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Bilko

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Excellent Admin2... great wee poem.

Bilko

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DNA clues in hunt for 'faceless' serial killer...

Police in Germany have stepped up the hunt for a serial killer nicknamed "the woman without a face".

The mystery woman has been linked by DNA to six murders and a string of thefts in a 15-year spree in three countries. Her latest victims may be three second-hand car dealers shot execution-style.

 
DNA clues in German hunt for faceless female serial killer
German police want to revive public awareness of the mystery killer...

The inquiry is based entirely on DNA found in smudges of sweat and nearly invisible flakes of shed skin at the crime scenes.

Police in the southwestern city of Heilbronn have no idea of the woman’s name, appearance or age, hence her nickname. But should she ever be arrested, police can link her to the genetic material in their labs.

One reason for the intensity of the hunt is that police want to avenge one of their own. She is wanted for the cold-blooded murder of a 22-year-old German policewoman, Michele Kiesewetter, at a car park in April last year.

Police believe the officer approached her and she panicked, killing her with a bullet in the face.

The first genetic traces of the offender turned up at the scene of a crime in May 1993. A retired woman, 62, was found strangled in her home in Idar-Oberstein, not far from Heilbronn, in what seemed to be a burglary that had turned violent.

In March 2001, the strangler struck again in Freiburg, southwestern Germany, killing a 61-year-old man.

Other finds include a disposable syringe found in October 2001 in a car-park. The blood on it was the suspect’s. The content had been a cocktail of drugs she had shot herself up with.

In a burgled caravan, police discovered she had tasted a biscuit. A smudge of saliva on a tooth mark in the remaining fragment of biscuit proved once again to be a give-away.

In autumn 2004, the woman took a hiking holiday in the Austrian Tyrol. She broke in to garden sheds along the road towards Innsbruck, discarding a pair of tracksuit trousers, a hooded cardigan and other items.

Her DNA has also been found at burglary scenes in France. Police said yesterday that she has left DNA at the scenes of six murders and 24 break-ins.

The murders all took place in Germany. They also said that the woman’s DNA had been found on a stone used to smash a window in a burglary in Germany just last week.

The police were seeking to revive public awareness in the case following their last appeal in April 2005, as the suspect is still at liberty and appears to be growing more ruthless.

After last year’s unexplained murder in Heilbronn of the uniformed policewoman, who had briefly worked undercover, the offender’s DNA was found on the police car.

A policeman gravely wounded in the same attack woke from a coma with no memory of the female assailant who pulled a gun and shot the two officers at close range without warning.

This year, police found a few cells of her skin after they stripped and analysed all the upholstery and carpets from the car of a man they are holding on suspicion of triple murder.

A former police informant, he was suspected of killing the three car dealers who had come from the Caucasian republic of Georgia to buy second hand German cars. Their bodies were dumped in a river at the end of January.

The informant denies the charge, saying another man, a Somali Islamist, also in police custody, was the killer. He also denies any knowledge of the phantom woman.

But her DNA has been found in the car, triggering a new theory that she was the executioner.

Police are compiling a thorough history of the car: who owned it, where it has been seen. They already know the three Georgians were driven in the car to Heppenheim, the town where they were killed.

Odder still, the car was owned by the police at the time of the killings.

The criminal investigation department bought it second-hand last year and loaned it to the informant when he was employed to brief police on the activities of his criminal associates.

Erwin Hetger, police chief of Baden-Wuerttemberg state, was jubilant at the find, calling it a "down payment" for police to solve the case of the woman without a face.

"We’re closing in on her," he said.


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madmax

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Fascinating story hammer6
 
This linkage is a great insight into an understanding of the mental imbalances of "Serial Killers"
 
http://www.fortunecity.com/roswell/streiber/273/inf_smintro.htm

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Very comprehensive link madmax...


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The Yorkshire Ripper is demanding to be freed, claiming his human rights have been infringed.

Peter Sutcliffe, who butchered 13 women and tried to kill seven more between 1975 and 1980, believes he is sane and should be released from Broadmoor top security hospital.

He is being represented by a female lawyer, who argues that the Home Office disregarded his human rights because it failed to fix a tariff for his sentence.

Saimo Chahal believes the serial killer, now 61, who smashed his victims over the head before mutilating them, has been misrepresented.

When Sutcliffe was sentenced to 20 life sentences in 1981, he was told by the judge that he would serve a minimum of 30 years. Home Secretaries have subsequently said he should never be released.

