquiry all pointed to a force that had been allowed far too much respect by government and judiciary.
In Scotland, a supposedly enlightened, progressive and democratic administration has made the police virtually untouchable and handed the force wide-ranging and discretionary powers over the people. Yet all the evidence and anecdotal experience points to an organisation that has itself turned feral and is almost beyond state control. MacAskill, now in reality acting merely as bag carrier to House, should be brought to account for allowing this to happen on his watch. An independent review of the customs, practices and recruitment policies of the police must be undertaken before the people say enough is enough and sort it out themselves.In Scotland, a supposedly enlightened, progressive and democratic administration has made the police virtually untouchable and handed the force wide-ranging and discretionary powers over the people. Yet all the evidence and anecdotal experience points to an organisation that has itself turned feral and is almost beyond state control. MacAskill, now in reality acting merely as bag carrier to House, should be brought to account for allowing this to happen on his watch. An independent review of the customs, practices and recruitment policies of the police must be undertaken before the people say enough is enough and sort it out themselves.
In the meantime, let's put all talk about membership of the EU aside. For, at this rate, if Scotland does gain its independence in September we will merely become the newest member of the confederation of independent police states. In the meantime, let's put all talk about membership of the EU aside. For, at this rate, if Scotland does gain its independence in September we will merely become the newest member of the confederation of independent police states.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hammer6
Violent crime goes down as Scotland follows Glasgow blueprint

Sir Stephen House, Chief Constable of Police Scotland

Sir Stephen House, Chief Constable of Police Scotland

  There will be a NEW CC of Police Scotland during the Easter period and House is standing down. His position and personal life choices have made his position untenable. [idea][nono][wink] 

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'Gangster tax' to plug funding gap for Scottish policing

 

CRIMINALS will pay for Scottish ­policing for the first time after Chief Constable Sir Stephen House secures his long sought-after "gangster tax".

 

His new national force will get £16 million from ill-gotten cash and assets seized by the Crown to plug its funding gap over the next two years.

For some years Sir Stephen has been lobbying to keep a share of the money his force helps to raise by targeting criminals, convicted or not, under the Proceeds of Crime Act (Poca).



I thought all this money was to go into community projects? Now it seems that it's to top up police budgets? [sneaky] 

The Scottish Government has announced that young people and their communities across Scotland will benefit from a further £24m in funding via the Cashback for Communities fund.  The programme, introduced in 2007, is funded by proceeds of crime seized by police in Scotland and has been used for sporting, arts and community activities, which range from diversionary sporting activity to more long-term potentially life-changing intervention projects, which turn young people’s lives around and provide them the opportunity of getting into employment, education, or volunteering.

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