But Miss Chahal, who specialises in civil liberties and social welfare as a partner at London-based Bindmans & Partners, believes this tariff was never formalised.

Sutcliffe began his sentence at Parkhurst prison on the Isle of Wight but three years later was diagnosed with schizophrenia and transferred to Broadmoor Hospital.

Peter Sutcliffe, the Yorkshire Ripper

Peter Sutcliffe, the Yorkshire Ripper, is challenging his sentence

Miss Chahal intends to argue Sutcliffe's case in stages.

First she aims to get him back into the prison system and has requested a reassessment of his psychiatric condition.

A profile of Miss Chahal on the firm's website confirms that she acts for Sutcliffe adding: "The Secretary of State is in breach of Article Five of the [European Court of Human Rights] in failing to set a tariff."

Miss Chahal was named Legal Aid Lawyer of the Year in a 2006 poll for "repeatedly pushing the boundaries of the law on behalf of those with mental illness".

According to a report on legal website the Black Lawyers Directory, Sutcliffe's case was referred to Miss Chahal by another solicitor because she "takes on difficult cases".

The report said: "For Saimo this case raises the issue of how we treat mentally ill people who have committed heinous crimes.

"She is concerned that there is a huge amount of public information about this case that is simply untrue."

Sources said she is confident of securing Sutcliffe's release by 2011.

Olive Smelt, who survived Sutcliffe attacking her with a hammer as she returned to her Halifax home after a night out in 1975, declined to comment.

But her husband Harry said: "He didn't give the victims many human rights did he?

"I'm too old to be appalled. I just find it irritating.

"It is water off a duck's back as far as Olive is concerned.

"When you reach a certain age all that matters is waking up in the morning, putting your feet on the floor and getting on with it."

He added: "He's where he belongs and that's it.

"I don't think he should be locked up in Broadmoor, it should be a normal prison."

Sutcliffe mainly killed prostitutes in the streets of northern England.

While he was at liberty many women in Yorkshire and Manchester were too frightened to go out.

After six years he was arrested by chance in a red light area of Sheffield.

In 2001, Sutcliffe claimed that psychiatrists at Broadmoor now consider he is no longer a danger.

The Legal Services Commission said Sutcliffe had not been awarded legal aid to pay for his freedom bid.

A senior police source said: "His legal action will be fiercely opposed by the authorities.

"He remains a grave danger to the public, especially if he does not take appropriate medication.

"He should remain behind bars for the rest of his life."


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SERIAL killer Peter Manuel was one of the reasons Donald Findlay became a criminal defence lawyer, the QC has revealed.

As a child, Findlay embarrassed his father by becoming mesmerised by Manuel's gruesome trial at the High Court in Glasgow in 1958.

He says: "I devoured every word and could recite the charges and names of the victims as other seven-year-olds would rattle off nursery rhymes."

 Donald Findlay QC

It was the start of a lifelong fascination with the killer.

Findlay admits he even thought of writing a book on Manuel.

Following the guilty verdicts and sentence of death for the murder of seven people, Manuel unsuccessfully appealed in June 1958 and was hanged at Barlinnie the following month.

Findlay makes his remarks in the preface to a new book, Manuel: Scotland's First Serial Killer, by Allan M Nicol.

Findlay says "two strikingly contrasting men" were central to his decision to become a criminal defence lawyer.

One was actor Michael Dennison who played the title role in Boyd QC, a TV drama about a barrister determined to win justice for his clients.

"The other was Peter Thomas Anthony Manuel, once described as having the names of the saints and the heart of the devil."

When Findlay went to Dundee University to read law, the first thing he did was to re-read the report of Manuel's appeal.

He adds: "Defending the citizen against the power of the state is my passion. Whether that is because I believe in standing up for the underdog or am simply a bolshie so-and-so I will leave to others to reach a view on.

"For me, to have defended Manuel would have been the ultimate challenge involving, as it did, multiple murders and the spectre of the rope.

"And yes, I would have fought tooth and nail to try to save him because justice would have demanded it."


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Notorious Serial Killers 


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http://www.ayrshirehistory.org.uk/sawney/myth.htm


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TRY THE TEST...

malevole - Programming Language Inventor or Serial Killer?

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From
April 10, 2008

Police search after three Georgian men where killed near Ludwigshafen

She robs, she injects herself with heroin, she seems to kill with almost professional precision – and, as far as German detectives are concerned, she has no identity.

The hunt for the woman known as the Phantom of Heilbronn has been stepped up after the discovery of new traces of her DNA in a blood-stained white Ford Escort. “The noose is tightening,” Erwin Hetger, the chief of police in Baden-Württemberg, southwest Germany, said.

For 15 years a mysterious woman has been leaving traces of her DNA at crime scenes across Europe, suggesting her involvement in at least six murders and scores of break-ins. Rarely are there witnesses. Instead, police in the countries where she has been roaming – Germany, France and Austria – have had to piece together a profile from saliva left on biscuits nibbled at the site of a murder, a discarded cigarette packet and a spot of blood.

She may flit across borders like a ghost but she has been leaving a trail behind her. A human being loses on average four hairs in an hour and sheds a million dead cells in 40 minutes: that forensic scence harvest is all the police have to go on.

“The woman has left genetic clues in Germany, France and Austria,” Chief Inspector Bruno Bösch, the head of one of three German teams that has been on the case, said. “I have travelled 60,000km (37,300 miles) across Europe, questioning witnesses.”

In Austria there are DNA traces linking the woman to 13 crime scenes. Police arrested two burglars in Linz who must – according to some recovered hairs – have been on a break-in with the woman.

No Identikit portrait, no reliable description, not even a coherent crime profile. Sometimes she pilfers from a shed, then suddenly last year she was in the backseat of a patrol car when a 22-year-old policewoman was killed and her companion was seriously injured in Heilbronn.

“Have I missed something?” one despairing investigator has asked.

In February the bodies of three Georgian car dealers were fished out of a river. The blood of one of them was found in the Ford, as were hairs from the Phantom. The car had been bought by the police last year for an undercover operation so they should be able to reconstruct the movements of the vehicle and perhaps the identity of its passengers. It is a long shot, but the closest that the police have come to tracking down the Phantom since her DNA was first identified seven years ago.

The trail began when a boy trod on a heroin syringe in the sleepy spa town of Gerolstein, Germany. His parents were so worried that they insisted on a full blood analysis. When the DNA traces were fed into a central data bank a match with genetic material left at two unsolved murders was found. The first was of a 63-year-old who was killed in 1993 with the wire used to bind bouquets. The killer had left her DNA on the rim of a floral-print tea cup.

The evidence suggests that the Phantom is an addict – hence the desperate petty burglaries. Flakes of her skin have been found on a bullet in a gun used between feuding Romany chiefs. That suggests the Phantom might be a Gypsy but investigations in the community have not yielded any results. Nor has saliva testing of 800 women in the Heilbronn area.

“It all boils down to this: we do not know what this woman looks like, we just know her genetic code,” Chief Inspector Bösch said.


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hammer6

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Great story madmax...


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Bees help police close in on serial killers> http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn14423-bees-help-police-close-in-on-serial-killers.html


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Daughter of woman murdered a year before Rachel Nickell 'thrilled' police will interview Robert Napper over death...

 

All three were repeatedly stabbed and left for dead within a year of Miss Nickell, who was knifed 49 times by Napper in front of her son Alex as they walked in Wimbledon Common in 1992.

Despite arresting several suspects for the unsolved murders police have never found who was responsible.

Officers will now visit Napper at Broadmoor where he has been detained indefinitely. It is likely they will question him about the deaths of Claire Tiltman, 16, Penny Bell, 43, and 47-year-old Jean Bradley.

Mrs Bell's daughter Lauren Bell was just nine years-old at the time and has spent most of her life longing to see justice for her mother.

She was told yesterday (Friday) by police that they are re-opening the case and intend to question rapist killer Napper.

Mrs Bell, a businesswoman, was stabbed to death as she sat in her car near a leisure centre in Greenford, west London in December 1991.

Miss Bell said she was ecstatic that her mother's killer might finally be uncovered.

The 26 year-old, who is a customer services manager for a car manufacturer, said: "I was absolutely thrilled to see justice finally done for Rachel Nickell, so that her family can have closure on what has been a terrible time for them all.

"I have never had that closure. To solve the mystery of my mum's death and have the right person put behind bars would be a dream come true for me.

"The police did not give me any idea of the timeframe and made no promises, but I'm thrilled that at last there is some movement on my mum's case after all these years. It has been 17 years of not knowing, and still to this day there are details about my mother's death that I have not been told.

"All I have ever wanted is to know the truth, but not knowing makes life awful.

"It completely freaks me out that the beast who killed my mum could still be out there."

Speaking from her flat in the village of Tylers Green near High Wycombe, Miss Bell said she had always wondered whether the same killer was responsible for her mother and Miss Nickell's death.

"As a family we have always followed the Nickell case because it was so similar to my mother's case, in terms of the timeframe and the brutality of both murders," she said. "I don't have the expertise to say whether I believe Napper is the man responsible for my mum's death.

"However, due to the similarities of the two cases it has always been at the back of my mind that he could be the killer.

"I'm delighted that the police are going to speak to him about it."

Claire Tiltman was stabbed more than 40 times in Kent six months after Miss Nickell, while Miss Bradley was stabbed 30 times in west London two months later.

Claire's father Cliff has asked Kent Police about potential links to Napper in light of his conviction this week.

"They say they have nothing conclusive so cannot comment," he said.

"I can't condemn Robert Napper because I don't know if he did it or not.

"Over the years there have been a number of people put in the frame for my daughter's murder."

Napper has been at Broadmoor since 1995 after admitting killing 27-year-old Samantha Bisset and her four-year-old daughter Jazmine the year before.

It is feared he could be linked to as many as 106 rapes and sexual offences on 86 victims.

Laurence Alison, professor of forensic psychology at Liverpool University, said the three unsolved murders were striking in their similarity and should be revisited.

"Statistically, frenzied knife attacks that appear motiveless are pretty rare," he said. "These were all in the early 90s, the victims suffered multiple knife wounds and certainly two of them were geographically close.

"They may or may not be linked (to Napper), but it would be important to carefully consider them. Improvements in technology and analytical procedures mean police can explore these links systematically - an option that wasn't open to them 15 years ago."


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'Stew maker' tells of dissolving bodies

A MEXICAN drugs gangster has confessed to dissolving the bodies of 300 rivals in baths of caustic soda over the past decade.
Santiago Meza Lopez, who is known as "the stew maker", claimed he was paid $600 (£440) a week to dispose of the corpses of murdered rival gang members in caustic soda.

The 45-year-old, who is accused of being a key lieutenant of a major Mexican drug kingpin, was presented to the media after being arrested on the outskirts of Tijuana.

More than 700 people died in the US border city last year as a long-running narcotics war threatened to spiral out of control.

Lopez is believed to be in the pay of Teodoro Garcia Simental, a notorious crime lord battling for control over drug trafficking routes through Tijuana, after defecting from the powerful Arellano Felix cartel.

Soldiers and police paraded Lopez before reporters at a cement-block shack on the outskirts of Tijuana where he allegedly disposed of the bodies. Two grave-sized holes had been dug near the walls.

The security officers made Lopez tell reporters how he allegedly got rid of the bodies, prodding him to speak up whenever he mumbled.

He said: "They brought me the bodies and I just got rid of them. I didn't feel anything. May they forgive me."

Those who were subjected to the gruesome process are believed to have been members of the Felix gang. He described his victims as "the products of the drug war, enemies or debtors of Simental".

Lopez said the victims were already dead by the time he received them and that he didn't know their identities. He claimed it took about 24 hours to dissolve them in barrels filled with caustic soda.

Officials contend he dumped the bodies in graves, poured caustic soda on them and let them dissolve underground.

Lopez was among three men and a woman detained by members of the First Amphibious Group Special Forces Unit and the Federal Police near the toll road between Ensenada and Rosarito Beach last week. This month, the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) identified Garcia as one of 10 men it believes are battling for drug trafficking routes through Tijuana. The DEA said Garcia is the chief rival of Arellano Felix cartel leader Fernando Sanchez Arrellano.

Simental, nicknamed El Teo, narrowly escaped after soldiers raided an upmarket resort outside the Baja California port city 70 miles south of San Diego on Thursday.

Officials have blamed the power struggle for a surge in violence in Tijuana, the birthplace of the Arellano Felix cartel. The two men split in April after a shoot-out between their followers in Tijuana left at least 14 people dead.

Mexico's drug violence has surged and grown more gruesome in recent years, particularly in northern border cities Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez. Drug violence claimed more than 5,300 lives last year.

In one case last year, authorities found human teeth and other remains inside barrels left on a Tijuana street. Officials did not say whether Meza was suspected of involvement in that case.

Last week two human heads were found inside fridges near police stations in Celaya, a city in central Guanajuato state. Hours later, police found the bodies with their hands handcuffed. A message was left with the heads threatening allies of a drug cartel knows as 'La Familia'. It was signed by Zetas, a group of hit men for the Gulf Cartel.

Felipe Calderon, Mexico's president, has deployed thousands of troops across the country in an attempt to crack down on the cartels.

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